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&/k£cwsO Myosin- 
iO,nrj Fifteenth) Annual Report 



OF THE 



HYDRO-ELECTRIC POWER 
COMMISSION 



OF THE 



PROVINCE OF ONTARIO 



FOR THE YEAR ENDED OCTOBER 31st 



1922 



PRINTED BY ORDER OF 
THE LEGISLATIVE ASSEMBLY OF ONTARIO 




TORONTO 
Printed and Published by Clarkson W. James, Printer to the King's Most Excellent Majesty 

19 23 



Printed by 

THE UNITED PRESS LIMITED 

Toronto 



LIBRARY 

727485 

umvFRS lTY OF TORONTO 



To His Honour The Honourable Harry Cockshutt, 

Lieutenant-Governor of Ontario 

May It Please Your Honour: 

The undersigned has the honour to present to your Honour the Fifteenth 
Annual Report of the Hydro-Electric Power Commission of Ontario for the 
fiscal year ending October 31st, 1922. 

This Report covers all of the Commission's activities and also embodies 
those of the municipal Electric Utilities operating in conjunction with the 
various systems to supply electric service to the people of the Province. The 
financial statements, the statistical data, and the general information herein 
submitted have been so arranged and presented as to give the reader a ready and 
intelligent grasp of every important feature of the Commission's operations. 

The Report deals with the various operations of the Commission for the 
past year with respect to 13 systems to which are connected 239 municipalities, 
65 townships and rural districts and 51 industrial companies. The Report 
also shows the cumulative results for the various periods during which operation 
has been maintained. 

No one taking a broad outlook on world conditions can fail to be impressed 
with the difficulties which still beset general commercial and industrial advance- 
ment. European markets, especially, have been unable to resume their normal 
importations, and this has had its effect upon Canadian manufactured and 
agricultural products. There have been circumstances in the great Republic 
to the south which, of late, have been unfavourable with respect to our exports 
to this important market. Obviously, such circumstances have contributed to 
a curtailment in the growth of the demand for electrical energy for power pur- 
poses. No review of the last year's operations of an organization such as the 
Hydro-Electric Power Commission can properly be appraised without taking 
cognizance of the important factors referred to. It is a gratification to 
know, however, that, notwithstanding all such adverse factors, the Commission's 
operations during the past year have been the most successful in its history. 

It is most gratifying to the Commission to be able to report that the increase 
in revenue in the municipalities in the Niagara district was sufficient to carry 
the Queenston-Chippawa development without the necessity, with but very 
few exceptions, of having to increase the rates to consumers. 

In reviewing the results of the year's work there are two aspects of the 
Commission's operations which should clearly be distinguished, namely, the 
relationship of the Commission to the municipalities and the relationship of the 
municipalities to their customers. This statement deals particularly with the 
operations of the Commission with the municipalities, with respect to which 
the total revenue for the year was $7,893,979.41, while the cost of service, made 
up of the cost of power, operation, maintenance, administration and interest, 
was $7,102,737.09, and the necessary sinking fund and reserves for renewals 
and contingencies amounted to $947,062.06, making a total of $8,049,799.15. 
As is its custom, the Commission at the beginning of the year determined a 
schedule of rates to cover the estimated cost of service to all municipalities. 
After meeting all obligations in accordance with Section 23 of the Power Com- 

iii 



iv FIFTEENTH ANNUAL REPORT OF THE No. 49 

mission Act, the expenditures and reserves exceeded the revenue by $155,819. 74, 
or 1 . 97 per cent. This amount was billed to the municipalities and taken up 
in their operation and balance sheets, so that the Commission's balance sheet 
with the municipalities shows neither profit nor loss. 

A summary of the financial operations of the Commission with the muni- 
cipalities comprising the various systems is presented under the respective 
systems as follows: 

NIAGARA SYSTEM 

While the actual cost of development, transmission and administration 
exceeded the estimates on which the interim rates were based, by $307,257.73, 
this deficit has been billed to the municipalities and absorbed in their operating 
costs. After absorbing this deficit, the municipal accounts show a gross sur- 
plus from the year's operation of $1,006,444.62 and a net surplus of $406,330.40, 
after providing for $600,114.22 depreciation. 

On the Niagara system there were only thirteen municipalities that showed 
an actual deficit during the year, totalling $21,416.07 out of a total gross 
revenue of $10,407,875.83. 

During the year, several serious accidents occurred in the Ontario Power 
Company's generating station and in the Queenston-Chippawa generating 
station. These circumstances necessitated some of the generators being laid 
up for repairs for an extended period, and this, in turn, necessitated the pur- 
chase of a considerable quantity of electrical power to supply the requirements 
of the Niagara system, — a fact which materially increased the cost of power 
supplied to the municipalities in this system. 

During the past year there has been a gradual increase, both in the number 
of customers supplied on the Niagara system and also in the loads supplied to 
the various municipalities. 

SEVERN SYSTEM 

The Severn system is supplied from the Big Chute development on the 
Severn river, with arrangements for auxiliary supply from the Eugenia system, 
the Wasdells system and the Orillia plant at Ragged rapids. This system 
supplied seventeen municipalities and one rural power district, located south of 
Georgian bay and west of lake Simcoe. 

The municipal records show a net surplus from the year's operation of 
$46,996.62 after providing for the full amount of the depreciation. One small 
village showed a deficit of $107.25; all the other municipalities have a credit 
balance on the system's operation. 

EUGENIA SYSTEM 

The Eugenia system is supplied with power from a generating plant located 
at Eugenia falls on the Beaver river, about twelve miles south of Georgian 
bay, and serves twenty-three municipalities and two rural power districts in the 
surrounding district. 

The actual cost of development and operation was $22,915.02 less than the 
estimates on which the interim rates were based, and the municipalities oper- 
ated with a net surplus for the year of $40,098.58, after providing for the full 
amount of the depreciation. 

The increase in the power requirements of the municipalities on this system 
has made it necessary for the Commission to investigate the installation of a 
second pipe line in order to increase the capacity of the generating plant. 



1923 HYDRO-ELECTRIC POWER COMMISSION 



WASDELLS SYSTEM 

The Wasdells system, with a generating plant located at Wasdells falls, on 
the Severn river, supplies eight villages and two industrial loads located west 
of lake Simcoe; two villages being added to the system during the past year. 

The actual cost of power during the year was $5,288.53 less than the estim- 
ates on which the interim rates were based, and the municipalities operated 
with a net surplus of $11,049.36 after providing for the full amount of the 
depreciation. 

The only municipal deficit was in one village which had operated for only 
two months and the loss was something less than $100.00. 

MUSKOKA SYSTEM 

The Muskoka system is supplied from a development at High falls, on the 
Muskoka river, and serves the municipalities of Huntsville and Gravenhurst. 

These municipalities absorbed the actual cost of power and operated with 
a net surplus during the year of $2,627.95 after providing for the full 
amount of the depreciation. 

ST. LAWRENCE SYSTEM 

The St. Lawrence system serves the district immediately to the north of 
the St. Lawrence river, between Brockville and Cornwall; the supply of power 
for the system being purchased from the Cedar Rapids Transmission Company ; 
the power being delivered at a point near Cornwall. 

The increased load on the system has made it necessary, during the year, 
to construct additional lines and make other necessary changes, so that 
power is now transmitted over the system at 44,000 volts instead of 22,000 
volts, as formerly. 

The municipalities forming this system operated during the year with a 
net surplus of $23,739.92 after providing for the full amount of the depreciation. 

RIDEAU SYSTEM 

The Rideau system serves the district in the vicinity of Smiths Falls, Perth 
and Carleton Place; power being supplied for the system from a Hydro-electric 
development at High Falls, on the Mississippi river, from the Carleton Place 
generating plant, and, also, with power purchased from the Rideau Power 
Company. 

All of the municipalities on this system operated at a profit; the. total for 
the year amounting to $25,592.07 after providing for the full amount of the 
depreciation. 

THUNDER BAY SYSTEM 

The Thunder Bay system is located north of lake Superior and is supplied 
with power from a power development constructed by the Commission on the 
Nipigon river, approximately sixty miles from the city of Port Arthur. 

Owing to circumstances over which the Commission had no control, some 
of the loads it was expected to supply from this plant during the year did not 
materialize, and, in consequence, the amount at which the municipality of Port 
Arthur was billed for power during the year was not sufficient to meet all of 
the charges on the development. The Nipigon plant, it will be recalled, was 



vi FIFTEENTH ANNUAL REPORT No. 49 

installed with sufficient capacity' to supply the power requirements of large pulp 
and paper undertakings which all evidences indicated would, in the near future, 
be established in this district. 

In 1922, negotiations with a large pulp and paper company had reached 
the stage where a contract for a large block of power will, probably, be signed 
early in the coming year. With this large additional load on the system, it 
will, in a few years, be on a self-supporting basis without the necessity of 
increasing the rate at which the municipality of Port Arthur is now being 
billed for power. 

During the year, the municipality of Port Arthur has been billed for the 
load taken at a rate of $25.00 per horsepower and the cost of operation in excess 
of this rate is being carried forward as a charge against the future operation of 
this system. 

CENTRAL ONTARIO SYSTEM 

This system was purchased by the Government of the Province from the 
former owners, the Electric Power Co., Ltd., on March 1, 1916. Since June 1, 
1916, it has been operated continuously by the Hydro-Electric Power Commis- 
sion of Ontario, as trustees for the Province, and serves the district lying between 
Whitby and Kingston. 

An additional power development was constructed at Ranney falls on the 
Trent river, to supply the growing demand for power. This plant was placed 
in operation in August, 1922, and adds 10,000 horsepower to the capacity of the 
system. 

The financial results of the operations for the past year were satisfactory. 
The revenue was sufficient to meet all costs of operation, all interest charges and 
to provide the full required increments of reserves for renewals, contingencies, 
and sinking fund on that portion of the investment for which sinking fund pro- 
vision is required. Total accumulated reserves now amount to $1,217,980.25. 

Gratifying improvement has been made in the financial position of local 
utilities such as gas plants, waterworks system and street railway. 

Those interested in the work of the Hydro-Electric Power Commission will 
find its various operations fully set forth in the extensive tables which comprise 
this Report. A review of the various data will disclose many interesting 
features. Thus, by way of illustration, the automatic reduction in the deben- 
ture debt, due to the annual principal or sinking fund payments being provided 
for out of revenue, and the remarkable accumulation of assets, reflect the satis- 
factory financial condition of the Hydro utilities generally. The tabular state- 
ment on page 295 shows in condensed form the relation of assets to liabilities in 
fifty municipalities. In the first eighteen municipalities the quick assets such as 
cash, bonds, accounts receivable and inventories exceed in value the total liabil- 
ities, including the debenture balance, and they may be considered as 
being out of debt. In the remaining thirty-two municipalities the excess of 
liabilities over the quick assets is relatively so small that a number of them will 
be transferred to the "out-of-debt" list when the books are closed at the end 
of 1923. 

Respectfully submitted, 

ADAM BECK, 

Chairman 



Toronto, Ontario, March 30th, 1923, 



Colonel Sir Adam Beck, Kt., LL.D., 

Chairman, Hydro-Electric Power Commission of Ontario, 

Toronto, Ontario. 



Sir, — I have the honour to transmit herewith the Fifteenth Annual Report 
of the Hydro-Electric Power Commission of Ontario for the fiscal year ended 
October 31st, 1922. 

I have the honour to be, 

Sir, 

Your obedient servant, 

W. W. Pope, 

Secretary 



HYDRO-ELECTRIC POWER COMMISSION 

OF ONTARIO 



COLONEL SIR ADAM BECK, Kt., LL.D., Chairman 

LT.-COL. HON. D. CARMICHAEL, D.S.O., M.C. 

FRED R. MILLER, Esq. 

W. W. POPE, Secretary 

F. A. GABY, Chief Engineer 



1923 HYDRO-ELECTRIC POWER COMMISSION ix 



CONTENTS 

Section Page 

I. Legal Proceedings -------------- 1 

Acts (see also Appendix I) ---------- - 1 

Right-of-Way and Lands ------------ 3 

II. Transmission Systems (see also Appendix II) -.-_.-. 6 

Niagara System - - ___.__- 6 

Eugenia System, Wasdells System --------- 8 

Muskoka System, St. Lawrence System, Rideau System, Thunder Bay 

System .-_-. ___. io 

Ottawa System, Central Ontario and Trent System, Nipissing System - 1 1 

III. Operation of the Systems ------------ 12 

Niagara System -------------- 16 

Ontario Power Company ------------ 23 

Toronto Power Company ------------ 27 

Combined Northern Systems ----------- 28 

Severn System -------------- 29 

Eugenia System _.-_____- 30 

Wasdells System -------------- 33 

Muskoka System ------------- 35 

St. Lawrence System ------------- 37 

Rideau System ---. _ 38 

Thunder Bay System -------------41 

Ottawa System -------- 43 

Central Ontario and Trent System (see also Appendix III)- - - - 43 

Nipissing System -------------- 48 

Operating Department Meter Section - - 50 

IV. Electrical Engineering and Construction - 51 

Niagara System - - 51 

Queenston Generating Station - - - - - - - - -, -» 51 

Ontario Power Company ------------ 58 

Severn System -.-------- 74 

Eugenia System ------- 76 

Wasdells System ------------- 78 

Muskoka System -------------- 78 

St. Lawrence System ------------ 80 

Rideau System ---------------82 

Thunder Bay System ------------- 82 

Ottawa System --------- 83 

Central Ontario and Trent System - 83 

Nipissing System _._ 102 

Transforming Station Details— Tables of ------ - 103 

V. Hydraulic Engineering and Construction - - - - - - - - 116 

Niagara System -- ______ 116 

Severn System - - - - - - - - . - - - - - - 120 

Muskoka System - ------------- 12 1 

St. Lawrence System - - - - - - - - - - - - -121 

Thunder Bay System - ------------ 12 1 

Central Ontario and Trent System - - - - - - - - - -122 

Nipissing System ------ _ _ . 124 

Miscellaneous - - - - - - - - . - -.- - - - - 124 



x FIFTEENTH ANNUAL REPORT OF THE No. 49 

Section . Page 

VI. Municipal Work - - 126 

Niagara System ________ 126 

Niagara System — Rural ------- 132 

Essex County System -------- 136 

Severn System ------ 137 

Eugenia System -------------- 139 

Wasdells System ------------- 141 

Muskoka System --------- 142 

St. Lawrence System -------- 143 

Rideau System ------- 146 

Thunder Bay System ------------- 147 

Ottawa System - -- -- 147 

Central Ontario and Trent System - 148 

Nipissing System -__ __-..- 150 

New Ontario District - 150 

VII. Electric Railways -------------- 151 

General Discussion ------------- 151 

Reports Made on Electric Railways - - - - 155 

Report on Work Done During Year --------- 161 

Operating Statistics - - - - - - - - - - - - -171 

Financial Statements - 172 

VIII. General Activities of the Commission - - - 176 

Electrical Inspection ----- 176 

Laboratories -------- 179 

IX. Financial Statements - - 189 

Explanatory Statement Respecting the Accounts - - - - - - 189 

General Detailed Statement of Assets and Liabilities - 194 

Niagara System 200 

Severn System -------------- 230 

Eugenia System -------------- 236 

Wasdells System ------------- 246 

Muskoka System - 252 

St. Lawrence System ------------ 258 

Rideau System - - 262 

Thunder Bay System ------- 266 

Central Ontario and Trent and Nipissing Systems ------ 270 

Thorold System ------ 280 

Essex County System ------- 282 

Ontario Power Company ------------ 284 

Provincial Treasurer Account 290 

X. Municipal Accounts ------ 292 

Explanatory Statement __---------- 292 

Consolidated Operating Report ---------- 296 

Consolidated Balance Sheet ----------- 298 

Statement A — Comparative Balance Sheets 300 

Combined Balance Sheet of Hydro Municipal Utilities ----- 377 

Statement B — Condensed Operating Reports 396 

Statement C — Comparative Detailed Operating Reports - 408 
Statement D — Comparative Revenue, Consumption, Number of Consumers, 

Average Monthly Bill, Net Cost per Kilowatt-hour, etc. - - 470 

Statement E — Respecting Street Lights - -521 

Statement F — Cost of Power and Power Rates 532 

Statement G — Lighting Rates in Municipalities - 542 

Appendix I. Acts -._ 553 

Appendix II. Description of Transmission Lines 585 

Appendix III. Flow Regulation of the Trent and Otonabee Rivers - 648 

Index 671 



1923 HYDRO-ELECTRIC POWER COMMISSION xi 



ILLUSTRATIONS 

Page 
Queenston-Chippawa Development: Queenston Power House. Opening Cere- 
mony, December 28, 1921 Frontispiece 

Transmission Lines: 

Towers on Queenston Escarpment Wall for High-voltage Outgoing Lines 

from Nos. 1, 2 and 3 Units in Queenston Generating Station - 7 
Sketch Illustrating Tentative Scheme for Using the One Right-of-Way 
for Pedestrian, Vehicular and Railway Traffic and for the Trans- 
mission of Electricity at High Voltage 7 

Semi-Anchor Tower, 3-Degree Angle. Queenston-Burlington Trunk Line - 9 

Tree within Base of Tower 9 

Queenston-Burlington Trunk Line Crossing the New Welland Ship Canal 9 

Switching Tower on the Nipigon-Port Arthur, 110,000-volt Wood-pole Line 10 

Queenston-Chippawa Development: 

Queenston Power House. General View from United States Side of Niagara 

River, December 20, 1921 ----.------- 52 

Queenston Power House. General View from United States Side of Niagara 

River, November 1, 1922 53 

Screen House from South- East, October 8, 1921 - ------- 54 

Administration Building and Screen House from South-East, November 3, 

1922 .--..----- 54 

Queenston Power House: Erection of No. 2 Generator. Installing Rotor 55 

No. 1 Transformer Bank and Delta Bus ------- - 55 

110,000-volt Bus Connections and Disconnecting-S witches - 56 

Outgoing Lines Connected through Rear Pent Houses on Roof 57 

Ontario Power Company: Accident in Power House. Segment of Rotor Thrown 

through Roof - -- 59 

Birds-eye View showing Damage Done by Bursting of Generator 59 

Hamilton Transformer Station from North-East 75 

Saltfleet Distributing Station - • - - 7.5 . 

Greenbank Distributing Station from East _•-_■- 79 

Greenbank Distributing Station from West 79 

Ranney Falls Development — Central Ontario and Trent System: 

Generating Station Progress: South Elevation, June 30, 1922 - .-•■-" 85 

East Elevation, June 30, 1922 85 

Pouring No. 1 Supply Pipe and Erection of Generator-Room Columns, 

December 1, 1921 87 

Transformer- wing Main-floor Reinforcing, February 1, 1922 - 87 

Superstructure Steel Work, January 17, 1922 - 89 

Conduit Installation on Control-Room Floor, February 21, 1922 - - 89 

Setting First Half of No. 2 Generator Stator, April 4, 1922 93 
No. 1 Generator Spider, Wound for Heating Electrically, prior to 

Shrinking on Shaft. July 1, 1922 93 

Generating Station Equipment: Control-Room Switchboard. July 1, 1922 - 95 

Generators from South End of Room. June 30, 1922 ----- 95 

Low- Voltage Disconnecting-Switches. June 30, 1922 96 

High- Voltage Lightning Arrester Equipment. June 30, 1922 - - - 96 

Bank of Two 4,500-kv-a., 3-phase Transformers. July 1, 1922 97 

High- Voltage Lightning- Arrester Equipment. June 30, 1922 - - - 97 

Low- Voltage Disconnecting-Switches and Structures. June 30, 1922 - 99 

Low- Voltage Bus Structure. July 1, 1922 ------- 100 

Queenston-Chippawa Development — Hydraulic Features: Control Gate Near 

Montrose. Men Clearing the Canal. December 22, 1921 - - 117 

Intake on the Niagara River at Chippawa. Diffuser Openings Nos. 5 to 1 119 
Intake in the Niagara River at Chippawa. Looking out through No. 4 

Inner Diffuser .._-_ 119 



XI 1 



FIFTEENTH ANNUAL REPORT 1923 



Page 
Nipigon Development: Power House and Dam from North- West. November 1, 

1921 123 

Nipigon Development: Power House and Main Dam from East. October 29, 1921 123 
Meter and Standards Laboratory: Triple Reversing Switch for Wattmeter 

Testing, and Oil Bath for Standard Resistances 183 

Structural Materials Laboratory: Torsion Test on Large Post-type Insulator 185 

Apparatus Used for Wear Tests of Concrete Floor Preparations - - - 187 

Self- aligning Grips for Testing Metals in Tension - - - - - - 187 

Gurley Graphic Water Stage Register ______ 65 1 

Rice Lake Gauges - - - - - - - 653 



diagrams 

Queenston Generating Station — Peak Loads, 1922 -------- 13 

Niagara System — Diagram of Stations. Insert facing ------ 16 

Niagara System— Peak Loads, 1910 to 1922 18 

Niagara System — Monthly Kilowatt Hours Taken by the, 1918 to 1922 - 20 

Ontario Power Company — Peak Loads, 1917 to 1922 - 24 

Ontario Power Company — Total Monthly Output of Generating Station, 1917 

to 1922 - 25 

Toronto Power Company— Peak Loads, 1920-1921-1922 27 

Severn, Eugenia, Wasdells and Muskoka Systems — Diagram of Stations. Insert 

facing 28 

Severn, Eugenia and Wasdells Systems — Peak Loads, 1920-1921-1922 - 32 

Muskoka System— Peak Loads, 1920-1921-1922 35 

St. Lawrence and Rideau Systems — Diagram of Stations - - 36 

St. Lawrence System— Peak Loads, 1920-1921-1922 37 

Rideau System— Peak Loads, 1920-1921-1922 - - - 39 

Thunder Bay System — Peak Loads, 1916 to 1922 --------- 40 

Thunder Bay System — Diagram of Stations _,__ 41 

Ottawa System — Peak Loads, 1917 to 1922 ---------- 42 

Central Ontario and Trent System — Diagram of Stations 44 

Central Ontario and Trent System — Peak Loads, 1916 to 1922 ----- 46 

Nipissing System — Diagram of Stations _._ 48 

NiPissiNG System— Peak Loads, 1920-1921-1922 - - 49 

Central Ontario and Trent System — Ranney Falls Development. Plan of 

Generating Station 90 

Central Ontario and Trent System — Ranney Falls Development. Diagram of 

Connections 91 

Essex District Railways — Operating Statistics - 166 

In Appendix III 

Plate A — Power Developments on Trent and Otonabee Rivers 648 

Plate D — Rice Lake Elevations, Graphic Records of 655 

Plate E — Diagrams of Lake and River Elevations, Stream Flow and Loads 659 

Plate G — Elevations and Flow — Heel y-Hastings Reach and Rice Lake - - - 661 

Plate F — Flow Regulation at Heely Falls - 663 

Plate H — Load Reductions, July, 1922 ---------- 666 

Plate I — Analysis of operation _______ 667 



MAP 

Transmission Lines and Stations of the Hydro-Electric Power Commission of 

Ontario - - At End of Volume 



FIFTEENTH ANNUAL REPORT 

OF THE 

Hydro-Electric Power Commission 

of Ontario 



SECTION I 

LEGAL PROCEEDINGS 

HIS MAJESTY, by and with the consent of the Legislative Assembly of 
the Province of Ontario, in 1922, passed eight special Acts relating to 
the work of the Hydro-Electric Power Commission of Ontario. These Acts 
are reproduced in full as an appendix to this report. The short titles to the 
said Acts are as follows: 

The Power Commission Act, 1922, Chapter 31. 

The Rural Hydro-Electric Distribution Act, 1922, Chapter 32. 

An Act respecting the filing of Claims against certain Companies or their 
Properties, Chapter 33. 

The County of York Radial Railway Act, 1922, Chapter 34. 

The Toronto Suburban Railway Company Act, 1922, Chapter 35. 

The Municipal Electric Railway Act, 1922, Chapter 69. 

An Act respecting the City of Niagara Falls, Chapter 120. 

An Act respecting the Sandwich, Windsor and Amherstburg Railway, 
Chapter 144. 

The agreements between the Hydro-Electric Power Commission of Ontario 
and the Municipalities and Corporations mentioned in the list hereunder given 
were approved by Order-in-Council dated the 28th day of April, 1922. These 
agreements are as follows: 

With the Town of Orillia, 9th December, 1919. 
With the Town of Thorold, 20th December, 1920. 
With the Town of Uxbridge, 3rd March, 1920. 
With the Town of Merritton, 25th November, 1920. 
With the Town of Alexandria, 26th January, 1920. 
With the Town of Kincardine, 30th June, 1920. 
With the Town of Wingham, 20th February, 1920. 
With the Village of Newbury, 1st November, 1920. 
With the Village of Wroxeter, 21st January, 1921. 
With the Village of Port Perry, 4th May, 1920. 
With the Village of Lucknow, 5th March, 1920. 
With the Village of Norwood, 17th March, 1920. 
With the Village of Lakefield, 14th February, 1920. 
With the Village of Teeswater, 2nd March, 1920. 

1 

1 H.C. 



FIFTEENTH ANNUAL REPORT OF THE No. 49 

With the Village of Lancaster, 10th February, 1920. 

With the Village of Lanark, 10th January, 1921. 

With the Village of Maxville, 26th January, 1920. 

With the Police Village of Martintown, 23rd April, 1920. 

With the Police Village of Apple Hill, 25th May, 1920. 

With the Police Village of Kirkfield, 24th February, 1920. 

With the Police Village of Priceville, 8th March, 1920. 

With the Township of Winchester, 6th November, 1920. 

With the Township of Elizabethtown, 6th December, 1920. 

With the Ontario Rock Company, Limited, 30th January, 1920. 

With His Majesty The King represented by the Minister of Militia and 

Defence, 1st December, 1920. 
With the Arthur Pequegnat Clock Company of Kitchener, — October, 1920. 
With the G. W. MacFarlane Engineering Ltd., 2nd October, 1920. 
With the Nipigon Fibre and Paper Mills Limited, 1st October, 1920. 
With the Brunner Mond Canada Limited, 9th September, 1920. 
With the Village of Wardsville, 14th March, 1921. 
With the Village of Port Dover, 22nd November, 1921. 
With the Village of Queenston, 25th July, 1921. 
With the Village of Thedford, 22nd September, 1921. 
With the Village of Alvinston, 24th June, 1921. 
With the Village of Kemptville, 21st December, 1920. 
With the Township of Beverley, 15th December, 1921. 
With the Township of Yarmouth, 8th November, 1921. 
With the Township of Raleigh, 21st November, 1921. 
With the Township of North Dorchester, 18th November, 1921. 
With the Township of Westminster, 29th November, 1921. 
With the Township of Charlottenburg, 3rd October, 1921. 
With the Township of West Nissouri, 15th December, 1921. 
With the Township of South Dorchester, 7th November, 1921. 
With the Township of Brantford, 31st October, 1921. 
With the Township of Nottawasaga, 20th October, 1921. 
With the Township of Howard, 7th November, 1921. 
With the Township of Thorold, 15th December, 1921. 
With the Township of Orford, 26th November, 1921. 
With the Township of Nepean, 25th August, 1921. 
With the Township of Edwardsburg, 1st August, 1921. 
With the Township of Augusta, 9th May, 1921. 
With the Township of North Oxford, 5th December, 1921. 
With the Township of Willoughby, 1st December, 1921. 
With the Township of East Nissouri, 21st December, 1921. 
With the Township of Crowland, 15th December, 1921. 
With the Township of Norwich, 14th November, 1921. 
W 7 ith the Township of Artemesia, 29th October, 1921. 
With the Township of Bertie, 10th November, 1921. 
With the Township of Stamford, 14th November, 1921. 
With the Township of Kinloss, 21st November, 1921. 
With the Township of Chatham, 21st November, 1921. 
With the Township of Sandwich East, 14th November, 1921. 
With the County of Welland, 10th May, 1921. 

With the Standard Steel Construction Company of Welland, 15th February, 
1921. 



1923 HYDRO-ELECTRIC POWER COMMISSION 3 

With the Brantford Sand and Gravel Company, Ltd., 24th October, 1920. 
With the Dominion Sugar Company Ltd. of Chatham, 29th December, 1921. 
With the Ontario Power Company of Niagara Falls, 11th November, 1920. 
With the Water & Light Commission of the Town of Campbellford, 9th 

July, 1921. 
With the Water & Light Commission of the Town of Preston, 7th July, 1921. 



RIGHT-OF-WAY AND LANDS 

Rural Power Lines 

The construction of rural power lines to supply electrical energy to farmers 
has been proceeded with quite actively during the past year, and while in general 
the municipalities in which the lines have been constructed have taken care of 
pole and tree trimming rights, yet there have been quite a number of cases in 
which the services of an agent of the Right-of-Way have been required to arrange 
necessary settlements. 

The procedure followed by the department when the construction of rural 
or other lines, upon public highways, has been decided upon is to communicate 
with the authorities controlling the roads or highways upon which it is proposed 
to locate lines, viz.: provincial highways, county provincial roads, suburban 
roads, county roads, or ordinary municipal roads, and arrange for the consent 
and co-operation of these authorities in the location of these lines. This course 
has worked out very satisfactorily and has prevented any friction between 
the authorities controlling the different classes of roads and the Commission, 
and especially in the case of roads controlled by the provincial Department 
of Highways. 

During the year a settlement has been arranged with that department 
as to the cost of moving poles on roads which have been taken over by that 
department since the construction of pole lines upon them. 

Rural lines have been constructed or arrangements made for such con- 
struction in the following townships: 

Augusta, Bertie, Blenheim, Brantford, Charlottenburg, Caradoc, Chatham, 
Clinton, Dover, East Flamboro', East Zorra, Edwardsburgh, Flos, 
Grantham, Harwich, Kingston, London, Louth, Maidstone, Markham, 
North Dumfries, Nottawasaga, Oro, Orford, Rochester, Saltfleet, 
Sandwich West, Sarnia, Scarboro', Stamford, Stephen, Sunnidale, 
Thorold, Toronto, West Oxford, Willoughby, Vaughan. 

Toronto and Niagara Power Company 

The work of investigating the titles of the various properties owned by 
this and associated companies which came over in the "Clean Up" deal, and 
of transferring the same, was completed during the year. 

In this connection a number of properties necessary for terminal facilities 
in connection with the Metropolitan railway at North Toronto were acquired 
for the Toronto and York Radial railway. 

Wasdells Falls 

All the claims, some thirteen in number, for flooding lands in connection 
with this development, were settled during the year to the satisfaction of 
claimants. 



FIFTEENTH ANNUAL REPORT OF THE No. 49 



Queenston — Hamilton High-Tension Line 

Nearly all of the outstanding right-of-way requirements for this line were 
secured during the year. It was found necessary to purchase a number of 
properties in this connection in the town of Grimsby and in the outskirts of 
St. Catharines where subdivisions had been made. Arrangements also had 
to be made to move a number of buildings from the right-of-way. 

The construction of this line further rendered it necessary to settle a large 
number of claims for damages, especially in the fruit growing districts. 

An additional parcel of land was also secured for the extension of the 
Hamilton station site. 

Negotiations have also been carried on with the City Council of Hamilton 
and with the Parks and Harbour Boards of that city for the right to cross Bur- 
lington bay with this line in order to connect with a previously constructed 
line in the township of East Flamboro'. 

Low-Tension Lines 

In addition to the rural-power and high-tension lines referred to, considerable 
work has been carried on in connection with low-tension work for the purpose 
of supplying power to a number of the smaller urban municipalities. 

The principal lines on which work was carried on in this connection were : 

1. In the town of Trenton 

2. In the town of Bowmanville 

3. At Binkley's Corners 

4. Teeswater to Kinloss 

5. Balderson to Lanark 

6. Morrisburg to Prescott 

7. Brockville to Eugene Phillips' Plant 

8. Preston to Kitchener 

9. York Station to Islington 

10. Grimsby to Beamsville 

11. Dundas to Copetown 

12. Seaforth to Clinton 

13. Newbury to Glencoe 

14. Newbury to Wardsville 

15. Both well to Newbury 

16. Forest to Thedford 

17. Watford to Alvinston 

18. Petrolia to Waterworks 

19. Fletcher to Merlin 

20. Cannington to Greenbank 

21. Greenbank to Port Perry and Uxbridge. 

Nipissing Development 

In connection with the proposed development on the South river it was 
found necessary to acquire a number of parcels of land for flooding purposes. 

Hanover Quarries 

During the year the Commission disposed of the stone quarries in the 
township of Brant and of the Spur Line railway connecting this property with 



1923 HYDRO-ELECTRIC POWER COMMISSION 5 

the Grand Trunk railway. Hanover Stone and Cement, Limited, were the 
purchasers. 

A number of other properties no longer required by the Commission were 
also disposed of. 

Miscellaneous 

The number of transactions carried to completion by the Department 
during the year is as follows : 

Number of parcels of land purchased 51 

Number of tower easements and overhang rights secured 128 

Number of pole easements secured 83 

Number of anchor agreements secured 98 

Number of tree trimming agreements secured 169 

Number of damage claims settled 181 



FIFTEENTH ANNUAL REPORT OF THE No. 49 



SECTION II 

TRANSMISSION SYSTEMS 
NIAGARA SYSTEM 

The principal work in hand at the beginning of the year was the develop- 
ment of the 110, 000- volt lines of the Niagara system so as to connect the 
Queenston generating station with the existing lines and to provide for the 
delivery of the electrical energy from this new plant at points in the Province 
where the demand was increasing most rapidly. The loads of the Toronto and 
Hamilton districts required the most attention. During the year the tie line 
from Queenston generating station to the 110,000-volt trunk lines between 
Niagara Falls and Dundas was completed and put in operation. This line is 
now carrying 200,000 horsepower or more. 

The new trunk line from Queenston generating station by way of Burlington 
Beach, to a point of intersection with the existing trunk lines between Dundas 
and Toronto, north of Burlington, has been completed as far as the new 110,000- 
volt station at East Hamilton and is in operation. 

Negotiations have been carried on practically throughout the year regarding 
the right-of-way in the vicinity of Burlington Beach and along the streets and 
on public property in the city of Hamilton. These negotiations are still active 
and no construction work has been carried out on this section of line. 

An appropriation has been made for preliminary work on a trunk line at 
110,000 volts from Queenston generating station to the St. Thomas district. 

The study of the transmission line network in the vicinity of Niagara Falls 
and Queenston in connection with these and other radiating lines brought out 
very clearly during the year the necessity for some co-ordinated scheme for 
such lines as they become more numerous in the various districts. A study of 
the situation also leads to the conclusion that provision should be made for 
the transportation of electrical energy in the same right-of-way as is already 
used for the transportation of goods and vehicular traffic. Some progress 
has been made in this connection in that two or three municipalities have adopted 
the principle of one-way traffic on pavements, and have approved of the carrying 
of steel structures along the boulevard or planting strip in the centre of a right- 
of-way 66 feet or more in width. In this they follow a practice common in 
foreign countries and one whose underlying principle has led to the development 
of the sketch, reproduced herewith, which indicates the possibilities of carrying 
a paved roadway or preferably one or more suburban trolley tracks within the 
tower area by erecting piers for the support of the tower at each side of the 
tracks or roadway. In the case of the trolley lines, this has a particular ad- 
vantage, since the width of the boulevard or railway right-of-way from curb 
to curb must be sufficient to provide for loading platforms. The piers for the 
towers may either alternate with these loading platforms, which have a spacing 
of 500 to 700 feet, or may be used as supports for a small loading platform as 
indicated. 



1923 



HYDRO-ELECTRIC POWER COMMISSION 




TRANSMISSION LINES— N IAGARA SYSTEM 

Towers on Queenston escarpment wall for high-voltage (110,000 volts) outgoing lines from Nos. 1, 2 
and 3 units in Queenston generating station. October 5, 1922 




Sketch illustrating tentative scheme for using the one right-of-way for pedestrian, vehicular and railway 
traffic and for the transmission of electricity at high voltage 



8 FIFTEENTH ANNUAL REPORT OF THE No. 49 

In order not to spoil good farm land and make it non-productive and a 
menace on account of weeds, tower rights were arranged and the towers erected 
in such a way as to interfere very little with the. agricultural operations. The 
cut reproduced herewith and described as tower No. 117, shows a tree growing 
within the base of the tower. This indicates what may be done in this connection. 

The cut of a semi-anchor tower, 3 degree angle, indicates standard practice 
at small angles for the Queenston-Burlington trunk line which is operated 
at 110,000 volts and which has a rated capacity of 50,000 horsepower per circuit. 

The cut marked "New Welland Ship Canal Crossing," shows another 
section of this line. The conductors are 150 feet above the water. The tower 
in the foreground is 205 feet high. 

Considerable alterations have been made in the grounded wire equipment 
throughout the system. As a result of interruptions to the 110,000-volt system 
on account of sleet storms during the year, it was decided that, where possible, 
all but one, and in some cases all, of these grounded protective wires should be 
removed from the steel towers, since their efficiency as protective equipment 
could not readily be measured and was therefore problematical, and since the 
failure of these ground wires accounts for a very large proportion of the inter- 
ruptions. This work was completed during the year. 

In order to reduce materially the length of time taken to get a system 
covering several hundred miles of territory back into service after it has been 
once interrupted, a considerable study of the communication systems to serve 
these power lines was made and wireless communication of various types was 
adopted during the year. Guided wave wireless has been given some attention. 
By this method emanations from an aerial paralleling the power wires for a 
short distance near the station are transferred to the power conductors. These 
are carried on these wires to some point where they are collected inductively 
on another receiving aerial. Several stations of this type have been installed 
and are giving fair satisfaction. 

In order to increase the range and to eliminate the possibility of inter- 
ruption of communication of this sort with power lines, standard radio distri- 
buting stations are being installed at a number of the more important stations. 

In addition to construction work, a great deal of attention was given the 
purchase of the Toronto and Niagara Power Company and allied organizations 
by the Commission. This purchase involved a great deal of detail work, 
including surveys, checking up of locations and examination of suitability of 
the properties presented for the structures and lines involved. 

EUGENIA SYSTEM 

Considerable difficulty was experienced throughout this system in securing 
undertakings for the cost of revising lines where highway work interfered with 
the transmission structures. The line entrances and switching structures were 
revised at some of the stations, including Hanover. 

WASDELLS SYSTEM 

About 40 miles of low- tension lines were built during the year, the principal 
extension being in the Wasdells system to the south so as to serve municipalities 
in the vicinity of Uxbridge and Port Perry. Apart from these lines, the ex- 
tensions were short and were installed largely to serve customers already located 
near the lines. 



1923 



HYDRO-ELECTRIC POWER COMMISSION 




10 



FIFTEENTH ANNUAL REPORT OF THE 



No. 49 



MUSKOKA SYSTEM 

River crossings were revised and improved on this system, and a con- 
siderable investigation was undertaken, co-operating with the Bell Telephone 
Company in an effort to reduce materially the inductive interference of the 
district. 

ST. LAWRENCE SYSTEM 

A considerable change was undertaken in the St. Lawrence system, where 
the transmission voltage has been changed from 26,400 to 44,000 volts. ij-A 
small extension has been made at this voltage in Brockville so as to serve a 
large power consumer at that point. This revision is still receiving attention 
as the method of transmission is interfering more than ordinarily with the 
operation of communication circuits in the vicinity. 

RIDEAU SYSTEM 

Provision for additional distribution circuits on existing construction, 
revision of some of the air-break switches and special arrangements for the 
connecting in of a stone-crushing plant covers the work carried out during the 
year on this system. 

THUNDER BAY SYSTEM 

The cut marked "Switching Tower at Sibley" shows the switching structure 
and standard pole of the 110,000-volt, 60-cycle system which was completed 
recently between the Nipigon development and the "Twin Cities" at the "Head 
of the Lakes." 




TRANSMISSION LINES— THUNDER BAY SYSTEM 
Switching tower at Sibley on the Nipigon-Port Arthur, 110,000-volt, wood-pole transmission line. 

October 25, 1921 



1923 HYDRO-ELECTRIC POWER COMMISSION 11 



OTTAWA SYSTEM 

There are no lines requiring attention on this system. 

CENTRAL ONTARIO AND TRENT SYSTEM 

After much negotiation with private owners and with the Department of 
Railways and Canals, a connection was made from the new Ranney Falls 
development to the 44,000-volt lines of the system. 

NIPISSING SYSTEM 

Preliminary steps have been taken during the year for reduction of inductive 
interference and for lines to connect up proposed developments. 

GENERAL 

The restringing of a number of the low-tension circuits so as to provide 
larger conductor on account of increased loads and so as to eliminate conductors 
which are found to be of too low tensile strength is proceeding satisfactorily, 
several lines having been changed during the year. 

In Appendix II. will be found tables relating to the different lines and 
systems built and operated by the Commission, or purchased from others. 

The tabulation of lines as found in previous Annual Reports has been 
revised and brought up to date. 

It is interesting to note in connection with these records that there are 
considerably more than 3,000 miles of structures now operating, exclusive of 
the rural districts, and that some 7,000 tons of conductor have been strung by 
the Commission, exclusive of the rural districts and purchases. Approximately 
one-half of this tonnage is strung on the 110,000-volt steel structures of the 
Niagara system. 

DISTRIBUTION SYSTEMS 

At the end of Appendix II, will be found a number of tabular statements 
giving the details of Rural and of Municipal Distribution Systems, Distribution 
Feeders and Metering Stations constructed, or under construction, by the 
Hydro-Electric Power Commission of Ontario up to October 31, 1922. The work 
of rural distribution was initiated consequent on the passing of "The Rural 
Hydro-Electric Distribution Act, 1921," which came into force on June 1, 1921. 
An amending Act — assented to June 13, 1921 — was passed dealing only with 
questions appertaining to the financing of works constructed before or since 
June 1, 1921. The amending Act is given in Appendix I of this Report. 



12 FIFTEENTH ANNUAL REPORT OF THE No. *9 



SECTION III 



OPERATION OF THE SYSTEMS 

The past year's operation of the various systems owned or controlled by 
the Commission has been marked by a great increase in the load. As will be 
seen from reference to the load curves given in this section, the increase has 
been general, occurring on most systems, and being particularly rapid during 
the latter part of the year. 

While this increase in the load is encouraging and gratifying in many 
ways, it has in some respects added materially to the difficulties of operation, 
demanding constant vigilance on the part of the operating staff to see that no 
class of equipment in the numerous stations became overloaded. It made 
efficient operation essential, especially in the generating plants where the demand 
for power frequently threatened to exceed the generating capacity, while at the 
same time it increased the difficulty of getting apparatus out of service long 
enough for inspection, adjustment and necessary repairs. Increasing load 
also affected voltage regulation, demanding constant attention and adjustment. 
These problems have been common to nearly all systems, and the operating 
staff has had a busy year, although the innumerable details of the work cannot 
be given in a report of this nature. In the following sub-sections, dealing 
with the various systems, only outstanding events or changes materially affecting 
the operation of the system are reported. 

As an illustration of the narrow margin of generating capacity over load 
within which the operating staff has been obliged to operate, the case of the first 
generator at Queenston may be mentioned. This unit, after short runs for 
testing and adjusting, was first placed in commercial, continuous service on 
January 26, at 3.08 a.m. On January 27, ice trouble at the plants of the Ontario 
Power Company and Canadian-Niagara Power Company reduced the amount 
of power available from these sources below the amount necessary to supply 
the demand, so that it was necessary to load the Queenston generator to full 
capacity. Had the Queenston unit not been available, it would have been neces- 
sary to restrict the supply of power to consumers. Somewhat similar conditions 
prevailed throughout the season, though not on such a close margin. Reference 
to the graph for Queenston load shows that the plant was called upon to meet 
greater demands each month that an additional generator became available, 
these demands approximating the full capacity of the generators, although the 
Ontario Power Company and the Toronto Power Company continued to carry 
full load, as shown by the load curves for those plants. From this it will be 
evident how. closely the demand for power followed the increased generating 
capacity, how essential it was that no delay occurred in the construction or 
completion of additional generating capacity, and how difficult it was to take 
equipment out of service for maintenance work. 

Reference to the table showing total power generated and capacity of all 
plants will show that the demand for power on other systems, besides the Niagara, 
has closely approached or exceeded the normal generating capacity, leaving 
little margin for operating contingencies or further increase of load, and rendering 
careful operation and maintenance of equipment vitally important. 



1923 



HYDRO-ELECTRIC POWER COMMISSION 



13 



300.000 


































































































o 
















































































































































- z - 
o 

o 




o 
o 






















































































































250,000 




































































































































































































































































































a 




/ 


















































200,000 




















o 


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r 




























































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5 




































































150,000 






* 












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r* 


hs 




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' 






























































100,000 




l 


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k / 


































































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\/ 










































QUEENSTON 
GENERATING STATION - 




/ 






V 












































/ 




































































































PEAK LOADS - 


50,000 








































































































1922 












































































































HYDRO ELECTRIC POWER COMMISSION — 






















































1 1 I 1 1 1 I I 1 I 


G 


JAN. 


FEB. 


MAR 


APR 


MAY 


JUN 

19 


JUL. 

22 


AUG 


SEP. 


OCT. 


NUV 


DEC. 


JAN. 


FEB. 


MAR 


APR 


MAY 


JUN 


JUL. 


AUG 


StP. 


OCT. 


NOV 


DEC. 


JAN. FEB. MAR. APR. MAY JUN. JUL. AUG. SEP. OCT. NOV. DEC. 



200,0 



50.0GO 



In spite of the problems presented by the large increase in demand for 
power, and the difficulties under which the operating staff laboured, as efficient 
and continuous service has been given as was possible under the circumstances, 
and the year's operation on the whole has been very satisfactory. 

Referring to the graphs showing the power demand on the various systems, 
it will be observed that the load rose more rapidly after August. The coal 
famine undoubtedly played a part in this increase, and electric heaters did much 
to relieve the situation where fuel was not obtainable, but it is impossible to 
determine just how much of the increase can be ascribed to this cause. Though 
the fact is not so evident from first inspection of the load curves, due to the 
usual dropping off in load during the summer months, a study of load con : 
ditions reveals that during July and August, when electricity .would not be 
required for heating, there was on most systems a remarkable increase in the 
demand for power over the amounts required in the same months of the previous 
year. The Niagara system shows an increase of over 30,000 horsepower for 
July and August as compared with the same months of the preceding year, 
an increase of about 18 per cent; the Central Ontario system, the next largest, 
shows a growth of over 5,000 horsepower in the same months, or about 24 per 
cent increase; the Ottawa system, 23 per cent; the combined Northern systems, 
16 per cent; the Muskoka system, 24 per cent; the Rideau system, 45 per cent; 
and the Nipissing system, 10 per cent. Due to special conditions, such as large 
power customers, the St. Lawrence system shows a slight decrease during these 
months, and the Thunder Bay system only a slight increase. It is evident, 
therefore, that the growth of load cannot be ascribed, except in a small part, 
to the abnormal conditions arising out of the coal shortage. It is appropriate 
here to remark that published statistics and curves representing comparative 
employment conditions in Canada, show a rapid rise in the number of persons 
employed during the latter part of the year 1922 ; and also that the curve of employ- 
ment and the load curves for most systems resemble each other in the steep 
rise which is manifest towards the end of the year. It is natural that there 
should be some relation between general industrial conditions and the demand 
for power. This is interesting in connection with the operation of hydro-electric 



14 FIFTEENTH ANNUAL REPORT OF THE No. 49 

plants because it indicates that the increase in power requirements during 1922 
is due to an improvement in business conditions, and further that if this improve- 
ment increases, a still greater supply of power will be required and thus make 
heavier demands upon electrical stations and equipment. 

Below is given a table of all the generating stations controlled ,by the 
Commission, showing their total output for the year, and also showing the total 
power purchased. This table shows the immense amount of power being 
handled by the Commission, making it one of the largest power organizations 
in the world — the largest for which figures are at present available. 

In view of the stress which has resulted from coal shortage it is of interest 
to consider what would have been the effect on the people of the province of 
Ontario if it had been necessary to generate from coal the immense amount of 
power produced in hydro-electric plants as shown by the table below. The 
determination of what would have been the exact amount of coal thus required 
would depend upon a variety of governing circumstances, but undoubtedly 
several millions of tons of additional coal would have been required. This 
coal could not have been obtained without encroaching upon the coal required 
for other necessary purposes. The demand for such a large additional amount 
of coal would, inevitably, have added a serious burden to the people of this 
Province, and, further, would have entailed the sending out of the country of 
very large sums of money and placed a load upon railway equipment already 
taxed beyond its capacity. In fact the extra coal could not have been trans- 
ported without seriously interfering with the transport of other commodities. 

In the following table, a column is given headed, "Normal Operating 
Capacity." The capacity of a plant may be given on bases which differ widely, 
so that a few words of explanation seem advisable in case differences are noted 
between figures given in this table and others which may appear in other sections 
of this report. Manufacturer's rating, or nameplate rating, is most generally 
quoted in this connection. Generators and electrical equipment are now usually 
rated in kv-a, and existing power factor or an estimated power factor must be 
taken into the calculation in order to express same in horsepower. In some 
cases manufacturer's rating is given in kw., but this is based on an arbitrarily 
assumed figure for power factor, ranging from 80 per cent to 100 per cent, 
and consequently the horsepower ratings may differ widely for similar machines. 
Moreover, the capacity of the turbines, transformers, or other equipment, may 
affect the total for the plant. Again, the actual available capacity may be con- 
siderably less than figures on the above basis, due to special conditions such as 
equipment out of order, insufficient water and various temporary conditions. 
We have, therefore, selected the normal operating capacity as applying more 
uniformly to the various types of generators and plants, and indicating more 
correctly the power actually available under normal conditions. It is to be 
understood that this table does not give the maximum capacity of the plants, 
nor the output possible for short periods or under unusually favourable con- 
ditions. 

The capacity given for the Ontario Power Company plant is exclusive of 
the two disabled generators, although these were available during the first part 
of the year. The peak load for the year occurred at this plant when all sixteen 
generators were in service. 

The totals given for the peak loads are the arithmetical sums of the indi- 
vidual peaks, without any allowance for diversity. 



1923 



HYDRO-ELECTRIC POWER COMMISSION 



15 



HYDRO-ELECTRIC POWER COMMISSION OF ONTARIO 
TOTAL POWER GENERATED AND PURCHASED 



Plant 



Normal 

operating 

capacity 

horsepower 



Peak load 
horsepower 



Total output 

during fiscal 

year 

kilowatt-hours 



HYDRO-ELECTRIC GENERATING PLANTS 



Queenston (3 units in operation) 

Erindale 

Ontario Power Co 

Toronto Power Co 

Big Chute 

Eugenia Falls 

Wasdells Falls 

South Falls 

High Falls 

Carleton Place 

Cameron Falls -. 

Sidney, Dam No. 2 

Frankford, Dam No. 5 

Ranney Falls, Dam No. 10 

Campbellford, Dam No. 11 

Healey Falls, Dam No. 14 

Auburn, Dam No. 18 

Fenelon Falls, Dam No. 30 

Nipissing 

Totals, hydro-electric plants 



175,000 

800 

171,000 

145,000 

5,760 

6,170 

940 

1,400 

2,400 

400 

26,000 

4,020 

3,485 

9,650 

4,020 

12,060 

2,010 

1,000 

1,740 



178,955 

918 

199,700 

149,410 

5,790 

6,099 

992 

1,464 

2,413 

422 

10,724 

5,362 

3,753 

10,590 

4,370 

15,885 

2,493 

938 

1,696 



292,547,900 

420,850 

731,569,600 

632,618,000 

20,859,880 

13,270,200 

.3,511,089 

5,300,881 

5,471,400 

60,305 

•40,392,000 

18,497,900 

14,353,050 

6,243,360 

16,753,400 

33,030,515 

11,498,850 

3,352,575 

6.238.660 



572,855 



601.974 



1.855.990.415 



Estimated. 



STEAM PLANTS 



Toronto Power Co., Toronto, (peak rating). 
Nipissing system, North Bay 


20,000 
470 


9,380 
Not in 


150,000 
operation 






Totals, steam plants 


20,470 


9,380 


150,000 



POWER PURCHASED 



Plant 


Contract 

amount 

horsepower 


Peak 
horsepower 


Total purchased 
kilowatt-hours 


Canadian Niagara Power Co. . . . 


) 91,000 f 

4,905 

650 

800 

12,000 

1,609 


91,000 

4,905 
1,072 
2,400 
11,394 
2,145 
3,135 
268 
1,675 


320,309,300 


Niagara Falls Power Co. . . . 


56,427,860 


Cedar Rapids Power Co. . . 


14,613,500 


Rideau Power Co 


2,671,006 


Orillia Water, Light & Power Commission . . 

Ottawa & Hull Power and Mfg. Co 

Campbellford Water & Light Commission . . 
Peterboro Hydraulic Power Co 


993,466 

38,801,044 

1,728,490 

1,387,679 


Fenelon Falls Town Plant 


56,010 


Nassau (C.G.E. Co. exchange power) 


318,830 




110,964 


117,994 


437,307,185 


Grand totals 


704,289 


729,348 


2,293,447,600 







Short term agreements. 



16 FIFTEENTH ANNUAL REPORT OF THE No. 49 



NIAGARA SYSTEM 

The most notable and outstanding feature in the operation of the Niagara 
system during the year ended October 31, 1922, was the placing in operation 
of the Queenston plant, the first unit of 60,000 horsepower being placed in 
commercial service January 26, 1922. The second unit of similar capacity was 
available March 16, the third unit on October 3, but even with this large block 
of additional power the Commission is barely able to meet the demand of the 
municipalities. The increase in the system demand was most remarkable, and 
it was very fortunate for the Niagara System municipalities and customers 
that the Queenston plant was available for their demands. The operation of 
the plant was most satisfactory considering the existing conditions in that a 
great amount of construction work was being carried on all the year. 

Early in November, 1921, arrangements were completed with the Niagara 
Falls Power Company to supply the output of two machines, totalling 8,400 
kilowatts, to the Commission's Niagara station, and this capacity was available 
for the Niagara System demands on November 13, 1921. At this time the 
entire available supply from the Niagara plants was in use, and it was fortunate 
for the Hydro customers that conditions on the United States' side of the line 
were such that the Commission was able to secure this additional capacity. 
This supply was discontinued on February 2, 1922, since the No. 1 Queenston 
unit had been placed in service a few days previously. 

The supply of power to the Commission's Niagara step-up station from the 
Ontario Power Company was most satisfactory, although it was necessary for 
a short period following trouble at the Ontario Power Company plant on April 
20, 1922, to obtain 8,400 kilowatts from the Niagara Falls Power Company. 

Due to the winter of 1921-22 being fairly moderate, the Canadian Niagara 
Power Company did not experience extensive trouble from ice conditions, 
and thus the Commission's supply of power to the Niagara step-up station 
from that source was practically constant and continuous. 

During the year power was supplied to the main 110,000-volt switching 
station at Dundas 99.923 per cent, of the total time, and had it not been for the 
severe sleet and ice storms of February 22 and March 31, the outage would 
have been practically nil. The storm of February 22 and 23 hit the 110,000-volt 
lines between Niagara and Dundas, practically all the lines in the Dundas, 
Guelph, Preston, Kitchener, Stratford, St. Marys, Brantford and Woodstock 
districts, and to a lesser extent the lines in the London district, while the St. 
Thomas, Chatham and Windsor districts escaped intact. The storm was the 
worst in the history of the Commission up to that time, and the damage caused 
to power and communication circuits was very extensive. The storm of March 
31 exceeded in severity that of February 22, causing damage to towers, poles 
and conductors proportionately greater. Following so closely on the February 
22 storm, before the repairs made necessary by that storm had been completed 
and covering much the same territory, the storm was much the worst ever 
experienced by the Commission in its twelve years of operation. Old operating 
men report they can recall no occasion when the ice conditions approached 
those experienced at this time in the districts involved. 

During the year sixty-four electrical storms were experienced on fifty-two 
days, the first occurring on February 19, and the last on October 10. Sixteen 
of the storms were of a general nature, traversing the entire system, while five 



1923 HYDRO-ELECTRIC POWER COMMISSION 17 

were very severe. The fact that very little equipment was damaged during 
the lightning season shows quite conclusively that the lightning protection 
installed on the system was equal to the task of relieving the system of dangerous 
voltage surges. 

In anticipation of increased demands on a number of our transformer 
stations, extensive changes have been carried out and the transformer capacity 
increased. At London high-tension station a bank of three 5,000-kv-a. trans- 
formers replaced a bank of three 2,500-kv-a. units; at Guelph high-tension 
station the 2,500-kv-a. bank from London replaced a 1,250-kv-a. bank; at Preston 
high-tension station a 1,250-kv-a. bank replaced a 750-kv-a. bank and the 6,600- 
volt distribution from this point was discontinued in favour of 13,200-volt 
distribution; at Kent high-tension station a bank of three 2,500-kv-a. trans- 
formers replaced the bank of three 1,250-kv-a. transformers; at Essex high- 
tension station the capacity was increased by the addition of a bank of three 
5,000-kv-a. transformers. 

The first 110, 000- volt out-door type station, with an initial capacity of 
15,000 kv-a. was successfully placed in commercial service on October 8, 1922. 
This station is located in the east end of Hamilton and supplies a portion of the 
Hamilton load. 

Changes in transformer capacity were made at a number of distributing 
stations as follows: The 75-kv-a. transformer at Milverton station was replaced 
with a 150-kv-a. bank; at Oil Springs, one 150-kv-a. three-phase transformer 
replaced one 75-kv-a. three-phase unit; at Watford one 150-kv-a. three phase 
transformer replaced one 50-kv-a. three-phase unit. 

The load supplied from the Mimico station was transferred to the Etobi- 
coke station and the Mimico station abandoned for the present. 

The Dominion Sugar Company station, Saltfleet station, the Streetsville 
Lumber Company station, and the Gait, Preston & Hespeler Railway station 
at Preston, were satisfactorily placed in service, and power was supplied Port 
Dover, Brantford Sand & Gravel Company, Alvinston and Thedford from 
existing substations. 

The line maintenance field force has been actively engaged in carrying out 
the numerous routine duties necessary in the maintenance and upkeep of hun- 
dreds of miles of transmission lines of varying voltages and capacities. These 
lines are all patrolled at stated intervals and minor repairs effected by the 
patrolmen who are located at suitable points on the system. Considerable 
tree trimming is carried on during the early spring and on all lines along the 
provincial highways the trimming is done under the supervision of the Pro- 
vincial Forester. During the summer months the insulation of a number of 
the 110,000-volt lines was checked, this involving the testing of 162,918 units, 
of which 1.8 per cent, proved defective and were replaced. A considerable staff 
was employed in carrying out changes and revisions to low-tension feeders 
brought about by Provincial Highway construction, and in effecting repairs to 
lines damaged during the ice storms of February 22, and March 31. The double 
circuiting of the 110,000-volt lines from Dundas to Kitchener was completed 
early in the year. The work of removing all ground cable from the 110,000-volt 
lines, with the exception of one cable carried on the peak of the tower, and the 
reinforcing of the loops on the 110,000-volt lines between Niagara and Toronto 
has been actively pressed and it is expected to have same completed early in 
the coming year. 

The station maintenance field staff have been fully employed in maintaining 
the many Commission properties and buildings with their equipment necessary 



18 



FIFTEENTH ANNUAL REPORT OF THE 



No. 49 



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1923 



HYDRO-ELECTRIC POWER COMMISSION 



19 



in the transformation and distribution of power to the large number of munici- 
palities and customers in the district comprising the entire south-western portion 
of the province. A few of the many duties performed by this staff consist of 
the periodic overhauling of oil breakers, batteries, transformers, lightning arrest- 
ers, pumps, condensers and the repairing of transformers and other equipment 
which fail in service. 

NIAGARA SYSTEM— LOADS OF MUNICIPALITIES, 1920 TO 1922 



Municipality 



Peak load in 
horsepower 



Oct., 1920 Oct., 1921 Oct., 1922 



Change 
1921- 



in load, 
1922 



Decrease 



Increase 



Acton 

Ailsa Craig. 

Aylmer 

Ayr 



Baden 

Beachville. . 
Blenheim. . . 

Bolton 

Bothwell. . . 
Brampton . . 
Brantford . . 
Brigden .... 
Burford .... 
Burgessville. 



Caledonia 

Chatham 

Chippawa Village. 

Clinton 

Comber 

Cooksville 



Dashwood 

Delaware 

Dereham Township. 

Dixie 

Dorchester 

Drayton 

Dresden 

Drumbo 

Dublin 

Dundas 

Dunnville 

Dutton 



Elmira. 

Elora 

Embro 

Essex County System. 
Etobicoke Township. . 
Exeter 



Fergus . 
Forest . . 



Gait 

Georgetown 

Glencoe 

Goderich 

Grantham Township.. 

Granton 

Guelph 

Central Prison Farm 

Ontario Agricultural College 



193.0 
128.6 
172.0 

77.2 

175.6 

223.0 

134.0 

105.9 

120.6 

965.0 

4,162.0 

107.1 

37.8 

42.4 

83.0 
2,151.5 



154.0 
135.4 



52.6 
11.7 



89.8 



48. 
196. 

21. 

45. 

1,132. 

241. 

107. 



213.0 
194.3 
58.4 
1,126.0 
335.0 
175.6 

185.0 
116.0 

2,931.5 

524.0 

67.5 

496.0 

26.0 

67.7 

3,638.0 

160.8 

166.2 



229.2 

134.0 

194.3 

71.0 

167.5 

221.0 

156.8 

132.7 

116.3 

969.0 

4,866.0 

111.2 

53.6 

43.8 

106.4 
2,240.0 

98.0 
170.2 
102.4 

80.4 

50.2 
16.0 



59 

80 

30 

59 
196 

20 

45 
921.0 
282.8 
111.2 

240.0 
202.6 
60.3 
1,213.0 
431.6 
186.3 

245.3 
136.7 

3,485.2 

496.0 

74.5 

439.6 

35.9 

64.0 

4,249.3 

136.7 

187.6 



261.3 

112.6 

217.7 

84.4 

155.5 

268.0 

202.4 

122.7 

124.0 

1,072.3 

5,811.0 

35.5 

58.7 

45.5 

118.0 
3,056.3 

79.0 
186.3 

99.0 
100.8 

43.7 
16.6 
62.4 

100.8 
21.4 
56.3 

177.0 

35.1 

30.2 

1,024.0 

348.5 

115.2 

415.5 
272.0 
63.5 
2,250.6 
663.5 
232.0 

295.0 
133.5 

4,222.5 

536.0 

79.8 

510.7 

46.3 

62.9 

4,689.0 

191.0 

221.0 



32.1 

23^4 
13.4 



47.0 
45.6 

Y.l 
103.3 
945.0 

' SA 
1.7 

11.6 
816.3 

16^1 

20^4 



0.6. 

3.2 

20.4* 



14.8 



103.0 

65.7 

4.0 



175.5 

69.4 

3.2 

1,037.6 

231.9 

45.7 



49.7 



737.3 

40.0 

5.3 

71.1 

10.4 

439^7 
54.3 
33.4 



20 



FIFTEENTH ANNUAL REPORT OF THE 



No. 49 



sanoH-iivMcma 



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923 



HYDRO-ELECTRIC POWER COMMISSION 



21 



NIAGARA SYSTEM— LOADS OF MUNICIPALITIES, 1920 TO 1922— Continued 



Municipality 



Peak load in 
horsepower 



Oct., 1920 Oct., 1921 Oct., 1922 



Change 
1921- 



in load, 
-1922 



Decrease 



Increase 



Hagersville 

Hamilton 

Harriston 

Hensall 

Hespeler 

Highgate 

Humberstone 

Ingersoll 

Kitchener 

Lambeth 

Listowel 

London 

Lucan 

Lynden 

Markham 

Merritton 

Milton 

Milverton 

Mimico 

Mimico Asylum 

Mitchell 

Montrose Sta., Chippawa Dev'nt. 

Moorefield 

Mount Brydges 

Newbury 

New Hamburg 

New Toronto 

Niagara Falls 

Niagara-on-the-Lake 

Norwich 

Oil Springs 

Otterville 

Palmerston 

Paris 

Parkhill 

Petersburg and St. Agatha 

Petrolia 

Plattsville 

Port Colborne 

Port Credit.. 

Port Dalhousie 

Port Robinson 

Port Stanley 

Preston 

Preston Rural 

Princeton 

Provincial Brick Yard 

Queenston 

Ridgetown 

Rockwood 

Rodney 



260.0 

17,895.0 

227.8 

85.7 
348.5 

86.0 



1,085.7 

6,648.8 

22.7 

453.0 

10,656.8 

216.6 

87.8 

37.0 

670^6 
290.8 
388.7 
37.5 
195.7 



123 
23 



236.0 

3,284.2 

3,610.0 

229.2 

223.0 

95.0 
•33.5 

191.6 
643.4 
48.2 
17.0 
442.3 
100.5 
270.0 
103.2 
144.7 

124io 
1,485.2 

i5!<5 

123.3 



173.6 
41.2 
91.6 



431.6 
16,837.4 

193.0 
49.3 

453.0 
85.8 
56.0 

91.1.5 

7,171.6 

26.2 

482.5 

12,392.7 

185.0 

76.4 

61.0 
217.0 

737 
207 



2 
7 
551.0 



37. 

195. 

6,434. 

49. 

30. 



22.7 

248.0 

1,356.5 

3,706.4 

197.0 

277.4 

171.5 
39.4 

227.8 

703.7 

57.6 

26.8 

449.0 

32.0 

332.0 

138.0 

143.4 

314.0 

193.0 

1,599.2 

96.5 

17.9 

147.4 

25.4 

201.0 

42.8 
103 . 2 



536.0 
21,542.0 

171.5 
60.7 

509.3 
73.4 
55.0 

1,323.0 

7,868.6 

42.9 

394.0 

16,422.0 

116.6 

83.0 



83 
273 
923 
340 
812 

37 

241 

2,237.0 

47.5 

30.1 

21.4 

277.4 

1,863.3 

4,646.0 

205.4 

360.5 

223.8 
44.2 

202.4 
904.8 

65.2 

25.2 
536.0 

28.1 
398.0 
186.3 
152.8 
314.0 
144.7 
2,024.0 
110.4 

24.0 
160.8 

37.5 

249.8 

50.4 

110.2 



21.5 



12.4 
1.0 



88.5 
68*4 



4,197.3 
2.1 
0.4 

1.3 



25.4 

1.6 

3^9 

48^3 



104.4 
4,704.6 

56.3 



411.5 

697.0 

16.7 

4,029^3 

6^6 

22.6 

56.4 

186.3 

132.7 

261.3 

45^5 



29.4 
506.8 
939.6 ' 
8.4. 

83.1 

52.3 ' 
4.8 



201.1 
7.6 

87!6 

66.0 

48.3 

9.4 



424.8 

13.9 

6.1 

13.4 

12.1 

48.8 
7.6 
7.0 



22 



FIFTEENTH ANNUAL REPORT OF THE 



No. 49 



NIAGARA SYSTEM— LOADS OF MUNICIPALITIES, 1920 TO 1922— Continued 



Municipality 



Peak load in 
horsepower 



Oct., 1920 Oct., 1921 Oct., 1922 



Change in load, 
1921-1922 



Decrease 



Increase 



St. Catharines 

St. George 

St. Jacobs 

St. Marys 

St. Thomas 

Sarnia 

Scarboro Township . 

Seaforth , 

Simcoe 

South Dorchester. . 

Springfield 

Stamford Township 

Stratford 

Strathroy 

Streetsville 

Tavistock 

Thamesford 

Thamesville , 

Thorndale 

Tilbury 

Tillsonburg 

Toronto 

Toronto Township . 

Walkerville. 

Wallaceburg 

Wardsville 

Waterdown 

Waterford 

Waterloo 

Watford 

Welland 

Wellesley 

West Lome 

Weston 

Windsor 

Woodbridge 

Woodstock , 

Wyoming 

Zurich . . 



,477.0 
60.3 
88.4 
878.0 
,417.0 
,795.0 



281 
214 



423.5 
,024.0 
387.4 



264.0 

83.0 

62.7 

110.0 

131.3 

819.0 

59,598.0 



3,686.3 
871.0 

104 '. 5 
138.6 

1,214.4 
72.3 

3,103.2 
114.0 
122.0 
927.6 

4,037.0 
146.0 

1,643.5 
41.5 

80.6 



3,720.0 

86.4 

75.0 

918.2 

2,658.0 

3,002.7 

242.0 

242.6 

336.4 

6.7 

16.0 

465.0 

2,372.6 

378.0 

246.6 

262.7 
105.2 
83.0 
107.7 
148.7 
325.7 
68,573.7 
284.7 

3,311.0 

486.5 

10.0 

110.8 

143.4 

1,327.0 
67.9 

1,359.0 
124.6 
166.2 
899.4 

6,266.7 
182.3 

1,988.0 
40.2 

77.8 



5,120.0 

60.3 

32.0 

744.0 

3,025.4 

3,526.0 

366.9 

308.3 

430.3 

6.7 

24.7 

761.3 

3,760.0 

454.0 

329.7 

127.3 
87.0 
79.0 
66.8 

203.7 

368.3 
87,600.5 

405.0 

4,705.0 

864.6 

12.8 

112.0 

187.6 

1,525.4 
96.0 

1,675.7 
127.3 
194.3 

1,402.0 

9,001.3 
165.0 

2,260.0 
39.4 

84.3 



26 

43 

174 



135 

18 

4 

40 



1,400.0 



367.4 

523.3 

124.9 

65.7 

93.9 

'8'.7 

296.3 

1,387.4 

76.0 

83.1 



55.0 

42.6 

19,026.8 

120.3 

1,394.0 

378.1 

2.8 

1.2 

44.2 

198.4 

28.1 

316.7 

2.7 

28.1 

502.6 

2,734.6 

272.6 



6.5 



NIAGARA SYSTEM— NEW MUNICIPALITIES 





Municipality 


Date 
connected 


Load in horsepower 


Increase 
in horse- 




Initial 


Oct., 1922 


power 


Alvinston 


Mar. 22, 1922 
Dec. 22, 1921 
May 18, 1922 


40.2 
65.6 
33.5 


83.3 
73.7 
42.6 


43 1 


Port Dover 


8.1 


Thedford 


9 1 







1923 HYDRO-ELECTRIC POWER COMMISSION 23 

ONTARIO POWER COMPANY 

The favourable weather during last winter enabled the Ontario Power 
Company plant to be operated with little or no interference from ice and no 
serious curtailment of power was occasioned at any time. However, the usual 
preparations for the maintenance of equipment damaged by ice were made, 
although fortunately not required. 

By improvements in the system of heating at the forebay a saving of over 
40 tons of coal was made during the winter. Enough in fact to make it unneces- 
sary to purchase any coal at all during the current year, the balance on hand 
being sufficient to rneet the anticipated use for the winter of 1922-1923. 

The method of disposing of ice in the screen house during the winter months 
has been greatly improved by the erection of a curtain wall which cuts off heavy 
cross current at the ice disposal chute. The quantity of ice that can now be 
handled has been increased many times and the labour formerly required has 
been almost entirely eliminated. The cost of these improvements has been 
very small and the entire expense saved in one month's operation. Experience 
to date has shown that the improved ice disposal chute will not only decrease 
the cost of handling ice during the winter months but will eliminate most of the 
ice that formerly could not be prevented from passing through the turbines. 

On April 20, an accident totally destroyed No. 15 generator, badly wrecked 
No. 16 unit and occasioned the temporary shut-down of four other machines 
in the plant. Following a heavy short-circuit, No. 15 generator water wheel 
ran away and attained a speed at which the generator rotor burst. A com- 
prehensive and thorough investigation has shown beyond reasonable doubt 
that the cause of the failure of the generator was defective castings in the rotor 
rims. The generator, which had been purchased on the most exacting specifica- 
tions and which was built during the recent war, was designed to withstand a 
runaway speed about 10 per cent in excess of the maximum speed of the water 
wheel, but due to the failure of the rim castings to meet requirements, it went to 
pieces. The bursting of No. 15 generator caused the collapse of the roof trusses,- 
bringing down the heavy concrete roof, which knocked a large piece from the 
turbine casing of this unit, allowing water to be discharged into the power house 
for about four minutes. The prompt closing of the main penstock vatve on the 
damaged turbine prevented the entire power house 'from being flooded, and 
showed conclusively that a valve of modern design could be closed safely and 
quickly with practically free discharge through a penstock 10 ft. 6 in. in dia- 
meter. The generator that failed was not tested to runaway speed when first 
installed in 1919 due to load conditions which made such a test inadvisable. 
Had this test been made the machine would, no doubt, have gone to pieces 
with disastrous results, as at that time it would have been impossible to have 
obtained sufficient power to meet the loss of output from the damaged machines, 
either from Queenston station, which was hardly under construction in 1919, 
or from purchased power. Serious as this accident was, it did not, however, 
interfere in any way with the power supply to the Commission's customers. 
The trouble occurred at 2.44 a.m., and by 7.30 a.m. generating capacity was 
available to replace the damaged equipment and to carry the day's load. The 
generating capacity disabled amounted to 25,000 kilowatts, while 40,000 kilo- 
watts was temporarily put out of service from the flooding of four generators. 
The total loss in output was, therefore, 65,000 kilowatts. In replacing this power 
supply, use was made of existing tie lines between the Ontario Power Company's 
plants and the stations of the Toronto Power Company, Canadian Niagara 



24 



FIFTEENTH ANNUAL REPORT OF THE 



No. 49 



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H3MOd3SHOH 



1923 



HYDRO-ELECTRIC POWER COMMISSION 



25 



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sanoH-nvMOiiM 



26 FIFTEENTH ANNUAL REPORT OF THE No. 49 

Power Company and the Niagara Falls Power Company. By the co-operation 
of these companies, who fortunately had generating capacity available, and 
with the assistance of the Niagara, Lockport and Ontario Power Company, 
it was possible to make good the power shortage before the day load came on, 
so that no customers were inconvenienced. 

The generators damaged by water were started drying out at the earliest 
possible moment and three of the machines were placed in service after being 
dried out and tested. The fourth machine was completely rewound, the sal- 
vaged coils being dried out after removal from the machine and returned to 
storage as spares. 

During the early spring trouble developed on No. 1 nine-foot valve, apparently 
due to the failure of the operating screws. It was decided that new screws 
and nuts would be required for this valve, and as valves Nos. 2, 3, 4, 5 and 6 
had been in service the same length of time, it was thought advisable to replace 
the nuts in them and to clean out the accumulated sand and gravel in the bon- 
nets of the valves. This programme of work required a shut-down of No. 1 
pipe line which feeds the first six units in the plant. All of the work was carried 
out successfully, and while the condition of the screws and nuts was such as to 
make necessary the immediate replacement of the nuts and will require renewal 
of the screws in a short time, the permanent structure of the valves was found 
to be in good condition. 

During the interval No. 1 pipe line was shut down for these repairs, a com- 
plete inspection of its interior was made. 

The No. 1 pipe line is a steel conduit 18 feet in diameter built of 3^2 mcn 
rolled plate incased in a 12 inch concrete envelope. It is 6,500 feet long and 
sweeps in a long curve from the head works above the upper Niagara rapids 
to the power house just below the falls. The pipe line, head gate and penstock 
valves were placed in operation in 1905 and have been continuously used since 
that time. The pipe line was un watered in 1908 for repairs to the valves and 
again in 1914 for a brief inspection. Conditions this year are then the result 
of 17 years use, and as such it might reasonably have been expected that the 
equipment would show noticeable evidence of wear and tear from use. The 
head gate cannot, of course, be completely closed except when the pipe is shut 
down, and although it is operated a short distance each week to make sure 
everything is in satisfactory working condition, there was no way of telling 
how it would close completely when required. The closing operation on this 
shut-down was perfect and the leakage through the gate not more than when 
it was first installed. The pipe line was found in equally good condition. A 
slight oxidation of the surface of the iron was to be noted, but there was no evi- 
dence of progressive rusting; in fact, in places the original mill scale was still 
quite apparent on the surface of the plates. Test holes cut through the concrete 
on the outside of the pipe showed that it was still in the same condition as when 
erected. There is no doubt that unless some unforeseen accident should occur 
this pipe line has a life fully equal to that of any other part of the plant. 

Although no other -noteworthy changes in equipment were made during 
the past year, a large number of improvements, unimportant in themselves, 
but on the whole tending towards more efficient and safer operation of the plant, 
were made. The usual high standards of maintenance have been kept up so 
that the condition of the plant at the end of this financial year leaves little to 
be desired. 

There were no fatal accidents to employees during the year and only one 
serious accident, in which a workman met with a compound fracture of the arm. 



1923 



HYDRO-ELECTRIC POWER COMMISSION 



27 



TORONTO POWER COMPANY 

The purchase of the Toronto Power Company and allied interests was 
finally consummated on November 1, 1922, and full control was taken by the 
Commission on this date. The properties, however, were operated in trust for 
the Commission from December 1, 1920. From that date to November 1, 
1922, the operation was carried on by the officials of the old company in the 
same manner as previous to December 1, 1920, except that any changes in plant 
were submitted to the Commission for approval. 

Several severe storms during the year, causing considerable damage to 
the 90,000-volt transmission lines from Niagara Falls to Toronto, resulted in 
several protracted power interruptions. This was further aggravated by lack 
of communication. In order to overcome this difficulty, the Toronto Power 
Company in March, 1922, commenced the installation of five radio telephone 
stations along their main transmission lines, these stations being located at 
Niagara Falls, Twenty-mile Creek, Burlington, Port Credit and Toronto. 
Due to delays in delivery of material, this installation has not been entirely 
completed, but final shipment has arrived and it is expected that it will be 
installed and in operation before the end of the calendar year. 

The generating station of the Electrical Development Company at Niagara 
Falls was operated to capacity during most of the year, furnishing considerable 
power to the Commission's Niagara system during periods of shortage. 



300,000 



250,000 



200,000 



100,000 























"~1 


—} 










I 






























































TORONTO POVA/FR OOMPANV 






















































































GENERATING PLANT AT NIAGARA 










































PFAK I OAD^ 




















































































1920- 1921 - 1922 














































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































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JAN 


FEB 


MAR 


APR 


MAY 


JUN 
19 


JUL. 

20 


AUG 


SEP 


OCT 


NOV 


DEC. 


JAN 


FEB 


MAR 


APR 


MAV 


JUN 
19 


JUL. 
21 


AUG 


SEP 


OCT 


NOV 


DEC 


JAN 


FEB 


MAR 


APR 


MA\ 


JUN 

19 


JUL 

22 


AUG 


SEP 


OCT 


NOV 


DEC. 



300.000 



250,000- 



150,000 



100,000 



50,000 



28 FIFTEENTH ANNUAL REPORT OF THE No. 49 



COMBINED NORTHERN SYSTEMS 

The most outstanding feature of the year's operation has been the general 
increase in load. The demand for power from the municipalities on the Eugenia, 
Severn and Wasdells systems increased in the majority of cases, as will be seen 
from the table of loads given in this section, and the demand of the combined 
systems during the fiscal year increased from 10,979 horsepower to 13,277 horse- 
power, an increase of 21 per cent. 

This increase in load has taxed the Commission's generating plants to the 
limit of their capacity, and made it more difficult to take equipment out of 
service for repair or maintenance. Where such work would take out any equip- 
ment reducing the plant output, it has been necessary to carry out the work 
during light load periods and in many cases to purchase power. 

Due to the low precipitation during the summer and fall months, the 
storage in the various lakes feeding the Severn river was depleted to a point 
where some anxiety was felt, the operators being faced with a reduced supply 
of water on the one hand and an increased demand for power on the other. 

The Commission's engineers had foreseen the probable increase in power 
requirements and steps were taken early in the summer to conserve water for 
power development as much as possible. During low-load periods on the Severn 
and Wasdells systems considerable power was generated at the Big Chute and 
Wasdells plants, and transferred to the Eugenia system, thus utilizing water 
that would otherwise have been wasted over the dams and permitting water 
in the Eugenia storage basin to be conserved for use when loads were heavier, 
or in case of trouble at any plant. The importance of this arrangement lies in 
the fact that the water in the Eugenia basin is stored for development of power 
only, and is completely under the control of the Commission, so that water 
not required for power can be held until such time as it may be needed, whereas 
on the Severn river the question of navigation enters into the problem, water 
levels must be maintained and the regulation of the flow is outside of the Com- 
mission's control, although the Dominion government engineers in charge of 
stream flow and storage elevations on the Severn river have co-operated with 
the Commission's engineers to safeguard as far as possible the interest of power 
consumers. 

In addition to conserving water by the above means, power was purchased 
from the Orillia Commission which had surplus capacity in its plant at Swift 
Rapids. Power was purchased from this plant during November, December, 
April, May, July, August, September and October. In August an arrangement 
was made with the Orillia Commission for the supply of a minimum of 800 
horsepower. In order to assist the Commission in meeting peak loads and 
conserving water, the Orillia Water, Light and Power Commission has co- 
operated whenever possible by supplying power considerably in excess of the 
contract requirements. 

By the above means the Commission's plants have been able to meet the 
remarkable increase in the demand for power, and to end the current fiscal 
year in a good position to meet the heavier demand of the winter. A study of 
load and water conditions shows that if these measures had not been adopted, 
both the Eugenia and Severn systems would have suffered a power shortage. 
The interconnection and operation of the Eugenia, Severn and Wasdells systems 
as a combined unit has proven this year not only mutually advantageous, but 
necessary if unrestricted service was to be given. 



1923 HYDRO-ELECTRIC POWER COMMISSION 29 

In reference to the advantages of combined operation, it may be added 
that in April and May, when one unit at the Big Chute was out of service for 
temporary repairs, and again in July and August when permanent repairs were 
being made, it would have been impossible to supply the demand of the Severn 
system municipalities from the Big Chute plant, but by means of the inter- 
connection between the systems, including the Swift Rapids plant, it was possible 
to carry all load without interruptions or restrictions. 

SEVERN SYSTEM 

The growth in the Severn System demand, which now exceeds the capacity 
of the generating plant, has kept the Big Chute plant heavily loaded. This has 
rendered it difficult to get equipment out of service long enough for extensive 
overhauling or repairs, but advantage has been taken of such opportunities as 
have occurred, and, on the whole, the plant has been maintained in good oper- 
ating condition. 

On April 30 the shaft broke in the 2,300 horsepower turbine, but fortunately 
the machine was brought to a stop before any other damage resulted. Temporary 
repairs were completed, and the unit put back into operation on May 12. During 
this period the capacity of the Big Chute plant was, of course, seriously reduced, 
but power was obtainable from the Eugenia plant, Wasdells plant, and from 
the Swift Rapids plant of the Orillia Commission, so that the Severn munici- 
palities suffered no restrictions in their power supply. The breakage was shown 
to be due to a defect in the shaft, and the manufacturer supplied a new shaft 
without charge. Installation of this new shaft was commenced on July 14, 
and completed August 9, 1922. While the unit was shut down, arrangements 
were made for the supply of power similar to those made during the temporary 
repairs in May. 

The outside of the penstocks and the gatehouse at this plant, also one of 
the operator's cottages, were given a coat of paint. 

In September, 1922, a 22,000-volt double-circuit line was built to serve 
the Tiffin elevator of the Canadian National Railways at Midland, the new 
line tapping off the main transmission line south of Midland. A transformer 
station, stepping down from 22,000 volts to 550 volts, was built on the Railway 
property alongside the former steam plant. This customer's power require- 
ments added materially to the system load. 

Where the main transmission line from the Big Chute plant crosses Matche- 
dash bay at Waubaushene, the steel towers and pole structures were given a 
coat of paint. This crossing includes three steel towers ranging from 90 feet 
to 180 feet high, and four wood-pole structures. 

Owing to highway construction, it was necessary to alter our lines or move 
poles at several points during the year. In nearly all cases, sufficient notice of 
road work was received so that it was possible to make arrangements beforehand 
to avoid interruptions to service. 

Sleet storms of February 22 and March 31, which were so severe in other 
parts of Ontario, were not so heavy in the Severn district and lines suffered 
no damage. 

In order to ensure continuous telephone communication between operating 
headquarters at Waubaushene and the Big Chute plant, the No. 6 copper-clad 
steel telephone conductor at the Waubaushene crossing was taken down in the 
latter part of February, and replaced with a % inch seven-strand steel cable. 
The No. 6 wire had proven too weak on the long spans under ice and sleet 



30 



FIFTEENTH ANNUAL REPORT OF THE 



No. 49 



conditions, and was liable to cause extended interruptions to service by involving 
the power conductors, which are difficult to repair on these high, long spans. 
The work of restringing, re-insulating and replacing cross-arms and poles 
where necessary, on the "A" circuit between Big Chute and Waubaushene, 
was completed early in this fiscal year. Larger conductors were put up, which 
facilitates operation and maintenance by allowing the load to be carried by the 
new circuit alone, so that the second circuit can be taken out of service for 
repairs. Previously this was not always possible. The wooden pole structures 
crossing the Black river and some of the long swamp spans were rebuilt to a new 
design to give more clearance and strength and the locations were changed 
somewhat so as to be more accessible for patrol and maintenance. 

SEVERN SYSTEM— LOADS OF MUNICIPALITIES, 1920 TO 1922 



Municipality 



Peak load in 
horsepower 



Oct., 1920 



Oct., 1921 



Oct., 1922 



Change 
1921- 



in load, 
1922 



Decrease 



Increase 



Alliston 

Barrie 

Beeton 

Bradford 

Camp Borden. . . 

Coldwater 

Collingwood. . . . 

Cookstown 

Creemore 

Elmvale 

Midland 

Penetang 

Port McNicol . . . 

Stayner 

Thornton 

Tottenham 

Victoria Harbour 

Waubaushene . . . 



132.7 

750.6 
89.0 

52.2 

139.4 
49.5 

1,286.8 
55.0 
45.8 

111.2 

1,362.0 

900.8 
36.0 

184.0 

12.0 
31.2 

48.2 

26.1 



143.0 

828.4 
86.4 
69.4 

234.5 
56.3 

811.0 
75.0 

45.8 

124.6 
1,108.5 

504.0 

44.7 

120.6 

14.3 
38.2 

46.0 

24.0 



119.0 

1,057.6 
89.6 
70.6 

234.5 

108.5 

1,161.0 

36.0 

56.3 

136.7 

1,583.0 

811.0 
49.5 

112.6 

14.0 
35.3 

47.0 

26.5 



24.0 



39 



229.2 
3.2 
1.2 



52.2 
350.0 

l6'5 

12.1 

474.5 

307.0 
4.8 



1.0 

2.5 



EUGENIA SYSTEM 



The power demand of the Eugenia System municipalities has increased 
during the year, the growth being more marked during the last months. 

In November, 1921, taking advantage of the low load period over the 
Thanksgiving holiday, repairs to the pipe line at Eugenia were carried out. 
Arrangements were made for the transfer of power from the Severn and Was- 
dells systems and from the Swift Rapids plant, and the municipalities were 
asked to restrict their motor load, Owen Sound operating its steam plant for 
the same purpose. As most power customers shut down for the holiday, this 
caused little inconvenience, and no restrictions were placed on the lighting load. 
The Eugenia plant was closed down at midnight on Saturday, and repairs 



1923 HYDRO-ELECTRIC POWER COMMISSION 31 

rushed through by night and day work so that the plant was again available 
to meet power requirements Tuesday morning. About 100 feet of the wood- 
stave pipe line, where it passed through an earth fill, had deteriorated, and 
this was repaired by building in a new section. The remainder of the pipe line 
was found to be in fair condition and required only minor repairs, such as placing 
extra bands and plates here and there where stave ends had sprung, and replacing 
a few staves at several points. The expansion joint in the steel pipe section 
just below the surge tank was examined and the packing replaced, reducing 
leakage at this point. 

Advantage was taken of the load condition during the spring months to 
make some further improvements in the design of No. 1 turbine in the Eugenia 
plant, and a further increase in efficiency resulted. These changes were com- 
pleted in June and the unit put back into service. The machine has since 
operated very satisfactorily, requiring less water for the same power output, 
thus assisting in conserving the water supply, a matter of increasing importance 
due to the growth of load. 

Various minor adjustments and repairs were made at the plant, the surge 
tank and supporting structure were painted, and the power house and equip- 
ment generally maintained in a condition of high efficiency. 

At Hanover an outdoor type switching station was constructed and put 
into operation on January 8, necessary alterations being made in the lines to 
connect them into the new structure, the line running north to Elmwood and 
Chesley being brought back three-quarters of a mile for this purpose. This 
switching station was required to give proper operating control of the lines to 
the Bruce County extension and to Elmwood and Chesley, and to permit service 
being given from either of the two supply lines at this point. Three electrically 
operated, 300-ampere, oil circuit-breakers were installed, together with relays, 
so that in case of trouble developing on lines beyond Hanover, the defective 
section will be cut out automatically without interrupting service to other 
sections and customers. 

The Hanover distributing station was extended to accommodate the low- 
tension switchboards and the local commission's condenser, the high-tension 
equipment remaining in the old section of the building. The entrance structure 
was remodelled, and the Hanover local line and the Neustadt feeder re-arranged, 
and brought into the new section of the station. 

An operator has been located permanently at Hanover to look after the 
Hanover transformer station, to operate the condenser of the local commission, 
and to do any necessary switching at the Hanover switching station. This 
has greatly facilitated the operation of the lines in this section. 

At Durham a new substation was erected and put into operation on April 
30, to serve the John E. Russell Company. This is an out-door, pole-type 
transformer station with three 100-kv-a., 22,500/550-volt transformers. This 
station is connected into the Durham-Mount Forest line at pole No. 1,007 
in Durham. 

On the morning of July 11, about 3 a.m., the out-door, pole-type station 
at Elmwood was destroyed by fire, which had its origin in a garage adjacent to 
the station. Fortunately the power transformer was not damaged. Service 
was restored in the evening of the same day by means of temporary connections. 
The pole structure was rebuilt and new equipment installed as soon as delivery 
of material could be obtained. 

Additional telephone protective equipment was installed at Hanover and 
Mount Forest. 



32 



FIFTEENTH ANNUAL REPORT OF THE 



No. 49 



At Kincardine the size of the high-tension fuse was increased and the current 
transformers on the low-tension relays were altered to give more selective 
operation. 

Structures at points where transmission lines cross over railway were 
inspected, and side guys installed generally throughout the system. 

A rural line was built out of Walkerton Quarry substation, supplying con- 
sumers in the Walkerton rural power district. This work was done by the 
Operating Department maintenance staff, and line was put into service on Febru- 
ary 15, being operated by this department. 

The Flesherton rural power system was built by the Construction Depart- 
ment and turned over to the Operating Department for operation on March 
24, 1922. 

Owing to the programme of provincial highway construction, it was neces- 
sary to make extensive alterations to the lines on the Eugenia system. In some 
cases blasting under or near the Commission lines resulted in damage to the 
lines and equipment and serious interruptions to customers. Considerable 
trouble was experienced in this respect on the line running north to Owen 
Sound, and at one point on this line, where the roadway ran through a rock 
cutting, it was necessary for us to remove our lines from the highway for a 
distance of about 1,100 feet, in order to avoid a continuation of the numerous 
interruptions due to blasting. On the road north of Markdale, which was 
reconstructed more than a year ago, the settling of the earth has caused poles 
to go over and has rendered necessary constant inspection and considerable 
work to maintain it in a safe and satisfactory operating condition. A somewhat 
similar condition exists on the road between Durham and Mount Forest. 

The sleet storm of February 22, which was so severe further south, did 
practically no damage to the lines on the Eugenia system. The same is true 
of the sleet storm of March 31, 1922. 



30,000 



25,000 



20,000 



15,000 



10,000 











































1 






















































SEVERN. EUGENIA AND WASDELLS 
















































































































































dc a i/" i r\ a nc 


















































rLAK LUAUb 




















































1920- 1921 - 1922 

HYDRO-ELECTRIC POWER COMMISSION 
















































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































f 








































































f 
































































































































\ 








































/ 


' 






V 


























V- 


-> 




















































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































IAN 


FEB 


MAR 


APR 


MAY 


JUN 
19 


IUL 
20 


AUG 


SEP 


OCT 


NOV 


DEC 


JAN 


FEB. 


MAR 


APR 


MAY 


IUN 

19 


JUL. 
21 


AUG 


SEP 


OCT. 


NOV 


DEC. 


JAN 


FEB 


MAR 


APR 


MAY 


JUN 
19 


JUL. 
22 


AUG 


SEP 


OCT 


NOV 


DEC. 



20,000 



5,000 



1923 



HYDRO-ELECTRIC POWER COMMISSION 



33 



EUGENIA SYSTEM— LOADS OF MUNICIPALITIES, 1920 TO 1922 



Municipality 



Peak load in 
horsepower 



Oct., 1920 



Oct., 1921 



Oct., 1922 



Change 
1921- 



in load, 
1922 



Decrease 



Increase 



Arthur 

Carlsruhe and Neustadt 

Chatsworth 

Chesley 

Dundalk 

Durham 

Elmwood 

Flesherton 

Grand Valley 

Hanover 

Holstein 

Hornings Mills 

Kincardine 

Lucknow 

Markdale 

Mount Forest 

Orangeville 

Owen Sound 

Priceville 

Ripley 

Shelburne 

Tara 

Teeswater 

Wingham 



126.0 

104.5 

28.6 

247.0 

104.5 
130.0 

58.0 

55.4 

63.6 

727.8 
9.6 
5.0 



90.6 
192.7 

144.5 
1,340.0 



162.2 
53.6 



121.0 

170.2 

24.0 

263.2 

87.0 
512.0 

45.5 

47.5 

65.0 

1,441.0 
9.6 
5.0 

114.0 

85.7 

88.4 
156.4 

167.5 
1,402.0 

10.7 

49.5 

136.7 

53.6 
102.1 

382.0 



100.5 

167.5 

52.8 

268.8 

109.3 

573.7 

29.6 

36.2 

65.0 

1,675.7 
8.0 
5.0 

179.6 

87.0 

92.4 
205.8 

194.6 
1,691.7 

10.4 

77.7 

147.4 

42.8 
67.6 

297.5 



20.5 

2.7 



10 
34.5 

84.5 



28.8 
5.6 

22.3 
61.7 



234.7 

65.6 

1.3 

4.0 
49.4 

27.1 
289.7 

28.2 
10.7 



WASDELLS SYSTEM 



The load for the Wasdells system at the end of the fiscal year showed a 
considerable increase over the same month last year. This was, in great part, 
due to an extension of the system transmission line to supply the new munici- 
palities of Port Perry and Uxbridge. Due to the power requirements of the 
Severn and Eugenia systems, and in order to conserve water wherever possible, 
as well as because of the increased load of the Wasdells system, the generating 
station at Wasdells Falls has been kept heavily loaded. 

The shaft in No. 2 generator at Wasdells, which had broken and been 
repaired some years previously, was replaced by a new shaft, as the shaft again 
failed, making it practically impossible to effect satisfactory repair. At the 
time of the first break, a new shaft was ordered and had been delivered and 
held at the plant for some time in order to make the replacement when a suitable 
opportunity occurred. This work was carried out in March, 1922. 

2 H.C. 



34 



FIFTEENTH ANNUAL REPORT OF THE 



No. 49 



No. 1 unit at this plant is also operating with a repaired shaft, but a new- 
shaft of somewhat stronger design has been ordered and recently delivered, 
as it is intended to replace the shaft at an early date. A new thrust bearing has 
also been designed and supplied for this unit, and will be installed at the time 
the new shaft is put in. It is believed that this will avoid further trouble with 
shafts breaking. 

The metering equipment at the power house was re-arranged and additional 
meters installed in order to get more complete records of the power generated 
and distributed to the system or tie line. 

An investigation was made into the question of flooding certain lands 
above the power house, and it was shown that this was due, to a great extent, 
to narrow sections in the river, and not to the operation of the power house. 
An agreement was reached with the farmers on the lands affected, fixing the 
level to be maintained in the head water at the Wasdells plant. 

The usual details of maintenance were carried out through the year to 
maintain the equipment in the power house and substations in proper operating 
condition, and lines were constantly patrolled in order to detect and replace 
any insulators, cross-arms, etc., likely to cause trouble. 

A 22,000-volt single circuit line of 5/16 inch steel cable was constructed 
from Cannington to Greenbank station. A 3-phase transformer of 150-kv-a. 
capacity was installed at this station, stepping down from 22,000 volts to 4,000 
volts. A feeder at 4,000 volts runs from this station to Junction W761, a distance 
of \% miles, where it branches, one line running 4% miles to Port Perry and 
the other 4 miles to Uxbridge. Station and lines were made alive and service 
first given to the municipalities on September 29, 1922. 



WASDELLS SYSTEM— LOADS OF MUNICIPALITIES, 1920 TO 1922 



Municipality 


Peak load in 
horsepower 


Change in load, 
1921-1922 




Oct., 1920 


Oct., 1921 


Oct., 1922 


Decrease 


Increase 


Beaverton 


88.4 

81.0 

101.8 

15.6 

75.5 
89.5 


103.2 
58.4 
72.3 
17.4 
67.0 
80.4 


119.9 
53.6 
92.5 
32.7 
60.3 
61.0 


4.8 

6.7 
19.4 


16.7 


Brechin . . . 




Cannington 


20.2 


Kirkfield 


15.3 


Sunderland 




Woodville 





WASDELLS SYSTEM— NEW MUNICIPALITIES 



'Municipality 



Port Perry. 
Uxbridge. . 



Date 
connected 



Sept. 29, 1922 
Sept. 29, 1922 



Load in horsepower 



Initial 



80.4 
88.4 



Oct., 1922 



80.4 
88.4 



Increase 
in horse- 
power 



1923 



HYDRO-ELECTRIC POWER COMMISSION 



35 



MUSKOKA SYSTEM 

The generating station at South Falls has been taxed to its capacity during 
the past year. There has been some increase in the peak load demand of the 
Muskoka system municipalities, and they have also raised their load factor, 
so that the total kilowatt-hours required from the South Falls plant during 
1922 as compared with 1921 shows a growth in the average load of approximately 
14 per cent. 

The increase in the load has made it even more difficult than formerly to 
carry out maintenance work on the generators, turbines and other equipment. 
There are only short periods during which the load can be carried by one gener- 
ator, permitting the other to be closed down for inspection or repairs. 

On April 26, the shaft extension on No. 2 unit broke off. Work on a new 
shaft extension was rushed through and the unit was repaired and put back 
into service on April 28. During the interval, both Gravenhurst and Hunts- 
ville loads were restricted to the putput of No. 1 generator. To avoid a repetition 
of the same trouble, a new shaft extension was made up of nickel steel and 
installed. This work was carried out between Saturday night of June 30, and 
Tuesday morning, July 3, the load requirements of the municipalities being 
light over Sunday and Dominion Day. 

Some trouble has been experienced at different times during the year 
due to armature coils burning out in No. 1 generator. Repairs were in all cases 
rushed through without delay, a quantity of spare coils being kept on hand. 



2,500 



2,000 



1,500 



500 

































1 






■ 








1 






















































MUSKOKA SYSTEM 

PEAK LOADS 
1920-1921 - 1922 

HYDRO-ELECTRIC POWER COMMISSION 






























































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































\ 


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,/ 






































































V-i 














































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































JAN 


FEB. 


MAR 


APR 


MAY 


JUN 

19 


JUL 

20 


AUG 


SEP 


OCT 


NOV 


DEC. 


JAN. 


FEB. 


MAR 


APR 


MAY 


JUN 
19 


JUL. 
21 


AUG 


SEP 


OCT 


NOV 


DEC. 


JAN 


FEB 


MAR 


APR 


MAY 


JUN 
19 


JUL. 
22 


AUG 


SEP. 


OCT 


NOV 


DEC. 



3,000 



2,000 



1,500 



500 



36 



FIFTEENTH ANNUAL REPORT OF THE 



No. 49 



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1923 



HYDRO-ELECTRIC POWER COMMISSION 



37 



MUSKOKA SYSTEM— LOADS OF MUNICIPALITIES, 1920 TO 1922 



Municipality 


Peak load in 
horsepower 


Change in load, 
1921-1922 




Oct., 1920 


Oct., 1921 


Oct., 1922 


Decrease 


Increase 


Gravenhurst 


611.0 

655.5 


341.8 
872.6 


384.7 
921.0 




42.9 


Huntsville 


48.4 



10,000 



9,000 



8,000 



7,000 



5,000 



4,000 



2,000 





























r~ 








































































ST. LAWRENCE SYSTEiV 

PEAK LOADS 
1920- 1921 - 1922 

HYDRO-ELECTRIC POWER COMMISSION 


1 














































































































































































































OF ONTARIO 
























































































































































































































































































































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JAN. 


FEB. 


MAR 


APR 


MAY 


JUN. 

19 


JUL. 

10 


AUG. 


SEP. 


OCT. 


NOV. 


DEC. 


JAN. 


FEB. 


MAR 


APR 


MAY 


JUN. 
19 


JUL. 
21 


AUG 


SEP. 


OCT. 


NOV. 


DEC. 


JAN. 


FEB. 


MAR 


APR 


MAY 


JUN. 
19 


JUL. 
22 


AUG. 


SEP. 


OCT. 


NOV 


DEC. 



10,000 



8,000 



5,000 



3,000 



2,000 



ST. LAWRENCE SYSTEM 



Had the voltage of the St. Lawrence system not been raised to 44,000 
volts, the operation throughout the present fiscal year would have been practically 
uneventful. However, in order to supply power to the Eugene Phillips Com- 
pany, located at Brockville, the transmission voltage of the system had to be 
raised, and for economic reasons, 44,000 volts was selected. 

This, of course, necessitated changes in the old transmission lines and old 
stations, the changes at Prescott being the most drastic. This station was 
practically rebuilt, using a new 300-kv-a., out-door type transformer. Such 
changes were not necessary in the lines and stations of more recent construction, 
as provision had been made for this eventuality. 

The system has been operating since October 1, with two high-tension 
voltages, since a small section from Morrisburg to Winchester and Chesterville 
is still served at 25,400 volts, while 44,000 volts is used elsewhere. This small 
section was left undisturbed in order to avoid the expense of reinsulating the 
lines and making the necessary station changes. A 300-kv-a., 44,000/25,400- 
volt transformer, installed at Morrisburg, serves to supply the required power, 
while air-break switches located at the same point serve to sectionalize the high- 
tension lines. 

Owing to the fact that the high-tension transformers at Cornwall are 



38 



FIFTEENTH ANNUAL REPORT OF THE 



No. 49 



"Y"-connected on the 110,000-volt side, the neutral could not be grounded at 
Cornwall without creating inductive interference, injurious to the Bell Tele- 
phone Company. Various schemes for stabilizing the neutral without the 
objectionable telephone interference were tried, and numerous tests with 
oscillographic records were made. The transformers were left operating with 
the neutral of the service bank connected to the neutral of the high-tension 
bank, thus utilizing the service bank as a sort of tertiary winding. In this way 
the system has operated in a satisfactory manner. 

It might be added that the new station at Brockville which serves and is 
owned by the Eugene Phillips Company, was made alive on October 25, 1922, 
just prior to the close of the fiscal year. 



ST. LAWRENCE SYSTEM— LOADS OF MUNICIPALITIES, 1920 TO 1922 



Municipality 



Alexandria 

Apple Hill 

Brockville 

Chesterville 

Cornwall Pulp & Paper Co 

Howard §mith Paper Co. . . 

Lancaster 

Martintown 

Maxville 

Prescott 

Williamsburg 

Winchester . . 



Peak load in 
horsepower 



Oct., 1920 Oct., 1921 Oct., 1922 



1,048.0 
130.0 

725.0 



220.0 

17.6 
96.0 



136.2 
18.7 

1,038.8 

132.0 

1,880.7 

1,415.2 

22.7 

11.6 
34.8 

223.8 

13.4 
90.4 



183.0 
24.0 

1,233.2 

124.7 

2,443.0 

24.0 

12.4 
34.8 

147.4 

18.0 
110.0 



Change in load, 
1921-1922 



Decrease Increase 



76 



46.7 
5.3 

194.4 



1,017.7 
1.3 
0.8 



4.6 
19.6 



RIDEAU SYSTEM 



Of the Rideau system there is little to be said. From an operating point 
of view the Grenville Crushed Rock Company at Deeks, which was connected 
to the system on March 1, 1922, has given some trouble in the way of voltage 
regulation. This station was constructed by the customer to supply a load of 
considerable magnitude which, as is usual with rock crushing plants, was both 
variable and abrupt in its variations. As a result, the regulating equipment 
at High Falls failed to control satisfactorily the system voltage. The trouble 
was corrected by making minor additions and adjustments to the equipment, 
which is now satisfactory in every respect. 

The new station supplying the village of Kemptville was put in operation 
on November 28, 1921, and has since been operating without incident. This 
station is connected to the system by a 26,400 line from Merrickville, 12.1 miles 
in length, and since the load requirements are light it can be supplied from 
Merrickville station in case of trouble on the Smiths Falls-Merrickville line. 
This, of course, is an advantage. 



1923 



HYDRO-ELECTRIC POWER COMMISSION 



39 



5.000 




























n 














































9.000 






























RIDEAU SYSTEM 

PEAK LOADS 

1920-1921 -1922 

HYDRO-ELECTRIC POWER COMMISSION 












































































































































4,000 




















































































OF ONTARIO 








































































































3,000 




































































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JAN. 


FEB. 


MAR 


APR 


MAY 


JUN. 

19 


JUL. 
20 


AUG. 


SEP. 


OCT. 


NOV. 


DEC. 


JAN 


FEB. 


MAR 


APR 


MAY 


19 


JUL. 
21 


AUG 


SEP. 


OCT. 


NOV 


DEC. 


JAN. FEB. MAR. APR. MAY JUN. JUL. AUG. SEP. OCT. NOV. DEC. 
1922 



RIDEAU SYSTEM— LOADS OF MUNICIPALITIES, 1920 TO 1922 



Municipality 


Peak load in 
horsepower 


Change in load, 
1921-1922 




Oct., 1920 


Oct., 1921 


Oct., 1922 


Decrease 


Increase 


Carleton Place 


694.0 

558.0 
1,052.0 


769.4 

38.8 
522.7 
713.0 


800.2 

35.5 
474.5' 

785.5 


3.3 

48.2 


30 8 


Lanark 




Perth 




Smiths Falls 


72 5 







RIDEAU SYSTEM— NEW MUNICIPALITIES 



Municipality 


Date 
connected 


Load in horsepower 


Increase 
in horse 




Initial 


Oct., 1922 


power 


Kemptville 


Nov. 28, 1922 


117.9 


128.7 


10.8 





40 



FIFTEENTH ANNUAL REPORT OF THE 



No. 49 



U3MOd3SHOH 



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d3MOd3SUOH 



1923 HYDRO-ELECTRIC POWER COMMISSION 41 



PORT ARTHUR 

HIGH ST. STATION PORT ARTHUR 

I 1_ 2 2 , OOP. \/. I 1 J(0,000,V. 



22,300 
HORSEPOWER 



L_J 

N/PIGON P/BRE 
& PAPER MILLS LTD. 



LEGEND 



GENERATING STATIONS 

("HORSEPOWER" IS RATED ELECTRICAL TUIIMnrD DAV CVC-rmM 

HORSEPOWER AT RATED POWER PACTOR) IrlUNULK bAl OYolLIVl 

I I TRANSPORMER STATIONS (6 ° CYCLES ) 

=:" DIAGRAM OF STATIONS 

□ DISTRIBUTING STATIONS AS AT 0CT0BER 3, , 922 



STATIONS & LINES IN SERVICE 

STATIONS t LINES NOT COMISSION'S PROPERTY HYDRO-ELECTRIC POWER COMMISSION 

OF ONTARIO 



THUNDER BAY SYSTEM 

The Cameron Falls plant has now completed its second year of operation 
with steadily increasing load. There were no radical changes on the Thunder 
Bay system during the past year. 

Due to the closing down of the Nipigon Fibre Company just before the 
beginning of the fiscal year, the load decreased for some months, but a rapid 
increase has been evident since that time, and the load is now attaining a value 
where both generators are necessary to carry the load. 

All equipment at the generating station came through the year in good 
condition. Besides the usual repair work on auxiliary equipment, the turbine 
bearing on No. 2 unit was replaced. The units of the main power transformer 
bank have now been painted and placed in permanent locations. 

No trouble has been experienced with the transmission line so far. Weather 
conditions in the main have been favourable, although late last winter a severe 
sleet storm visited the Port Arthur district. While a great deal of damage was 
done by this storm to the local and other distribution systems, the Commission's 
line stood up under the strain and we experienced no trouble whatever. 

At the receiving station at Bare Point some work was done on the power 
transformers and the metering equipment. The power transformer tanks 
required attention due to oil leaks, and these have been repaired and the units 
painted. The metering equipment was altered slightly with a view to obtaining 
more satisfactory records. 

Some slight changes were made in the Port Arthur distributing station. 
These consisted in alterations to the metering equipment for better records, and 
in the protective equipment with a view to giving the best service by isolating 
trouble to its own feeder wherever possible. A section of the station near 
switchboard has been partitioned off as an office for the operators, for the 
greater safety of the operators and to reduce cost of heating. 

The increase in load on this system is shown by the curve given elsewhere 
in this report and indicates an encouraging growth in the amount of power 
utilized in this district. 



42 



FIFTEENTH ANNUAL REPORT OF THE 



No. 49 



U3MOd3SUOH 





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U3M0d3SU0H 



1923 HYDRO-ELECTRIC POWER COMMISSION 43 



OTTAWA SYSTEM 

The only change in operating conditions on the Ottawa system has been 
the addition of the Nepean Rural district, the line to which was first made alive 
on February 23, 1922. This line is connected to the distributing lines of the 
Ottawa Hydro-Electric Commission under arrangements with that Commission. 
The total supply of power for the Ottawa system is obtained from the Ottawa 
and Hull Power and Manufacturing Company under a contract between that 
Company and the Hydro-Electric Power Commission of Ontario. The delivery 
of power has been very reliable and satisfactory. 

The load of the Ottawa Hydro-Electric Commission, as will be seen from 
the accompanying graph, has continued to increase in a gratifying manner. 

CENTRAL ONTARIO AND TRENT SYSTEM* 

A noteworthy addition to the generating equipment of the Central Ontario 
and Trent system occurred during the month of August, 1922, when the first 
unit of the new Ranney Falls generating station was placed in operation. The 
plant consists of two 4,500-kv-a. units, one of which was put into service with 
certain load limitations pending the completion of the work. On September 2, 
the second generator became available and with the second transformer the entire 
plant became available on September 18, 1922. 

It is interesting to note that the plant is designed to operate with increased 
output while the canal is closed to navigation. The nominal electrical capacity 
during the navigation season, of 7,200 kilowatts, or 9,650 horsepower, becomes, 
with an eight-foot reduction of the reach above dam No. 9 and the corresponding 
increase in operating head at dam No. 10, approximately 8,400 kilowatts, or 
11,300 horsepower. 

A large percentage of the valuable power sites of the Trent and Otonabee 
rivers occurs in the neighbourhood of Campbellford. Dams 11, 12 and 14 are 
already developed, consequently Ranney Falls (dam No. 10) is close to a number 
of existing transmission lines. This is to some extent an operating convenience 
as it provides a number of outlets for the power, diminishing the possibility of 
the station being cut off from the high-tension transmission system. A double 
circuit section, 0.38 miles in length, loops the Healey Falls-Trenton line 
into the station, which enables the operators to sectionalize this line, and 
in case of trouble on one section, to deliver power over the other. Ultimately 
another connection will be made from Ranney Falls to the Campbellford- 
Belleville line. 

These numerous connections have the advantage of great operating flex- 
ibility in the matter of transmission, but the concentration of so large a per- 
centage of the system power between Healey Falls and Trenton necessitates 
heavier transmission lines in all directions than would be the case if the plants 
were spread out nearer the various load centres. 



* The Central Ontario system and the Trent system both receive their electrical energy 
from the same sources of power supply through the same main transmission network and from 
the standpoint of power development and electrical operation are regarded as a unit and known 
as the Central Ontario and Trent system. It may be explained that after the Central Ontario 
system was purchased by the provincial Government, a number of municipalities in central 
Ontario, from time to time, applied to the Hydro-Electric Power Commission for power to be 
supplied under the provisions of the Power Commission Act. The municipalities in central On- 
tario which thus enter into direct relationship with the Hydro-Electric Power Commission are 
for purposes of financial administration grouped in what is termed the "Trent system." 



44 



FIFTEENTH ANNUAL REPORT OF THE 



No. 49 



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1923 HYDRO-ELECTRIC POWER COMMISSION 45 

As a result of the re-insulation work carried out during 1919 and 1920, 
a very high grade of service has been obtained from the transmission lines at 
comparatively small expense. Insulator failures are almost unknown and 
interruptions from other causes have been satisfactorily dealt with. It is now 
safe to say that the reduction in the number of patrolmen as described in the 
Annual Report for 1921 was fully justified from the viewpoint of service as well 
as economy. 

It is gratifying to report that high-tension line surges have been reduced 
through grounding the system neutral at the star point of the three-phase 
transformers at Healey Falls. Equipment has also been provided, making it 
possible to ground the neutral at the Sidney Terminal station in case the system 
should be sectionalized so that Healey Falls and Trenton are supplying different 
sections. It is standard operating practice to keep all high-tension lines in 
parallel and the neutral grounded at only one point, usually Healey Falls. 

To improve the relay operation and to provide a relay system workable 
with a grounded neutral transmission system, a thorough revision of the relays 
throughout the entire 44,000-volt system was made. Although the operation 
of these relays depends to a large extent upon suitable settings, which requires 
a certain amount of time and experience, it can be definitely said that the reverse 
power and ground relays, which previously were not in general use, make it 
possible automatically to isolate sections of lines on which trouble occurs, with 
very little, if any, disturbance to the rest of the system. 

As a result of the combination of the new relay scheme and the grounded 
neutral, disturbances which previously would have created surges, spreading 
over large and unexpected sections of the system, are now localized. 

On the initiative of the Peterboro Civic Utilities, an improvement has been 
effected in the line facilities for utilizing, when required, the surplus power 
of the Peterboro Hydraulic Power Company. Formerly this power was fed 
directly into one or two circuits of the Peterboro distributing system, which 
imposed undesirable limitations as to the quantity of power which could be. 
taken at various times. Now the Quaker Oats Company has set aside one of 
its lines from the Peterboro Hydraulic Power Company to its factory, and the 
Civic Utilities has provided a line from the factory to the Peterboro substation, 
which enables the Commission to deliver the power to the 2,400-volt bus and 
meter it at the station. The Commission provided protective equipment at 
the Peterboro Hydraulic Power Company. 

At the request of the Canada Cement Company, one of the 750-kv-a., 
44,000-volt transformers was removed from the Belleville Cement Mill to the 
Lehigh station, where it is more likely to be required. The connections for the 
transformer have not yet been completed. 



46 



FIFTEENTH ANNUAL REPORT OF THE 



No. 49 



UHMOdBSdOH 




UBMOdBSUOH 



1923 



HYDRO-ELECTRIC POWER COMMISSION 



47 



CENTRAL ONTARIO AND TRENT SYSTEM— LOADS OF MUNICIPALITIES, 

1920 TO 1922 



Municipality 


Peak load in 
horsepower 


Change 
1921- 


in load, 
-1922 




Oct., 1920 


Oct., 1921 


Oct., 1922 


Decrease 


Increase 


Belleville 


1,689.0 
54.0 

1,206.0 
122.0 
134.0 

804.0 
109.0 

302.0 

1,707.0 

161.0 
1,158.0 

131.0 

34.0 

374.0 

273.0 

37.0 

40.0 

37.0 

3,307.0 

3,950.0 
295.0 
405.0 

134.0 

593.0 
92.0 

87.0 
424.0 


1,943.7 
22.7 

1,119.3 
97.3 
98.5 

970.0 
109.3 

250.6 

71.4 

2,506.7 

156.8 
1,375.3 

143.4 
49.5 
40.7 

565.6 

386.0 

48.2 

37.5 

90.3 

48.2 

3,493.2 

4,886.0 
268.0 
575.0 

. 107.2 

671.5 
106.5 

63.0 
509.3 


2,624.8 
35.0 

1,285.0 

174.2 

82.4 

1,059.0 
126.5 

287.0 

69.8 

2,547.0 

85.0 
1,260.0 

152.0 
49.4 
36.4 

576.4 

160.8 

59.0 

101.3 

58.0 

40.0 

3,850.0 

4,306.2 
326.0 
608.0 

135.3 

823.0 
144.7 

74.0 
583.0 


io\i 

71.8 
115.3 

'6'i 

4.3 
225^2 

32.3 
8.2 

579.8 


681.1 


Bloomfield 


12.3 


Bowman ville 


165.7 


Brighton 


76.9 


Brooklin Rural 




Cobourg 


88.5 


Colborne 


17.2 


Deseronto 


36.4 


Havelock 


1.6 


Kingston 


. 40.3 


Lakefield 




Lindsay 




Madoc 


8.6 






Millbrook 




Napanee 


10.8 


Newburg 




Newcastle 


10.8 




63.8 


Omemee 




Orono 




Oshawa 


356 8 






Picton 


58 




33 


Stirling 


28.1 




151.5 


Tweed 


38 2 


Wellington 


11.0 


Whitby 


73.7 







48 



FIFTEENTH ANNUAL REPORT OF THE 



No. 49 



PROBLEM OF WATER SHORTAGE 

The Central Ontario and Trent system, as is well known, is entirely depen- 
dent for power upon generating stations situated on the Trent and Otonabee 
rivers, — waters which are navigable. These generating stations are now the 
property of the province of Ontario and are operated in trust by the Hydro- 
Electric Power Commission of Ontario. The interest of navigation and all 
matters respecting the regulation of stream flow are under the jurisdiction of 
the Federal Government. The interests of both navigation and power are 
affected by the manner in which the Trent and Otonabee waters are regulated. 
Navigation is chiefly concerned with the maintenance of certain levels, while 
power is more especially interested in the maintenance of a uniform stream 
flow. 

At times, insufficient stream flow has created serious power shortages 
which, it is contended, could have been avoided without in any manner causing 
injury to navigation interests. In 1922, a very serious shortage occurred. The 
Hydro-Electric Power Commission of Ontario has had technical officers make 
a careful study of the conditions which resulted in this shortage with a view 
to ascertaining what form of flow regulation could advantageously be adopted 
in order to avoid, so far as possible, similar shortages in the future. The various 
data and studies of the Commission's engineers are being assembled in the form 
of a Report, which, if ready before the Fifteenth Annual Report goes to press, 
will be included as Appendix No. 3. 





2.200. V. 


NIPISSING 


22,000. V. 




2.010 
HORSEPOWER 






t 



POWASSAN 



~~j NORTH BAY 

1 

J CALLANDER 



D 



LEGEND 

GENERATING STATIONS 
("HORSEPOWER" IS rated ELECTRICAL 
HORSEPOWER AT RATE~D POWER FACTOR) 

DISTRIBUTING STATIONS 

STATIONS X. LINES IN SERVICE" 



NIPISSING SYSTEM 

(60 CYCLES) 

DIAGRAM OF STATIONS 

AS AT OCTOBER 31. 1922 



HYDRO-ELECTRIC POWER COMMISSION 
OF ONTARIO 



NIPISSING SYSTEM 



The Nipissing power house has been operated very close to its maximum 
capacity as regards both generating equipment and water supply. Constant 
attention has been necessary to maintain equipment in continuous and efficient 
operating condition and to conserve water as far as possible. 

The storage of water in various areas, made possible by the dams put in 



923 



HYDRO-ELECTRIC POWER COMMISSION 



49 



3,000 
































... 


— 


— 




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/ 




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1-1 




































1,000 
















































































































































































































































































































































































500 



























































































































































































































































































































































































































































JAN. 


FEB. 


MAR 


APR 


MAY 


M. 

19 


JUL. 

20 


AUG. 


SEP. 


OCT. 


NOV. 


DEC. 


JAN. 


FEB. 


MAR 


APR 


MAY 


JUN. 

19 


JUL. 

21 


AUG 


SEP. 


OCT. 


NOV 


DEC. 


JAN. FEB. MAR. APR. MAY JUN. JUL. AUG. SEP. OCT. NOV. DEC. 

1922 



3,000 



,000 



during 1920, has been essential to the operation of the system. Rangers have 
been employed throughout the year to look after these dams, doing such minor 
maintenance as necessary, and operating the stop logs to store or release water 
as required. Two rangers' shanties have been constructed in the bush for 
their accommodation while at outlying points. 

Braie Lake storage dam was blown up with dynamite by some unknown 
party on August 6 or 7, 1922. The person responsible for this damage has not 
yet been discovered, and there is no apparent motive for the outrage. The loss 
of the water stored on this lake made it necessary to drain the storage areas 
further back, and in view of the abnormally dry summer and autumn, this 
depletion of storage areas is a matter of serious importance. The dry season has 
also reduced the natural autumn storage and stream flow, lowering the possible 
output of the power house. 

The power house and equipment generally have been maintained in good 
operating condition. The Lombard governor cylinders were re-bored and re- 
ground, and fitted with larger pistons to give more efficient governor operation. 
Protective screens were installed around the lightning arresters to avoid danger 
of operators coming in contact with live parts. On the main dam above the 
power house a hand railing was installed for the safety of the operators. 

On April 7, lightning struck the North Bay auxiliary steam plant, setting 
fire to the building. The fire was extinguished without serious damage to the 
building, but the 150-kw. generator was badly burned and had to be returned 
to the manufacturers for repair. The 300-kw. generator was damaged by water, 
but repairs were made and coils dried out without removing machine from the 
plant. The manufacturers put in a new winding in the 150-kw. generator, and 
same was returned to North Bay and reinstalled in the steam plant in October. 
Loss was covered by insurance. 

At Callander substation an additional 25-kv-a., 22,000-volt, single-phase 
transformer was installed, connected in open delta to operate with the trans- 
former previously installed. All equipment in the station was grounded. 



50 FIFTEENTH ANNUAL REPORT OF THE No. 49 



OPERATING DEPARTMENT METER SECTION 

The work of this section of the operating department has been carried on 
in the usual way during the past year in checking, calibrating and maintaining 
in adjustment all the metering equipment used by the Commission for billing 
purposes. This equipment is calibrated periodically, and in case of damage 
is repaired and replaced in service as soon as possible. 

The protective devices on feeders, transformer banks and high-tension 
lines have been maintained in the best possible condition, and in most cases 
trouble is now isolated in its own location instead of involving other sections. 

The services of the Operating Department meter repair shop have been 
used for repairing and rewinding instrument transformers and rebuilding meters. 
This work is taken care of in emergency at minimum expense. Some special 
work in adjustment of voltage transformers for accurate ratio has* also been 
done. 

A number of tests of various sorts have been made for municipalities 
requesting them, the engineers of this department, with the necessary equipment, 
being available at short notice. 

Checks are also made in the case of new stations and new equipment being 
cut into service, this being necessary in order to ensure minimum disturbance 
to equipment already in service, and also to obviate the necessity of later inter- 
ruptions, as any alterations thus discovered to be necessary can be made before 
equipment is made alive and permanently connected into service. 



923 HYDRO-ELECTRIC POWER COMMISSION 51 



SECTION IV 

ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING AND CONSTRUCTION 
NIAGARA SYSTEM 

QUEENSTON GENERATING STATION 

Power House Superstructure 

The construction of the superstructure of Queenston generating station has 
been continued and the general construction of the 300 feet of the building has 
been practically completed including all interior walls and compartments neces- 
sary for the installation of electrical apparatus for four units. 

The building tile for the partitions was supplied by the National Fire Proof- 
ing Company of Canada, Limited, Toronto, and the tile for the exterior walls by 
the Interlocking Tile Company, Limited, Toronto. 

The toilet fittings were supplied by the Empire Brass Manufacturing Com- 
pany, Toronto. 

The interior doors and trim are kalamein covered and were supplied by the 
A. B. Ormsby Company, Limited, Toronto. 

The metal lath throughout the station is of Hyrib lath supplied by the 
Trussed Concrete Steel Company of Canada, Walkerville. 

The roofing of the building is being done by the Carmichael Waterproofing 
Company Limited, Toronto, and the roofing tile for the roof surface is being 
supplied by the Department of the Provincial Secretary. 

A twelve-ton hoist supplied by the Northern Crane Works Company has 
been installed in the south end of the station. 

The fans for generator cooling purposes have been installed on four units. 

The passenger elevator in the south end of the station has been installed 
by the Turnbull Elevator Company, Toronto. 

Screen House 

The construction of the Queenston screen house has been continued and 
the general construction of 400 feet of the building is proceeding, including the 
Administration building at the south end. The tile for the interior partitions 
is being supplied by the National Fire Proofing Company of Canada, Limited, 
Toronto. 

Generators 

As projected in last year's Report, No. 1, 45,000-kv-a. main unit was "turned 
over" for the first time on December 26, 1921. On December 28, the opening 
of the power house was officially celebrated. After drying run, the generator 
was phased out and paralleled with the Niagara system on January 22, 1922. 
Necessary adjustments were made and the machine was put into commercial 
service on January 26, 1922. 

No. 2 unit was "turned over" for the first time on February 20, 1922, the 
generator phased out after drying on March 15, and put on commercial load on 
March 16, 1922. 



52 



FIFTEENTH ANNUAL REPORT OF THE No. 49 




QUEENSTON-CHIPPAWA DEVELOPMENT 
Queenston power house: General view from United States side of Niagara river, 

December 20, 1921 



1923 



HYDRO-ELECTRIC POWER COMMISSION 



53 




QUEENSTON-CHIPPAWA DEVELOPMENT 

Queenston power house: General view from United States side of Niagara river opposite No. 5 unit, 

November 1, 1922. Compare with preceding illustration to note progress made during year 



On April 16, this unit broke down due to a ventilating fan coming off the 
rotor and damaging the armature windings. The winding was repaired by the 
manufacturers under their contract guarantee and placed in service again. The 
repaired generator was "turned over" again on May 28, and placed in commercial 
operation once more on May 31, 1922. 

No. 3 unit was "turned over" for the first time on July 25, and the drying out 
of the generator was completed on August 11. Tests for efficiency characteristics, 
sudden short circuit and overspeed were made during the following week to 
ascertain whether contract guarantees were met. These were all successful ex- 
cept the short circuit test under which the bracing on the armature winding 
failed. The armature was rewound with heavier bracing by the manufacturers 
under the terms of their contract guarantee and the unit started up again on 
September 23. After drying out it was put on commercial load on October 3, 
1922. 

No. 4 unit is nearly assembled and will be ready to go on load about Decem- 
ber 1. It is expected that No. 5 unit will be ready for service in March, 1923. 

Transformers 

Three banks each consisting of three 15,000-kv-a., single phase transformers 
have been installed to take care of the output of Nos. 1, 2 and 3 generators, each 
bank being ready in time to go into service with its respective generating unit. 
The remaining six transformers of the original order of fifteen have been partly 
installed. 

One bank is illustrated in the accompanying cut. 

Switching Equipment 

The necessary switching equipment., including oil circuit-breakers, bus-bars 
and connections and their insulators, instrument transformers, reactors and 



54 



FIFTEENTH ANNUAL REPORT OF THE 



No. 49 




QUEENSTON-CHIPPAWA DEVELOPMENT 
Screen house from south-east. October 8. 1921 




QUEENSTON-CHIPPAWA DEVELOPMENT 

Administration building and screen house from south-east, November 3, 1922. Compare with preceding 

illustration to note progress made during year 



924 



HYDRO-ELECTRIC POWER COMMISSION 



55 




56 



FIFTEENTH ANNUAL REPORT OF THE 



No. 49 



protective equipment for each unit, was installed and ready to go into service with 
the unit which it controlled in each case. 

Switchboards 

Temporary switchboards have been installed for control of units 1 to 4 and 
"service" pending the construction of that part of the building in unit bays 4 
and 5 which is to house the permanent control equipment. Designs of the per- 




QUEENSTON-CHIPPAWA DEVELOPMENT 
Queenston power house: 110,000-volt bus connections and disconnecting-switches for No. 3 unit. 

August 4, 1922 



1923 HYDRO-ELECTRIC POWER COMMISSION 57 

manent control room have been worked out and the building is now practically 
complete. It is expected that the permanent switchboard will be ready by the 
time No. 5 unit is ready for service. 

Slate for the permanent switchboard was ordered from A. H. Winter Joyner, 
Limited, in July. Other switchboard equipment will be moved from the tem- 
porary control room where it is now installed. 

Grounding Neutral 

Neutrals of generators have been operated dead grounded hitherto. The 
Canadian Westinghouse Company are supplying a temporary resistance for the 
neutrals of units 1 and 2 until opportunity occurs to add bracing to the armature 
windings on these machines. 

The 110,000-volt neutral has been operated ungrounded at this station, the 
ground through resistance at Niagara transformer station being depended upon. 
However, as the bulk of the Niagara System load is being transferred to Queen- 
ston, a neutral grounding resistance of 100 ohms is being installed and should be 
ready for service in December, 1922. 

Station Service 

Station service distributing and control switchboards at service station "A" 
with all feeders to necessary services and all batteries and control circuits were 
completed in December, 1921, and Whirlpool distributing station was available 
as a source of power to enable No. 1 unit to be started. 

Service generating unit "A" (2,200-kv-a.) was started up for drying run on 
January 11, and put on load on January 26, 1922. Service unit "B" was put 
on load on March 18. 

Auxiliary Systems and Equipment 

Lubrication systems, transformer oil systems and cooling water piping 
systems were completed for each unit by the time the unit itself was ready for 
operation. 

The 150-kw., auxiliary exciter set was delivered by the Swedish General 
Electric Company in February, 1922, and was set up in a temporary location. 



QUEENSTON-CHIPPAWA DEVELOPMENT 
Queenston power house: Outgoing lines connected through rear pent houses on roof. 

August 4, 1922 



58 FIFTEENTH ANNUAL REPORT OF THE No. 49 

Outgoing Lines 

Outgoing 110, 000- volt lines were strung for three units. These run through 
standard 11 0,000- volt entrance bushings in the pent houses on the station roof 
where they connect to section N20x50 of the Niagara transmission system at 
the bottom of the span strung from a roof structure to towers at the top of the 
escarpment. 

ONTARIO POWER COMPANY 

The bursting of No. 15 generator in the power house on April 20, 1922, 
damaged the adjacent No. 16 generator and caused the collapse of the roof over 
units Nos. 15 and 16 and twisting of the roof steel between units No. 14 and 
No. 15. 

The damage to the building was repaired during the year. The generators, 
however, had not been replaced by October 31, 1922. 

The repairs and replacements to the building structural steel were carried 
out by the Standard Steel Construction Company. The roofing was done by 
the Carmichael Waterproofing Company and the remainder of the work was 
undertaken by the Construction department. 

The accompanying cuts illustrate forcibly the damage done by this accident. 
The original installation was described and illustrated in the 1918 and 1919 
Annual Reports. 

Chippawa Distributing Station 

In order to supply power to the village of Chippawa and the Chippawa 
rural district including the village of Stevensville, the Commission authorized, 
on August 2, 1922, the purchase and installation of the equipment necessary for 
a pole- type station to be fed from one of the 12, 000- volt lines from the Ontario 
Power Company's distributing station. The equipment will consist of a 300-kv-a., 
3-phase, special rural-class transformer with 12, 000- volt choke-coils, disconnect- 
ing-switches and fuses, and two 4,000-volt feeders with fuses and a graphic- 
recording wattmeter for the Chippawa feeder. 

The transformer has been purchased from the Packard Electric Company 
and layout drawings are being made up. The installation will be done by the 
Construction department and it is expected that the work will be completed in 
December, 1922. 

Beamsville Distributing Station 

In order to supply power to the Beamsville rural district, the Commission, 
on June 19, 1922, authorized the purchase and installation of the equipment 
necessary for a pole- type station to be fed from a new 12, 000- volt line from St. 
Catharines. The equipment will consist of a 300-kv-a., 3-phase, special rural- 
class transformer manufactured by the Packard Electric Company with 12,000- 
volt choke-coils, disconnecting-switches and fuses, and one 4,000-volt feeder with 
fuses and a graphic-recording wattmeter. The work is being carried out by the 
Construction department and will be completed in November, 1922. 

Grimsby Distributing Station 

In order to supply power to the Growers' Cold Storage and Ice Company, 
Limited, at Grimsby, the Commission, on June 19, 1922, authorized the purchase 
and installation of the equipment necessary for a pole-type station to be fed 
from a new 12, 000- volt line to be extended from Beamsville. The station con- 
sists of a 300-kv-a., 3-phase, special rural-class transformer supplied by the 
Packard Electric Company with 12,000-volt choke-coils, disconnecting-switches 
and fuses, and one 4,000-volt. feeder with fuses. The graphic-recording metering 



1923 



HYDRO-ELECTRIC POWER COMMISSION 



59 




ONTARIO POWER COMPANY 
Accident in power house, April 20, 1922: View showing one segment of rotor which was thrown through 
roof of power house when No. 15 generator burst, lying where it fell beside No. 11 unit. 




ONTARIO POWER COMPANY 

Accident in power house, April 20, 1922: Birdseye view from top of cliff 

showing damage done by bursting of No. 15 generator 



60 FIFTEENTH ANNUAL REPORT OF THE No. 49 

equipment is located in the Growers' Cold Storage and Ice Company's station 
but is the property of the Commission. The work was completed by the Con- 
struction department on October 31, and is ready to deliver service as soon as 
the customer's equipment is in condition to receive it. 

Montrose Distributing Station 

This station was taken out of service in January, 1922, and partially dis- 
mantled. In August, 1922, it was again placed in service to supply power to 
Chippawa and Stevensville villages and to the contractors for dredging out the 
Wei land River section of the Chippawa canal. 

Whirlpool Distributing Station 

This station was taken out of service in August, 1922, and is being dis- 
mantled. 

NIAGARA TRANSFORMER STATION 

The connection of No. 5 Ontario Power Company feeder to the main 12,000- 
volt bus between No. 2 and No. 3 feeder structures of the Ontario Power Com- 
pany at the north end of the station, as outlined in last year's Report, was 
completed and the feeder placed in service on November 20, 1921. 

The installation of type-"CR," reverse-power and type-"CO," ground re- 
lays with current-transformers, as outlined in last year's Report, was completed 
on the Ontario Power Company feeders in July, 1922, but held up on the Cana- 
dian Niagara Power Company feeders on account of inability to get interruptions. 
Work, however, is now proceeding on these feeders and will be completed in 
November, 1922. 

The installation of 110,000-volt outdoor breakers in Al and A4 lines, as 
outlined in last year's Report, has been completed, 1A4 being finished on Febru- 
ary 1, 1922, and 1A1 on March 16, 1922. In July, 1922, it was decided to add 
grounding clamps and an operating platform on the Dundas side. These were 
completed in October, 1922. 

On November 1, 1921, work was started on the installation of a ventilating 
system in the basement for quickly removing the smoke in event of trouble on 
the 12,000-volt switching equipment. The equipment consists of 110- volt direct 
current fans located in the windows and operated from storage batteries arranged 
in three circuits, one for the north section and two for the south section, and 
controlled by knife switches located on the main floor. The fans were purchased 
from and installed by the Canadian Blower and Forge Company, while the 
conduit and connections were installed by the Construction department, the 
work being completed and placed in service on September 18, 1922. 

In January, 1922, it was decided to install new 12,000-volt disconnecting 
switch blades equipped with resistors on the potential transformer switches on 
all the Ontario Power Company feeders not equipped with same, and on the two 
sets of the main Ontario Power Company bus potential transformers. These 
were ordered from the Canadian Westinghouse Company and installed by the 
Construction department, the work b.eing completed and in service on September 
17, 1922. 

In February, 1922, authorization was given for the installation of one 
110,000-volt, 300-ampere, non-automatic, electrically-operated oil breaker to 
replace the existing bus-tie breaker which was of insufficient capacity; also for 
the changing of contacts from 200- to 400-ampere capacity and installing of 
new tank linings in the two 110,000-volt, outdoor resistance breakers in the 
Niagara-Dundas lines (Nlx2) and also for changing the current-carrying parts 
from 200- to 400-ampere capacity and installing stronger insulators on the two 
sets of bus disconnecting-switches. Current-carrying parts for bus disconnect- 



1923 HYDRO-ELECTRIC POWER COMMISSION 61 

ing-switches were purchased from the Canadian Westinghouse Company and 
were installed with insulators from stock by the Operating department in Febru- 
ary, 1922. The bus-tie, oil breaker — one that had been rebuilt — was installed 
and placed in service on September 17, 1922. New current-carrying parts for 
outdoor resistance breakers were delivered by the Canadian Westinghouse 
Company in September, while tank linings had been purchased by the Operating 
department in October, 1921. Installation of these will be completed early in 
1923. 

A start was made on May 31, 1922, with the purchase and installation of 
three Canadian General Electric Company, current-limiting reactors (type 
C.L.S., 25-cycle, 2,300-kv-a., 1,150-volts, 2,000-amperes) with three shunt re- 
sistors to replace the three ''Metropolitan" reactors in set, "A" location. When 
these last were damaged in August, 1921, two similar reactors were removed from 
set "C" location and installed in set "A" and the bus at set "C" connected with 
jumpers. In October it was decided to install the new reactors in set "C" 
location. The reactors were delivered during the latter part of October and 
installation will be completed early in 1923 by the Operating department. 

Niagara Falls Municipal Station 

Plans and specifications for the new combined substation and office building, 
as outlined in the last report, were prepared by Mr. C. M. Borter, of Niagara 
Falls, as the architect for the Niagara Falls Commission. The contract for the 
building was placed by that body with the Robertson Construction and Engineer- 
ing Company of Niagara Falls, Ontario. Construction work was started in May 
and it is expected that the building will be completed in December, 1922. 

Engineering assistance was given by the Commission in the preparation of 
plans for the oil and cooling-water systems in connection with the station. The 
cooling- water system included a cooling pond, for which plans were prepared, 
the work being carried out by the municipal Commission. Instructions were 
issued to the Construction department to purchase and install all oil and water 
piping. Assistance was also given to the local Commission in the purchase of 
a water pump, a transformer-oil storage tank, a chain block for dismantling 
transformers, and a transformer truck. 

Detailed plans of the substation equipment have been completed. The con- 
tract covering the switchboard, the 2,300-volt, switching equipment, the 12,000- 
volt, lightning arresters and one 80-kv-a., 3-phase, induction regulator was placed 
with the Canadian General Electric Company. 

The local Commission was given engineering assistance in connection with 
the purchase and testing of a new 1,500-kv-a., 13, 200/2, 300-volt, 3-phase, oil- 
insulated, water-cooled transformer bought from the Canadian Crocker- Wheeler 
Company for use in the new station. 

The station load will be totalized on the 12,000-volt incoming lines and 
metered by graphic-recording wattmeter and recording, reactive, volt-ampere 
meter, and watthour meter, these being the property of the Commission. 

In July the Construction department placed the conduit in the main floor 
of the substation and in September commenced the work of installing the station 
equipment. It is expected that sufficient equipment will be installed to give a 
partial service in December and that the installation will be completed early 
in 1923. 

Stamford Township Municipal Station 

The change outlined in last year's Report was carried out by the Construc- 
tion department and completed and placed in service on January 28, 1922. 



62 FIFTEENTH ANNUAL REPORT OF THE No. 49 

DUNDAS TRANSFORMER STATION 

In January, 1921, it was decided to change the current transformers on the 
Hamilton feeders (Nos. 251, 252, 257 and 258) to provide increased capacity. 
This was done and the new current transformers placed in service on February 
18, 1922, by the Operating department. 

In August, 1922, authorization was given to replace the disconnecting- 
switches and choke-coils on feeders 257 and 258 by new ones of larger capacity. 
This will be completed early in 1923 by the Operating department. 

In the month of August the preparation of plans for a 45-foot extension 
to the east end of the present building was commenced. 

The structural steel was contracted for with the Hamilton Bridge Works 
in September. 

Instructions were issued to the Construction department in September 
covering the complete building, and on October 31 approximately 25 per cent, of 
the work was done, while practically all the required material was on the site on 
that date. 

This extension is to house two new 110, 000- volt oil breakers, with necessary 
connecting material and metering equipment for two 110,000- volt lines. The 
installation will be.completed early in 1923. 

Dundas Rural Distributing Station 

In order to supply power to the Dundas rural district, the Commission 
authorized the purchase and installation of the equipment necessary for a pole- 
type station to be fed from a 13,200-volt line from Dundas transformer station. 
The station will consist of a 300-kv-a., 3-phase, outdoor- type transformer with 
13,200-volt choke-coils, disconnecting-switches and fuses, and one 2,300-volt 
feeder with fuses and graphic-recording wattmeter equipment. 

Drawings are now being prepared. The installation will be done by the 
Construction department and is expected to be completed early in 1923. 

Hagersville Distributing Station 

The three 75-kv-a., single-phase, indoor transformers, recently removed from 
Hagersville distributing station and stored in the station yard, were shipped to 
the Canadian Westinghouse Company in September to be converted to outdoor- 
type transformers, and when changes are completed to be shipped to the Hamil- 
ton transformer station. 

Lynden Distributing Station 

In order to serve a rural load out of this station authorization was given in 
February, 1922, to purchase and install the necessary equipment for a rural 
feeder, including a demand meter for measuring the load. The work was done 
by the Construction department and the new feeder placed in service on July 31, 
1922. 

TORONTO TRANSFORMER STATION 

The differential relay protection for the five banks of power transformers 
mentioned in last year's Report was completed and placed in service on January 
14, 1922. 

Three of the 5,000-kv-a. transformers purchased from the Canadian General 
Electric Company for use on the Niagara system were shipped to Toronto trans- 
former station, where they have been stored in the yard for emergency use. The 
transformers were delivered to Toronto transformer station in July. 

As the two 110,000-volt line, oil circuit-breakers which were installed in Tor- 
onto in 1910 did not have sufficient interrupting capacity for the present system it 
was decided in September to replace both breakers. Accordingly an order was 



1923 HYDRO-ELECTRIC POWER COMMISSION 63 

placed with the Canadian Westinghouse Company for two type- u G.A.4," indoor, 
oil circuit-breakers including bushing- type current-transformers. 

While the new breakers are being installed reverse-power relays will be 
provided for the 110,000- volt lines. 

The work will be carried out early in 1923. 

As a temporary measure to increase the transformer capacity it was decided 
in October to move the three 5,000-kv-a. transformers, which were in storage in 
the yard, to a convenient location north of the station, and to connect up to the 
110, 000- volt bus and to the 13,200-volt buses in the station. This will be accom- 
plished by extending the 110,000-volt bus through the north wall to a type- 
"G.A.4," Westinghouse, outdoor breaker. The 13,200-volt connections will be 
made with armoured cable through two oil circuit-breakers belonging to the 
Toronto Hydro-Electric system. Differential relay protection will be provided 
using high-voltage current-transformers manufactured by the Production and 
Service department and low-voltage current-transformers purchased from the 
Ferranti Meter and Transformer Manufacturing Company, Toronto. A wood- 
pole structure will be erected over the transformers to carry the high- and low- 
voltage connections. 

This installation of the transformers will be completed early in 1923. 

All the work referred to at the Toronto transformer station has been or will 
be done by the Construction department. 

LONDON TRANSFORMER STATION 

In February a 46-ton transformer truck was purchased to accommodate 
the 5,000-kv-a. transformers being installed. A set of lifting beams for the 
transformers was purchased in January. 

During the year several minor alterations were made to the building, in- 
cluding the addition of a small room for storing synchronous condenser, spare 
armature coils and the installation of a shower bath with water heater. 

The four 5,000-kv-a. transformers referred to in last year's Report were 
completely assembled and on April 9, three of these were placed in service in 
No. 2 compartment. The three 2,500-kv-a. transformers were then removed 
from No. 3 compartment and shipped to Guelph transformer station on May 1. 
The two 1,250-kv-a. transformers were stored in the yard at the London trans- 
former station for a short time, and were shipped to Preston transformer station 
in October. 

The changes in the switching equipment referred to in last year's Report and 
the changes in the building will be completed in January. This work is being 
done by the Construction department, which also did all the work of moving 
the transformers. 

To release the three 2,500-kv-a. transformers now in No. 1 compartment for 
one of the other transformer stations on the Niagara system it has been decided 
to install in the London station three more of the 5,000-kv-a. transformers 
purchased from the Canadian General Electric Company for use on the Niagara 
system. 

These transformers will be ready for service early in 1923. 

To provide storage space for construction material and for line and station 
maintenance supplies a storehouse of corrugated iron on wood frame approxi- 
mately thirty feet by sixty feet, has been erected to the north-west of the London 
transformer station. This building was erected by the Construction department. 

To provide a means of bringing the 10,000-kv-a. synchronous condenser to 
rest quickly in case of fire in the machine a mechanical brake has been ordered 
from the Dominion Bridge Company, Montreal. At the same time doors, to be 



64 FIFTEENTH ANNUAL REPORT OF THE No. 49 

tripped by the differential relays, are being placed in the air ducts and the con- 
denser itself will be totally enclosed. This work will be carried out by the 
Construction department. 

Delaware Distributing Station 

In August, 1922, authorization was given to change the three-phase, 4,000- 
volt Delaware feeder in this station, which serves the Delaware load, into three 
single-phase feeders, one to serve Delaware and two to serve Melbourne and 
Komoka. The recording wattmeter will be removed from the Delaware panel 
and replaced by two maximum-demand meters, one of which will be connected 
to measure the Delaware load and the other the Melbourne and Komoka loads. 
This installation will be completed early in 1923 by the Construction department. 

Exeter Distributing Station 

In order to supply power to the Exeter rural district the Commission 
authorized the purchase and installation of the equipment necessary to bring 
out a 4,000-volt rural feeder from the Exeter distributing station. This feeder 
is to be tapped off the Dashwood-Zurich feeder inside the station, and will be 
metered by a demand meter. 

Drawings are now being prepared and the work is expected to be completed 
early in 1923. 

London Municipal Station 

The new municipal station mentioned in last year's Report went into 
service in March, 1922, the work being done by the local Commission. 

GUELPH TRANSFORMER STATION 

The work of installing the bank of three 2,500-kv-a., oil-insulated, water- 
cooled, single-phase, 25-cycle, 63,500-110,000 Y/13,200-volt transformers, 
including differential-relay protection for the same, which was referred to in 
last year's Report, was carried out this year and placed in operation on May 29, 
1922. Designs have been prepared covering the changes required to install 
new 13, 200- volt, oil circuit-breakers in the switch compartments now used for 
the General Electric K-12 oil switches, have been in service since the station 
was built and whose rupturing capacity is no longer adequate. An order was 
placed with the Ferranti Meter and Transformer Manufacturing Company, 
Limited, for six 600-ampere and one 900-ampere, 13,200-volt, triple-pole, single- 
throw, oil circuit-breakers with mechanically-operated, remote-control mechan- 
ism, the complete equipment being manufactured by Ferguson, Pailin, Limited, 
Manchester, England. Designs have also been prepared covering protective 
screens in the lightning-arrester gallery, improvements in the oil piping systems 
to connect the 110,000 volt, oil circuit-breakers and the installation of a shower 
bath. 

Minor alterations to the building were necessary to accommodate the trans- 
formers referred to above and were duly carried out. 

PRESTON TRANSFORMER STATION 

Three 110, 000- volt line entrances were installed. 

Instructions for alterations to piping to accommodate transformers of 
larger capacity were issued in October. 

As mentioned in last year's Report, it was decided to increase the capacity 
of the 13,200-volt oil circuit-breakers purchased for use in the feeders when 
changing this station from 6,600 volts to 13,200 volts. It was also decided to 
change the original 6,600-volt, No. 1 transformer bank and its bus and feeders 
to 13,200 volts with a new bus and switch structure for this section. Balanced 



1923 HYDRO-ELECTRIC POWER COMMISSION 65 

relay protection was also installed on the two Gait feeders and improved relays 
were installed on the low-voltage transformer breakers. 

This installation was done by the Construction department and placed in 
service on May 28, 1922, and completed in June. 

In June, 1922, it was decided to replace No. 1 bank of 750-kv-a. trans- 
formers with a bank of 1,250-kv-a. transformers, together with the equipment 
necessary for differential relay protection for this bank. Two transformers were 
obtained from London transformer station and one from Guelph transformer 
station. A spare will later be secured from York transformer station. The new 
bank of transformers was placed in service on October 21, 1922, temporarily 
without differential relay protection and the remainder of the work, which is 
being done by the Construction department, will be completed early in 1923. 

Forbes Mills Substation 

In last year's Report it was stated that arrangements had been made to 
reduce the supply voltage from 6,600 volts to 2,200 volts and reconnect the three 
75-kv-a. transformers for the lower voltage. These changes were carried out 
with the modification that the voltage was reduced to 4,000 volts, not to 2,200 
volts, as originally proposed. 

Gait Municipal Station 

The new substation built by the local Commission was completed and placed 
in service in July, 1922. 

Grand River Valley Railway Substation at Preston 

The graphic demand-meter mentioned in last year's Report was placed in 
temporary service on November 18, 1921, and completed December 1, 1921. 

Hespeler Municipal Station 

Changes in supply voltage from 6,600 volts to 13,200 volts and rearranging 
station layout as mentioned in last year's Report were carried out and the station 
placed in temporary service on May 28, 1922, and the work completed on June 
22, 1922. The secondary voltage was also changed from 2,300 volts to 4,000 
volts, the work being done by the Construction department. In September the 
local Commission removed the three 75-kv-a. transformers, replacing them with 
three 170-kv-a., Canadian General Electric Company transformers obtained from 
Preston municipal station. 

Preston Municipal Station 

Changes in station layout and equipment, as mentioned in last year's Report, 
were carried out by local labour under the supervision of an engineer from the 
Canadian Westinghouse Company, completed and placed in service on May 28, 
1922. The secondary voltage was also changed from 2,300 volts to 4,000 volts. 

KITCHENER TRANSFORMER STATION 

Designs have been prepared covering the changes required to install new 
13,200-volt, oil circuit-breakers in the switch compartments now used for the 
G.E.K.-12, oil switches which have been in service since the station was built, and 
whose rupturing capacity is no longer sufficient. An order was placed with Fer- 
ranti Meter and Transformer Manufacturing Company, Limited, for ten 600- 
ampere and two 900-ampere, 13,200-volt, triple-pole, single-throw, oil circuit- 
breakers with mechanically-operated remote-control mechanism, the complete 
equipment being manufactured by Ferguson, Pailin, Limited, Manchester, Eng- 
land. Designs are also in hand covering the installation of a 13,200-volt emerg- 
ency bus with connection to each feeder, changes in the feeder relays, installation 
of a shower bath and a concrete settling basin. 

3 H.C. 



66 FIFTEENTH ANNUAL REPORT OF THE No. 49 

Kitchener Municipal Station No. 2 

The installation of the switching equipment mentioned in last year's Report 
was completed on December 13, 1921, by the Construction department and placed 
in service on April 9, 1922. 

St. Jacobs Distributing Station 

Estimates have been made up for changing the present distributing voltage 
from 550 volts to 4,000 volts by changing the transformer connections, also the 
installation of a new 4,000-volt feeder to Conestogo with a maximum-demand 
meter for this feeder at St. Jacobs distributing station. The St. Jacobs feeder 
is now metered at 4,000 volts instead of 550 volts, while the three 10-kv-a., pole- 
type transformers on the St. Jacobs feeder are being reconnected to step down 
from 4,000 to 550 volts instead of up to 4,000 volts as before. This work should 
be completed early in December, 1922, the work being carried out by the Con- 
struction department. 

South Waterloo Township Distributing Station 

Owing to the increasing load in this district, authorization was given in 
October, 1922, to install a 300-kv-a., 3 phase transformer at this station to replace 
the present bank of three 20-kv-a., single-phase transformers. This work will 
be done early in 1923. 

STRATFORD TRANSFORMER STATION 

During September and October plans were prepared covering alterations 
to the oil and air piping of No. 1 transformer bank in the station to accommodate 
1,250-kv-a. transformers. 

In December, 1921, authorization was given to install a bank of 1,250-kv-a. 
transformers in No. 1 pockets of this station, together with the equipment neces- 
sary for the differential protection for this bank and the necessary high- and low- 
tension switching equipment. One transformer was obtained from Kent trans- 
former station, where it had been stored on a reserve equipment work order. 
A second transformer was obtained from Stratford transformer station, where it 
had been stored on a reserve equipment work order. The spare transformer for 
No. 2 bank was taken and used as the third transformer for this bank, 

A rebuilt, oval-tank, type-"GA," oil-switch stored at Dundas transformer 
station was obtained and installed as a high-tension transformer breaker. The 
low-tension transformer breaker is a type-"K24." 

This installation will be completed early in 1923, the Construction depart- 
ment doing the work. 

On August 10, 1922, authorization was given to install a spare 1,250-kv-a. 
transformer in this station. This transformer was obtained from Kent trans- 
former station where it was held on a reserve equipment work order. This trans- 
former was installed in October, 1922. 

Drayton Metering Station 

The recording, reactive, volt-ampere meter mentioned in last year's Report 
was placed in temporary service on December 5, 1921, and its installation finally 
completed on December 31, 1921. 

Milverton Distributing Station 

Owing to the increasing load it was necessary to increase the transformer 
capacity at this station. Authorization was given in September, 1922, to replace 
the three 75-kv-a. transformers by three 150-kv-a. units obtained from Petrolia, 
where they were stored on a reserve equipment work order. This installation 
was done by the Construction department and was completed and the trans- 
formers placed in service on October 29, 1922. 



1923 HYDRO-ELECTRIC POWER COMMISSION 67 

The three 75-kv-a. transformers were shipped to Petrolia waterworks 
distributing station. 

Stratford Municipal Station 

The 750-kv-a., 3-phase transformer and 100-kv-a., 3-phase voltage regulator 
mentioned in last year's Report were installed by the Construction department, 
the work being completed on January 28, 1922. 

The transformer above mentioned broke down in service during the year, as 
a result of which the Engineering department made an inspection and report for 
the Stratford Public Utilities Commission, establishing the responsibility for 
repairs as lying with the manufacturers, who duly repaired and replaced it in 
service. 

ST. MARYS TRANSFORMER STATION 

Estimates were prepared covering the cost of a scheme to augment the cool- 
ing-water supply to accommodate additional transformer capacity anticipated. 

In August, 1922, authorization was given to install transformers of greater 
capacity in this station and plans are being prepared to cover this work, which 
will be completed early in 1923. 

St. Marys Cement Company Distributing Station 

Engineering information was supplied in connection with the replacement 
of a 500-kv-a., single-phase transformer that had broken down in service at that 
station. 

WOODSTOCK TRANSFORMER STATION 

In order to cope with the growing load, arrangements are being made to 
increase the transformer capacity of the above station by replacing the 1,250-kv-a. 
transformers with 2, 500-kv-a. units. This work will be completed early in 1923. 

The installation of two larger capacity current-transformers for metering 
on the rural feeder out of this station was found necessary due to increasing load. 
Arrangements have been made for this change, which will be done by the Oper- 
ating department, early in November. 

ST. THOMAS TRANSFORMER STATION 

Owing to increasing load the present bank of 750-kv-a. transformers is 
to be replaced by a bank of 1,250-kv-a. transformers with differential-relay 
protection. This work will be completed early in the coming year. 

Port Stanley Distributing Station 

The three 75-kv-a. transformers stored outside Port Stanley distributing 
station were shipped to London transformer station in January, 1922, for station 
service. 

BRANT TRANSFORMER STATION 

During the spring the installation of a deep well pump to pump water from 
the well inside the station was completed. A pump house also was erected. 

The deep well pump referred to above was transferred from Preston trans- 
former station. 

Brantford Municipal Station 

In March, 1922, on the recommendation of the Commission, the Brantford 
Hydro-Electric Commission authorized the installation on the two incoming lines 
entering their station of improved relay protection consisting of six reverse-power 
relays (three per line) and three inverse, definite-time, overload relays (three 
point) for the two lines; and also the moving of the switchboard panel with 
26,400-volt, totalizing meters from the high-tension room to the new control 



68 FIFTEENTH ANNUAL REPORT OF THE No. 49 

room. The installation was done by the Operating department, being completed 
in October. 

Lake Erie and Northern Railway Substation at Simcoe 

It was decided to install a graphic wattmeter in the Lake Erie and Northern 
Railway substation at Simcoe to replace the existing wattmeter. This installa- 
tion was made by the Operating department and the new meter placed in service 
on February 3, 1922. 

Simcoe Municipal Station — Port Dover Feeder 

The metering panel and 4,000-volt feeder for Port Dover mentioned in last 
year's Report was installed by the Construction department and completed and 
in service by December 22, 1921. 

COOKSVILLE TRANSFORMER STATION 

No changes were made in this station during the year. 
Port Credit Distributing Station 

The change in the low-tension voltage from 2,300 volts to 4,000 volts was 
deferred for a year. It is expected that this change will be effected early in 
1923. 

Mimico Distributing Station 

On account of transformer trouble this station has not been in use for some 
time. Etobicoke township and Mimico being fed from the Etobicoke distributing 
station. Arrangements therefore were made to move to York transformer 
station the three 150-kv-a. transformers, together with switching and metering 
equipment for two 4,000-volt feeders, to supply Etobicoke township from York 
transformer station. 

The switching equipment which will not be required in York transformer 
station will be transferred to the stores. 

KENT TRANSFORMER STATION 

Instructions were issued to the Construction department in July to purchase 
and install a shower bath in the station. This work was carried out during the 
summer. 

The relay protection on the incoming and outgoing 110,000-volt lines, 
mentioned in the 1921 Report, was completed and placed in service on November 
2, 1921, the Operating department doing the work. 

The increased transformer capacity mentioned in the 1921 Report was com- 
pleted and the bank of 2,500-kv-a. transformers (No. 2) was placed in service 
on December 11, 1921. The installation of the 26,400-volt emergency bus and 
the improved relay protection on the 26,400-volt feeders was completed and 
placed in service on September 15, 1922, the Construction department doing 
the installation. 

In August, 1922, authorization was given to further increase the transformer 
capacity of this station. It was decided to replace No. 1 bank of 1,250-kv-a. 
transformers with a bank of 2,500-kv-a. units together with the current-trans- 
formers required for the differential-relay protection for this bank. These trans- 
formers are to be obtained from Essex transformer station as soon as they are 
released, which will be early in 1923. 

Dominion Sugar Company — Wallaceburg 

The metering equipment mentioned in last year's Report was duly installed 
by the Operating department on March 1, 1922. 



1923 HYDRO-ELECTRIC POWER COMMISSION 69 

Fletcher Distributing Station 

In order to serve the villages of Merlin and Fletcher, authorization was 
given in October, 1922, to purchase and install the necessary equipment for a 
pole- type station at Fletcher with one 150-kv-a., 3-phase transformer installed. 
This station will be fed from Kent transformer station and will be completed in 
December. 

Forest Distributing Station — Thedford Feeder 

The power feeder to supply the village of Thedford mentioned in last year's 
Report was installed and placed in service on April 9, 1922, this work being done 
by the Construction department. 

Oil Springs Distributing Station 

The 150-kv-a., 3-phase, rural-class transformer mentioned in last year's 
Report was installed and placed in service on April 12, 1922, the work being 
carried out by the Construction department. The "RA" wattmeter was replaced 
by a graphic wattmeter and three ammeters were added. A number of minor 
repairs to the meter house were made, this latter work being done by the Operat- 
ing department and completed on April 6, 1922. 

Petrolia Distributing Station 

The 150-kv-a. transformers taken out of Petrolia and stored outside as 
reserve equipment were removed to Milverton distributing station in October, 
1922. 

Petrolia Waterworks Distributing Station 

In order to supply power to the Petrolia Waterworks, the Commission, on 
June 1, 1922, authorized the purchase and installation of the equipment for a 
pole-type station with a bank of three 75-kv-a. transformers to be transferred 
from Milverton distributing station. This station will be fed at 26,400 volts 
from Kent transformer station. This installation will be completed early in 
November, 1922. 

Watford Distributing Station 

The installation of the 4,000-volt feeder for the village of Alvinston and 
the replacement of the 50-kv-a. transformer at Watford by one of 150-kv-a., 
as mentioned in last year's Report, were carried out by the Construction depart- 
ment and placed in service on March 22, 1922. 

ESSEX TRANSFORMER STATION 

During November, 1921, instructions were issued to the Construction depart- 
ment to make alterations to the oil and water piping to accommodate a new bank 
(No. 2) of 5,000-kv-a. transformers, the work being subsequently carried out. 

Plans were prepared to increase the pumping capacity and to alter the 
piping to accommodate No. 1 bank of 5,000-kv-a. transformers. In connection 
with this work a pump was purchased from the Chippawa development. 

Minor alterations were made to the building during the year, including the 
installation of a shower bath. 

The installation of No. 2 bank of three 5,000-kv-a. transformers with one 
spare unit and 110, 000- volt switching equipment was completed and placed in 
service on December 12, 1921, with the 26,400- volt leads connected through 
disconnecting switches to the switching equipment for bank No. 2. 

The other changes mentioned in last year's Report were postponed to per- 
mit of more urgent work being done as conditions at Essex were satisfactory 
for the summer after the bank of 5,000 kv-a. transformers was placed in service. 



70 FIFTEENTH ANNUAL REPORT OF THE No. 49 

All the switching equipment for same is now at the station, and the installation 
will be started about November 15 and completed early in .1923. 

In August, 1922, the installation of a bank of 5,000-kv-a., 63,500/26,400- 
13,200-volt, oil-insulated, water-cooled transformers with suitable air-insulated 
current-transformers, to replace No. 1 bank of 2,500-kv-a. transformers, was 
authorized. These transformers are to be delivered about November 15, and 
will be installed by the Construction department under supervision of the 
manufacturing company's engineer. 

In October, the building of a septic tank for sewage disposal was authorized 
to replace the existing cesspool, which has proven inadequate. 

Belle River Distributing Station 

In order to supply power to the village of Belle River and also to the Belle 
River rural district, the Commission on May 9, 1922, authorized the purchase 
and installation of the equipment for a pole-type station to be fed from a new 
26,400-volt line from Essex transformer station. The station will consist of a 
150-kv-a., 3-phase, rural-class transformer with 26,400-volt choke-coils, discon- 
necting-switches and fuses, and two 4,000-volt feeders with fuses and demand 
meters. The work is being carried out by the Commission's Construction depart- 
ment and will be completed in December. 

Canard River Distributing Station 

In March, 1922, authorization was given to purchase and install disconnect- 
ing switches and fuses on the pole structure at this station on the high-tension 
side of the transformer between the transformer and the tap on to the main 26,400- 
volt line. This work has been deferred owing to the possibility of dismantling 
this station and serving the load from Amherstberg distributing station. 

Cottam Distributing Station 

In March, 1922, authorization was given to purchase and install air-break 
switches and fuses on the pole structure at this station on the high-tension side 
of the transformer between the transformer and the tap on to the main 26,400-volt 
line. This work was done by the Operating department and was completed and 
placed in service in September, 1922. 

Harrow Distributing Station 

In order to give better service from this station authorization was given 
in May, 1922, to install air-break switches and fuses on the pole structure on 
the high-tension side of the transformer between the transformer and the tap 
on the main 26,400-volt line. This work was done by the Operating department 
and was put in service on October 1, 1922. 

Petrimoux Distributing Station 

In June the building of a sub-station at Petrimoux Corners for supplying 
additional power to the Amherstburg section of the Essex division of the Hydro- 
Electric Power Commission railways was authorized. The building is 27 feet 6 
inches by 22 feet 10 inches, with roof pitched the narrow way to a centre ridge, 15 
feet high at the walls and 19 feet high at the ridge. The foundations and floor 
are of concrete, the sides are galvanized iron on angle-iron frame, and the roof 
is of 2-inch planking and ready roofing, supported by steel, channel-iron trusses. 
A small section at one side is enclosed with wood and glass partitions and wood 
ceiling to be used as an office. 

The electrical equipment includes the 26,400-volt switching equipment for 
one incoming line, one 550-kv-a. 26,400/440-volt, oil-filled transformer, one 500- 



1923 HYDRO-ELECTRIC POWER COMMISSION 7J 

kw., 750/600- volt rotary converter with a-c. and d-c. switching equipment, and 
switching equipment for two 600-volt d-c. outgoing feeders. 

The 26,400-volt line equipment with the exception of the current trans- 
formers, and the two 600-volt, d-c. outgoing feeder equipments, were obtained 
from the Whirlpool distributing station. The 550*kv-a. transformer was pur- 
chased from the Canadian General Electric Company. The 550-kw., rotary-con- 
verter with a-c. and d-c. switching equipment was obtained from the Montrose 
distributing station. Power is measured at 440 volts, a graphic wattmeter and 
watthour meter with necessary current and potential transformers being installed. 

The building was erected and the electrical equipment installed by the Con- 
struction department according to plans issued in June, and work was completed 
on October 31, 1922. 

Sarnia Municipal Station 

At the request of Sarnia Hydro-Electric system, a 100-kv-a., 4,000-volt, 
three-phase, feeder regulator was purchased from the Canadian Westinghouse 
Company in April, 1922, for installation in its station. Drawings are now ready 
and installation will be made by the Construction department about December 1, 
1922, as delivery of the regulator is promised for the latter part of November. 

Salt Block Substation of the Hydro-Electric Power Commission 

Railways 

In August, 1922, the installation of three 600-volt, d.c, outgoing-feeder 
equipments in the Salt Block substation of the Hydro-Electric Power Commission 
railways was authorized to replace three lower-capacity equipments owned by the 
Windsor Hydro-Electric system. These equipments, consisting of switchboard 
panels, carbon circuit-breakers, ammeters, and knife switches, were obtained 
from the Whirlpool distributing station and installed by the Windsor Hydro- 
Electric system, being placed in service on October 15, 1922. 

Walkerville Municipal Station 

Engineering assistance was given to the Walkerville Hydro-Electric system- 
in connection with the inspection and tests of one 1,000-kv-a., 3-phase, trans- 
former which it had purchased. These tests were completed on July 18, 1922. 

Windsor Municipal Station 

Engineering assistance was given the Windsor Hydro-Electric system in 
building an extension to the municipal station, 36 feet wide, 85 feet long and 
extending 46 feet above grade, as mentioned in the Annual Report of 1921. 

In February the building plans and specifications having been completed, 
were forwarded to the local Commission, who called for tenders for construction. 

Tenders were received in March and the contract awarded to Muxlow and 
Gale, contractors, in April, they undertaking to complete the building in 95 
working days. Steady progress was made and the building was practically 
completed in the time provided by the contract. 

In January, 1922, tenders were called for on the electrical equipment for 
the extension. Contracts for this equipment were awarded in April as follows: — 

The Canadian Westinghouse Company was given the contract for the supply 
and installation of both 26,400-volt and 4,000-volt switching equipment, includ- 
ing 26,400-volt, type-"G.A.3" and 4,000-volt, type-"B-13" oil-breakers, four 
100-kv-a. feeder regulators, and the switchboard. The Canadian General 
Electric Company was given the contract for the 26,400-volt, oxide-film arrester 
and the 5-kw., battery-charging, motor-generator set. The Moloney Electric 
Company undertook the contract for two 3,000-kv.-a., 26,400-13,200/2,300- 



72 FIFTEENTH ANNUAL REPORT OF THE No. 49 

4,000-volt, three-phase, 25-cycle transformers and three 50-kw., 2,200/220-110- 
volt, service transformers. The Exide Batteries of Canada, Limited, secured an 
order for the 60-cell, type-"E7" battery for operating the oil-breakers. The 
Standard Underground Cable Company undertook the supply of the three- 
conductor, 250,000 cm., paper-insulated, lead-covered, 4,000-volt cable and out- 
door potheads for the 4,000-volt outgoing feeders. 

On account of the destruction of the Moloney Electric Company's factory 
by fire early in September, it became necessary to cancel the contract for the 
transformers, and new tenders were called for on these in October. The three 
50-kv-a., service transformers were ordered direct by the Windsor Hydro- 
Electric system from the Canadian Crocker- Wheeler Company. Tenders on the 
two 3,000-kv-a. transformers are expected early in November, 1922. 

As the two new 3,000-kv-a. transformers would not be available for some 
time the Windsor Hydro-Electric Commission rented two 1,500-kv-a., Canadian 
Crocker- Wheeler Company transformers from the Commission's Niaraga system 
reserve equipment for use until such time as its own are available. 

The Canadian Westinghouse Company are installing the 26,400-volt and 
the 4,000-volt switching equipment connecting up to the 3,000-kv-a. transformers 
and making all connections to the outgoing potheads on the 4,000-volt feeders. 
The layout for the 4,000-volt outgoing feeders (underground) both inside and 
outside the station was designed by the Engineering department and will be 
installed by the local Commission. 

The lighting, heating, and the transformer, water and oil-piping layouts 
have been made up by the Engineering department and are being installed by the 
Construction department. The installation work is progressing favourably and 
it is expected to get this extension in service about January 1, 1923. 
Storehouse 

In June, instructions were received to give engineering assistance to the 
Windsor Hydro-Electric system in the preparation of plans for the erection of 
a storehouse approximately 80 feet by 42 feet with two storeys and a basement. 
The plans were issued in August but owing to estimated cost being higher than 
anticipated it was decided to reduce the length of the building by 20 feet and 
the plans were revised accordingly. In October the contract was let to Muxlow 
and Gale for a building 60 feet long. Construction was commenced by the 
contractor in October. The formal contract was forwarded to the Windsor 
Hydro-Electric system for signature on October 30, 1922. 

Instructions were received in October to purchase on behalf of the Local 
Commission a two-ton freight elevator for the above storehouse. The lighting 
and heating layout was made by the Commission's engineer and is so arranged 
as to be controlled by electrically operated breakers from the municipal station 
adjacent. Heating units of Hydro-Electric Power Commission make will be used. 

Tenders for the installation will be called for and the contract let locally. 

YORK TRANSFORMER STATION 

As additional transformer capacity was required, it was decided in July to 
install four of the 5,000-kv-a. transformers purchased from the Canadian General 
Electric Company for use on the Niagara system. These transformers have been 
placed on concrete foundations located outdoors to the north of the present 
station and necessary alterations in building and piping have been made. A 
13,200-volt, oil circuit-breaker purchased from the Canadian Westinghouse 
Company will be installed for the new transformer bank and at the same time 
the 13,200-volt bus will be changed and larger cable installed. These new trans- 
formers will be placed in service during November. 



1923 HYDRO-ELECTRIC POWER COMMISSION 73 

The four 1,250-kv-a. transformers removed from this station will be shipped 
to Preston transformer station. 

To control the two 13,200-volt lines being erected to feed Weston and Wood- 
bridge, two oil circuit-breakers have been purchased from the Canadian Westing- 
house Company. It is proposed to have these breakers and the other equipment 
for the feeders installed as soon as the 1,250-kv-a. transformers are removed from 
the station. 

The three 150-kv-a. transformers, together with switching equipment for 
two 4, 000- volt feeders from Mimico distributing station, are to be moved to York 
transformer station and installed to supply power to Etobicoke township. The 
transformers which have recently been repaired by the Operating department 
have already been placed in the station. 

All this work in the York transformer station is being done by the Con- 
struction department. 

Etobicoke Distributing Station 

In June, 1922, authorization was given to change the metering equipment 
on the Brown's Copper and Brass Rolling Mills feeder in this station as. the 
existing graphic wattmeter and reactive, kilovolt-ampere meter were not suitable 
for this fluctuating load. They were replaced by a Lincoln graphic wattmeter 
and a Lincoln reactive, kilovolt-ampere meter. This installation was done 
by the Operating department and the meters placed in service on July 20, 1922. 

In February, 1922, authorization was given to make the necessary changes 
in the metering connections in this station so that the Goodyear load may be 
metered separately from that of New Toronto. 

This work was done by the Operating department and was completed and 
placed in service on May 16, 1922. 

Weston Municipal Station 

At the request of the Weston Water, Light and Power Commission, engineer- 
ing assistance was given covering the purchase of three 300-kv-a., single-phase 
transformers to replace the three 100-kv-a. transformers previously in service. 
The installation work was done by the Construction department and was com- 
pleted and the transformers placed in service on July 28, 1922. 

HAMILTON TRANSFORMER STATION 

In January a galvanized-iron storehouse was constructed on the grounds. 
The plans for the high- and low- tension, switching towers and the switching 
and control building were started in May, 1922, and completed in August. 

The contract for the high- and low-tension switching steel structures was 
let in June to the Canadian Bridge Company. This steelwork has been received 
and erected by the Construction department. 

In July the Construction department started the necessary excavation for 
the building and footings and have now constructed the concrete footings for 
the switching structures, transformers and breakers, also the transfer track for 
transformers. 

In August the contract for the steel framework for the switching and con- 
trol building was let to the Canadian Bridge Company. This has now been 
received and partially erected by the Construction department. In September 
the contract for the concrete and masonry of the switching and control building 
was let to the Piggott-Healy Construction Company, who have now completed 
the concrete basement walls. 

The necessary water supply for the station was obtained from the city of 
Hamilton water main on the Beach road. A 6-inch water main was laid from 
this point into the station by the Construction department. 



74 FIFTEENTH ANNUAL REPORT OF THE No. 49 

The following station equipment has been ordered and delivered: — One 50- 
ton transformer transfer truck from the Herbert Morris Crane and Hoist 
Company, one 1,000 gallon switch-oil tank and one 4,200-gallon, transformer-oil 
tank, both from the Toronto Iron Works, one 30-gallon-per-minute oil pump and 
motor from Darling Brothers, Limited, and steel window sash from Canadian 
Metal Window and Steel Products. 

The following station mechanical equipment has been ordered: — One air 
compressor having a capacity of 23 cubic feet of free air per minute from the 
Storey Pump and Equipment Company, two 3,000-gallon-per-minute water 
pumps from the Northern Foundry and Machine Company, and an oil drying 
and purifying outfit from William R. Perrin, Limited. 

Plans are now under way for water, oil and air piping for transformers and 
breakers. 

Work on the foundations and steel work as outlined in last year's Report, was 
started during the latter part of June, 1922, and the installation of the electrical 
equipment begun about September 1. On October 1, the station was tested out 
for service with one 110, 000- volt breaker (non-automatic), one bank of 5,000- 
kv-a. transformers, two temporary outgoing 13,200-volt feeder equipments, 
including "GA-3" oil breakers (indoor type, each housed in a small temporary 
wooden building), and 13,200-volt metering equipment consisting of graphic 
wattmeter and reactive, volt-ampere meter, current and potential transformers, 
housed in a small wooden building. The station was placed in service on October 
8, 1922. The permanent equipment will be completed and placed in service 
early in 1923. 

Saltfleet Distributing Station 

The 400-kv-a., 3-phase, pole-type station mentioned in last year's Report 
was placed in temporary service on February 14, 1922, and completed by the 
Construction department on April 7, 1922. 

TORONTO POWER COMPANY 

A considerable amount of plant inspection and inventory checking of plant 
equipment has been done in connection with taking over the "plant and works" 
of the Toronto Power Company under the purchase agreement. 

SEVERN SYSTEM 

BIG CHUTE GENERATING STATION 

The installation of the air compressor, as outlined in last year's Report, was 
completed and placed in service on April 29, 1922. 

Suggested Port Severn Development 

It was decided in October, 1922, to carry on preliminary engineering in 
connection with the investigation and design of a development at Port Severn 
on the Severn River to augment the power supply on the Severn system. 
Alliston Distributing Station 

Instructions were received in May, 1921, to replace the graphic-recording 
demand-meter on the Alliston feeder in the Alliston distributing station with a 
graphic wattmeter for more accurate power measurement. This change of meters 
was made by the Operating department and the new meter placed in service on 
February 23, 1922. 

Collingwood Electric Castings Distributing Station 

Instructions were received in April, 1922, covering the purchase of three 
300-kv-a., single-phase, 60-cycle transformers and their installation in the original 



1923 



HYDRO-ELECTRIC POWER COMMISSION 



75 




HAMILTON— NIAGARA SYSTEM 
Transformer station from north-east, October 5, 1922 




SALTFLEET— NIAGARA SYSTEM 
Distributing station, February 14, 1922 



76 FIFTEENTH ANNUAL REPORT OF THE No. 49 

Collingwood No. 2 distributing station to serve the Collingwood Electric Castings 
Company at 2,200 volts. These transformers were purchased from the Moloney 
Electric Company, on April 8, 1922. 

Instructions were issued to the Construction department in April, 1922, 
and the transformers were installed and placed in service by May 7, 1922. 

An inspection was made of one of these transformers which failed in service 
on July 17. This unit was repaired by the manufacturers and returned to service 
on September 2. 

All switching equipment is owned by the Collingwood Commission. 

Midland (G.T.R. Tiffin) Distributing Station 

Instructions were received in May, 1922, covering the construction of a 
22,000-volt brick distributing station at the Midland G.T.R. Tiffin elevator on 
a site owned by the Grand Trunk Railway and adjacent to its present steam 
power house. Plans and specifications covering a brick and concrete building 
25 ft. 8 in. by 29 ft. 2 in. and its equipment were prepared and were forwarded 
to the Construction department, who carried out the work. Work was started on 
August 1, 1922, and the station placed in service on September 16, 1922. 

This station is fed by two incoming 22,000-volt lines tapped from the main 
trunk lines to Penetang. Each line equipment is complete with electrolytic 
arrester, disconnecting switches, choke-coils, "GA-3" breaker and two K.9 
current-transformers. All equipment with the exception of the current-trans- 
formers was obtained from storage at the dismantled Durham Cement Company 
distributing station. A bank of three 400-kv-a., single-phase, 60-cycle, 22,000- 
2,300/575-volt, oil-insulated, self-cooled transformers has been installed, these 
also having been obtained from the Durham Cement Company distributing 
station. The low-tension equipment is owned by the Grand Trunk Railway, the 
Commission's equipment with the exception of metering transformers and 
meters being confined to the new station. All low-tension equipment is installed 
in the Grand Trunk Railway power house. The metering equipment which is 
owned by the Commission is installed on a panel in the G.T.R. power house and 
comprises a graphic wattmeter, graphic-recording, reactive, volt-ampere meter 
and a switchboard, watthour meter. This panel, which is of blue Vermont 
marble, is installed at the left of, and lines up with, the G.T.R. switchboard. 

No G.T.R. equipment is installed in the Commission's distributing station. 

Port McNicoll Distributing Station 

Increased transformer capacity being required at the Port McNicoll dis- 
tributing station, instructions were received in November, 1921, to purchase and 
install a third 15-kv-a. transformer. A service transformer of this rating was 
purchased in December, 1921, and instructions issued to the Operating depart- 
ment for its installation. 

This work was completed and the bank with three transformers placed in 
service on December 30, 1921. 

EUGENIA SYSTEM 

Chesley Distributing Station 

Instructions were received in May, 1921, to replace the graphic-recording 
demand-meter on the Chesley feeder in Chesley distributing station with a graphic 
wattmeter for more accurate power measurement. This change of meters was 
made by the Operating department and the new meter placed in service on 
February 14, 1922. 



1923 HYDRO-ELECTRIC POWER COMMISSION 77 

Dundalk Distributing Station 

Instructions were received in May, 1921, to replace the graphic-recording 
demand-meter on the Dundalk feeder in Dundalk distributing station with a 
graphic wattmeter for more accurate power measurement. This change of meters 
was made by the Operating department and the new meter placed in service on 
February 20, 1922. 

Durham Distributing Station 

The requirements for power at the John E. Russell Company's plant necessi- 
tated the removal of the three 100-kv-a. transformers from Durham distributing 
station to that point and their replacement with the original bank of three 50-kv-a. 
transformers. Instructions covering this change were issued to the Construction 
department on April 19, 1922. 

This interchange of transformers was carried out on April 30, 1922, and 
the new bank placed in service on that date. 

Instructions were received in December, 1921, to replace the graphic-demand 
meter on the Durham feeder with a graphic wattmeter and to install a graphic- 
recording, reactive, volt-ampere meter on this feeder to operate in conjunction 
with the graphic wattmeter. This work was carried out by the Operating depart- 
ment and the new metering installation placed in service on March 30, 1922. 

Durham Russell Distributing Station 

Instructions were received in March, 1922, covering the construction of a 
22,000-volt, pole-type station on a site provided by the John E. Russell Company 
at Durham to supply power to that Company. 

Plans were prepared in April, 1922, and forwarded to the Construction 
department with instructions to carry out this work. Work was started in April 
and the station completed and placed in service on May 7, 1922. 

This station is connected to both high-tension trunk lines running past this 
property to Mount Forest. Two air-break switches are mounted on this structure 
and the lines are bussed together on the structure dropping down through choke- 
coils and fuses to the transformer bank. The three lOO^kv-a., outdoor trans- 
formers originally installed in Durham distributing station were moved to this 
station and placed in service. All low-tension equipment is owned by the John 
E. Russell Company with the exception of metering potential-transformers, 
graphic wattmeter and recording, reactive, volt-ampere meter, which are the 
property of the Commission. This equipment is mounted on the customer's 
panel. 

Grand Valley Distributing Station 

Instructions were received in May, 1921, authorizing the replacement of the 
graphic demand-meter on the Arthur feeder in the Grand Valley distributing 
station with a graphic wattmeter, and also the installation of a graphic-record- 
ing, reactive, volt-ampere meter to operate in conjunction with the wattmeter. 
Prior to the carrying out of this change, superseding instructions were issued 
in April, 1922, requesting that this work be not proceeded with and authorizing 
the installation of a metering station at the outskirts of Arthur. This metering 
station was proceeded with and in May, 1922, the meters in Grand Valley station 
on this feeder were dismantled and shipped to Durham for service in the Durham 
Russell distributing station. Work in Grand Valley distributing station was 
completed on May 23, 1922. 

Hanover Distributing Station 

The switching station immediately to the rear of the Hanover distributing 



78 FIFTEENTH ANNUAL REPORT OF THE No. 49 

station, as outlined in last year's Report, was completed and placed in service on 
February 11, 1922. The 300-kv-a., 4,000-volt synchronous condenser purchased 
by the municipality in September, 1921, as mentioned in last year's Report, was 
also installed by the Construction department and placed in service on February 
11, 1922. More adequate telephone equipment was installed during March, 1922. 
Kincardine Distributing Station 

Work is proceeding on the installation of larger capacity fuses in the incom- 
ing 22,000-volt line and smaller ratio current- transformers in the Kincardine 
feeder at Kincardine distributing station for increased efficiency in the operation 
of this station. This work should be completed in December, 1922. 
Mount Forest Distributing Station 

Instructions were received in May, 1921, to replace the graphic-recording 
demand-meter on the Mount Forest feeder in Mount Forest distributing station 
with a graphic wattmeter for more accurate power measurement. This change 
of meters was made by the Operating Department and the new meter placed in 
service on January 13, 1922. 

Orangeville Distributing Station 

Instructions were received in May, 1921, to replace the graphic-recording 
demand-meter on the Orangeville feeder in Orangeville distributing station with 
a graphic wattmeter for more accurate power measurement. This change of 
meters was made by the Operating department and the new meter placed in 
service on January 22, 1922. 

Owen Sound Distributing Station 

The installation of a wattmeter in Owen Sound station as mentioned in last 
year's Report to replace the graphic demand-meter was carried out by the 
Operating department on January 4, 1922, and the new meter was placed in 
service on that date. 

WASDELLS SYSTEM 

Greenbank Distributing Station 

Instructions were received in May, 1922, covering the erection of a 22,000- 
volt, 150-kv-a. rural-class station on a site purchased by the Commission at 
Greenbank to serve the municipalities of Uxbridge and Port Perry, at 4,000 
volts. The contract for the transformer was placed with the Canadian General 
Electric Company in June, and the transformer delivered to Greenbank during 
September, 1922. 

The station is located at the end of the 22,000-volt line from the Wasdells 
Falls generating station and the high-tension equipment includes choke-coils, 
fuses and disconnecting switches. The transformer rating is 150-kv-a., three 
phase, 60-cycle, 22,000-20,900-19,500/2,300-4,000 volts, oil-insulated, self-cooled, 
outdoor type. 

Low-tension equipment includes fuses, cut-outs, standard metering station 
with an indicating demand-meter and lightning arresters. One low-tension line 
is fed out of this station and branches some distance from the station to the two 
municipalities. 

Telephone equipment is mounted on the pole immediately in front of the 
station. 

This station was placed in service on September 29, 1922. 

MUSKOKA SYSTEM 



There were no changes made on this system during the year. 



1923 



HYDRO-ELECTRIC POWER COMMISSION 



79 




80 FIFTEENTH ANNUAL REPORT OF THE No. 49 

ST. LAWRENCE SYSTEM 

Alexandria Distributing Station 

The graphic-recording wattmeter and the graphic-recording, reactive, volt- 
ampere meter at this station were replaced with graphic meters of more suitable 
type, the latter being placed in service on July 6, 1922. 

Brockville Distributing Station 

Due to raising the transmission voltage of the St. Lawrence system from 
26,400-volts to 44,000-volts, extensive changes were made in the high-voltage 
apparatus of Brockville distributing station in order to permit of this station 
being operated at 44,000-volts. 

The type-"E," 26,400-volt, oil circuit-breaker was replaced by a type- 
"G.A.3," 300-ampere, 44,000-volt breaker obtained from Montrose distributing 
station on the Niagara system. Three new type-"O.B.," 44,000-volt current- 
transformers were transferred from Cornwall to replace the two 26,400-volt 
current-transformers. A 44,000-volt, oxide-film lightning-arrester was pur- 
chased from the Canadian General Electric Company and was used to replace 
the existing 26,000-volt electrolytic arrester in this station. The 26,400-volt 
insulators, bus work, line entrances, etc., were replaced by 44,000-volt equipment. 
The new 44,000-volt apparatus has been installed in this station in such a manner 
as to leave room for a future, second 44,000-volt, incoming line. 

The installation of the 44,000-volt apparatus was completed and it was 
placed in service first at 26,400-volts on September 3, 1922. Later, on October 
1, the voltage was changed over to 44,000-volts. 

Chesterville Distributing Station 

Work is under way on the installation of protective equipment on the 
Chesterville rural-power-district feeder in Chesterville distributing station. 
This feeder was formerly connected to the Chesterville distribution system but 
has now been brought into and is fed from the station itself. 

Cornwall (Howard Smith Paper Mills Limited) Distributing Station 

Due to raising the transmission voltage of the St. Lawrence system from 
26,400 volts to 44,000 volts certain changes were made in the high-tension 
apparatus to permit of this station being operated at the higher voltage. The 
26,400-volt, electrolytic lightning-arrester was replaced by a 44,000-volt oxide- 
film arrester. 

A third 46,000-volt current-transformer was purchased and installed with 
the original two 46,000-volt current- transformers. Ground connections were 
provided in the station to permit of the grounding of the high-tension lines 
feeding this station when necessary. This new apparatus was placed in service 
first at 26,400 volts on September 9, 1922. On October 1, the voltage was raised 
to 44,000 volts. 

Due to additional power requirements, changes and additions are being 
made to the Howard Smith Paper Mills Limited, 600-volt equipment in Cornwall 
(Howard Smith Paper Mills Limited) distributing station. 

In March, 1922, the Howard Smith Paper Mills Limited purchased from 
the Canadian Westinghouse Company four new, 600-volt feeder-panels complete 
with oil circuit-breakers, totalizing metering equipment, meters and relays. In 
addition the Commission at the request of the Paper Company purchased bus-bar 
equipment, cables and pipe structure and are at present installing them in this 
station together with the four new feeder-panels purchased by the Paper Com- 
pany. 



1923 HYDRO-ELECTRIC POWER COMMISSION 81 

The transformer mains are being changed over so that the new, 600-volt bus, 
to which the four new feeders are connected, will be fed from the 1,500-kv-a., 
3-phase transformer, while the present three feeders will be fed from the 750-kv-a., 
3-phase transformer. 

It is expected that this work will be completed during December, 1922. 

CORNWALL TRANSFORMER STATION 

As projected in last year's Report the installation of four 5,000-kv-a. trans- 
formers in their permanent pockets in Cornwall transformer station and the re- 
moval and re-installation of the original 1,250-kv-a. bank in the temporary 
station were carried out by the Construction department, the equipment being 
placed in. service on October 1, 1922, in its permanent location. As the original 
transformer pockets were to be used for the new transformers, it was necessary 
to install and place the 5,000-kv-a., transformer bank in temporary service out- 
doors while the 1,250-kv-a. bank was removed to the temporary station. After- 
wards service was changed back to the original transformers and it was then pos- 
sible to move the new transformers into their permanent pockets in the station. 

Building changes necessary were carried out under instructions issued on 
March 10, while the new transformers were in service outdoors. 

The capacity of the 15-ton crane was increased to permit of lifting the 5,000- 
kv-a. transformer by stiffening the bridge beams with channel iron and purchas- 
ing a second identical trolley to operate in conjunction with the present one. 

In April a second 30-ton, transformer transfer truck was purchased and 
instructions were issued for an extension to the transformer truck runway to 
permit of the interchange of the larger transformers within the station. 

A 3,300-gallon oil-storage tank was purchased in May, 1922, from the 
Toronto Iron Works along with a Canadian Fairbanks Morse No. 4, rotary, 
geared, motor-driven oil-pump ordered in August and installed in the basement 
of the station. Plans were prepared and instructions issued to the Construction 
department during May, covering all changes and additions to the oil and water 
piping and the installation of the oil tank which was shipped to the site in June. 

The four 750-kv-a., 25-cycle transformers on loan from the Niagara system 
were moved outside the temporary station and they have been adequately pro- 
tected from the weather. They are being stored at this point until required 
elsewhere. 

Instructions were received in March, 1922, covering changes in the Cornwall 
station to permit of the operation of the St. Lawrence system at 44,000 volts. 
Two 44,000-volt, oxide-film arresters were purchased in May, 1922, and installed 
on the two 44,000-volt, outgoing, system lines, replacing the 26,400-volt, electro- 
lytic arresters. This work was completed and the station voltage changed on 
October 1, 1922. 

Eugene Phillips Electrical Works Limited, Brockville 

Metering equipment, consisting of one graphic-recording wattmeter and one 
graphic-recording, reactive, volt-ampere meter together with one watthour meter 
was installed in the Eugene Phillips Company's substation at Brockville to 
measure the power being supplied to its new plant. 

MORRISBURG TRANSFORMER STATION 

A new outdoor station was erected at Morrisburg to transform power from 
44,000 volts to 26,400 volts for use in the district directly north of that town. 
Two outdoor, combination, switching sets, each consisting of a three-pole, 200- 
ampere, air-break switch, choke-coils, lightning-arresters and fuses, both sets 



82 FIFTEENTH ANNUAL REPORT OF THE No. 49 

being suitable for 44,000-volt service, were purchased from the Monarch Electric 
Company. These sets were erected on a pole structure which was constructed 
for a station which would accommodate two three-phase, 300-kv-a transformers. 
One outdoor 300-kv-a., 60-cycle, 3-phase, 44,000Y/26,400A-volt transformer with 
spare parts was purchased from the Packard Electric Company and installed. 
The station was placed in service on October 1, 1922. 

Prescott Distributing Station 

This station which was formerly supplied with power at 26,400 volts was 
equipped during the year for operation at 44,000 volts. One outdoor, com- 
bination, switching set, consisting of a three-pole, 200-ampere, air-break switch, 
choke-coils, lightning-arresters and fuses for 44,000-volt service was purchased 
from the Monarch Electric Company. This equipment was erected on a four- 
pole structure located directly in front of the high-voltage entrances of the station 
building. One standard, outdoor, 300-kv-a., 60-cycle, 3-phase, 44,000-26,000/ 
4, 160-2, 400-600- volt transformer was purchased from the Packard Electric 
Company and installed at the pole structure. The 2, 400- volt feeders were re- 
arranged and one new feeder circuit for the Prescott Rural service was added. 
The remodelled station was placed in service on October 1, 1922. 

RIDEAU SYSTEM 

Grenville Crushed Rock Company, Deeks 

Metering equipment consisting of one graphic-recording wattmeter and one 
graphic-recording, reactive, volt-ampere meter was installed in the Grenville 
Crushed Rock Company's substation at Deeks to measure the power being sup- 
plied to its plant. This equipment was placed in service on June 23, 1922. 

HIGH FALLS GENERATING STATION 

Flange pulleys were installed on the 25-kw. exciters to prevent the driving 
belt slipping off. 
Operator's House 

During the year a well was drilled for the supply of drinking water for the 
operator's house and material was supplied for fencing in a garden and building 
an ice house, the work being done by the operators. 

Kemptville Distributing Station 

This station, which was fully described in last year's Report, was placed in 
service on November 24, 1921. 

Perth Distributing Station 

Arrangements were made with the Bell Telephone Company at Perth distri- 
buting station for the installation of a special switchboard which would permit 
the Commission's telephone system to be temporarily connected to the Bell 
system at times when it was necessary to use "long distance." This particular 
equipment was actually installed in the municipal pumping station which is just 
alongside the distributing station so as to be more convenient for the operators. 

THUNDER BAY SYSTEM 

NIPIGON GENERATING STATION 

During the earlier part of the year several details required to complete the 
station were carried out, such as installation of hatch covers, painting of floors, 
and installation of end-wall fire protection. 



1923 HYDRO-ELECTRIC POWER COMMISSION 83 

In June an air compressor unit was purchased from the Canadian Ingersoll 
Rand Company and instructions were subsequently issued to the Operating 
department to install same. 
Operators' Houses 

During the year purchase were made of pumps and equipment for supplying 
the houses and station with water for domestic use, also for fire fighting. The 
pumps, tanks, etc., were located in the basement of the generating station and 
the work of installation, including piping to the houses, was carried out. 

The fire pump was also connected up to the supply pipe to the construction 
camps and to the end wall sprinkler line and stand pipe. 

The work of erecting the fourth detached house referred to in last year's 
Report was not commenced until September, 1922. This house is now being 
erected and will be completed during the winter. 

OTTAWA SYSTEM 

Owing to the growth of load in Ottawa the municipal authorities installed 
an additional feeder. An extension to the Commission's metering equipment 
was thus necessitated to totalize the load on the system. Work is in hand on 
this extension. 

CENTRAL ONTARIO AND TRENT SYSTEM 

In the 1921 Report it was noted that the work of grounding the neutrals of 
the generators was under way. This work has not been proceeded with owing 
to complications in the switching equipment. 

Auburn Switching Station 

The relay protection in Auburn switching station which is one of the loop 
stations in the 44,000-volt lines, required alteration to conform to a change in the 
system protective equipment for sequence of breaker operation during trouble. 
This work was undertaken by the Operating department and completed during 
March, 1922. The six 80- to 5-ampere current-transformers in the lines to 
Healey Falls and Port Hope were removed and replaced with new currerft- 
transformers of the same type of 150- to 5-ampere ratio. Reverse-power relays 
were already installed in the line to Healey Falls and it was only necessary to 
install a ground relay at this point. New reverse-power and ground relays were 
purchased for the line to Port Hope and installed. 

Belleville Service Building 

The 300-kv. testing transformer and auxiliary equipment, which was 
formerly installed in the Sidney Terminal station, was transferred during the 
year to the service building in Belleville, as this is a very much more convenient 
location for this equipment. 

Belleville Lehigh Cement Company Distributing Station 

Additional metering, consisting of a polyphase wattmeter with a volt-ampere 
demand-transformer, is being installed. 

Belleville Switching Station 

Ammeters were installed on each phase of the four high-tension lines in 
Belleville switching station. This work was completed and placed in service 
on June 26, 1922. 

To improve the relay protection of the 44,000-volt lines in the loop stations 
of the Central Ontario system, a new system of relays and instrument trans- 



84 FIFTEENTH ANNUAL REPORT OF THE No. 49 

formers was installed in the Belleville switching station by the Operating depart- 
ment and placed in service on June 26, 1922. The two 120-60/5-ampere current- 
transformers were removed from the bus-tie switch and installed in conjunction 
with identical transformers in the lines to Sidney and Healey Falls to complete a 
three-unit bank in these lines. 

Six unidirectional relays and two ground relays were purchased and installed 
in the two loop lines. Inverse definite-time, overload relays and ground relays 
were also installed on the Belleville tap and on the lines to the Belleville Cement 
Company and the Lehigh Cement Company. 

Brighton Distributing Station 

The metering equipment in Brighton station is being supplemented by the 
installation of a Lincoln demand-meter. 

CAMPBELLFORD GENERATING STATION (DAM NO. 11) 

This station was affected by the requirements for more adequate relay pro- 
tection in the loop stations on the 44,000-volt lines of the Central Ontario system. 
One 160-80/5-ampere transformer was purchased and installed in the line to 
Healey Falls to complete a bank of three units. Unidirectional relays and a 
ground relay were installed in this line. No other equipment was affected. 

This work was completed by the Operating department on August 18, 1922. 

Chemical Products Company, Limited 

Adequate metering equipment, consisting of graphic meters, was required 
in this station owing to the increase in load. This work was completed during 
November, 1921. 

Cobourg Distributing Station 

On account of the increased load at Cobourg, one of the 300-kv-a. trans- 
formers was replaced by a 750-kv-a. unit. 

Additional heating equipment was installed in order to overcome trouble 
with the water piping freezing during winter. 

It was found advisable to provide a garage for the patrolman located at 
Cobourg. 

Colborne Distributing Station 

The electrolytic lightning arrester was replaced by one of a water barrel 
type. This was placed in service during October, 1922. 

FENELON FALLS GENERATING STATION 

In order to supply general power house and cottage lightning a service trans- 
former was installed in the generating station. This work was placed in service 
during December, 1921. 

Frankford Canning Company 

Lighting and power metering equipment were installed on this company's 
property. The installation was completed during October, 1922. 

HEALEY FALLS GENERATING STATION 

Inadequate relay protection in the loop stations on the 44,000-volt lines of 
the Central Ontario system necessitated the installation of a new system of pro- 
tective equipment to limit the number of interruptions of stations on the loop to 
a minimum. Three current-transformers of 150-300/5-ampere ratio were 
purchased for Healey Falls generating station and these were installed in the 
44,000-volt line to Auburn. The two current-transformers in this line were 
installed in the lines to Sidney and Campbellford, making up a bank of three 



1923 



HYDRO-ELECTRIC POWER COMMISSION 



85 




RANNEY FALLS DEVELOPMENT— CENTRAL ONTARIO AND TRENT SYSTEM 
Generating station progress: South elevation, June 30, 1922 




RANNEY FALLS DEVELOPMENT— CENTRAL ONTARIO AND TRENT SYSTEM 
Generating station progress: East elevation, June 30, 1922 



86 FIFTEENTH ANNUAL REPORT OF THE No. 49 

transformers in each line. Unidirectional and ground relays were installed in 
the three lines. This work was completed during September, 1922. 

As this is the key station in the three loops, the neutrals of the three trans- 
former banks were solidly grounded, the neutral being brought through the 
cover by means of a copper stud. The neutral at this station is grounded under 
all conditions of operation. This work was completed by the Operating depart- 
ment during September, 1922. 

Marmora Distributing Station 

Due to high maintenance charges and the small load on this station, the 
graphic meters installed at this point were not satisfactory and were replaced 
with a demand-meter with a volt-ampere demand-transformer. This was placed 
in service during January, 1922. 

Newcastle Distributing Station 

The electrolytic lightning arrester was replaced by one of the water-barrel 
type. This change was made during October, 1922. 

Norwood Distributing Station 

Due to difficulties in keeping the graphic meters in this station operating 
satisfactorily, they were removed and replaced by demand-meters with volt- 
ampere demand-transformers, one of each of the above being installed on the 
feeder supplying Norwood and Havelock. They were placed in service during 
January, 1922. 

Peterboro Distributing Station 

Revised estimates for the new substation contemplated by the Peterboro 
Public Utility Commission were submitted during the year for the consideration 
of the commissioners. 

Port Hope Switching Station 

Ammeters were installed in this station, on the lines to Trenton and Peter- 
boro. The work was completed during June, 1922. 

A new system of relays and instrument transformers was purchased and 
installed in the Port Hope switching station and placed in service on April 5, 
1922. The existing line current-transformers and also those on the 44,000-volt 
line to Oshawa were replaced with nine 150-300/5-ampere current-transformers, 
three being installed in each line. Unidirectional and ground relays were in- 
stalled in the lines to Auburn and Sidney stations, while inverse definite time 
overload relays and a ground relay were installed in the Oshawa feeder. The 
removed equipment was used at other points. 

This work was undertaken by the Operating department. 

RANNEY FALLS GENERATING STATION 

Progress 

During the year the building plans were completed and plans for oil, water 
and air systems were undertaken and completed. Purchases were made of water 
and oil pumps, lubricating-oil filter, oil tank and air compressor. Instructions 
were issued to the Construction department for the installation of all the above 
material and numerous inspections were made of the work. 

In the endeavour to have this station ready for service for the autumn 
load construction work was carried on through the winter and the following is 
an outline of the progress made. 

Steel work erection was started on December 1, 1921, and completed on 
January 21, 1922. 



923 



HYDRO-ELECTRIC POWER COMMISSION 



87 




RANNEY FALLS DEVELOPMENT— CENTRAL ONTARIO AND TRENT SYSTEM 
Generating station progress: Pouring No. 1 supply pipe and erection of generator room columns. 

December 1, 1921 




RANNEY FALLS DEVELOPMENT— CENTRAL ONTARIO AND TRENT SYSTEM 
Generating station progress: Transformer wing main floor reinforcing. February 1, 1922 



88 FIFTEENTH ANNUAL REPORT OF THE No. 49 

Stone work commenced during January, 1922, and was completed on May 
31, 1922. 

The generator-room crane was erected on February 8, 1922. 

The gate-house crane was erected on February 11, 1922. 

The concrete-switch-structure was completed on May 13, 1922. 

The roof was completed on June 17, 1922. 

Generator erection began on April 8, 1922, and the first unit was placed in 
service on August 22, 1922, and the second on September 5, 1922. At the 
present time power is supplied from this station to the Central Ontario System 
net-work over the Healey Falls — Sidney, 44,000-volt line only. Provision has 
been made also to tie into the Campbellford-Stirling, 44,000-volt line but this 
line has not as yet been extended to the station. No low-tension feeders have 
been installed although provision has been made for them. 

In general, the entire building construction and installation of all the equip- 
ment with the exception of the ventilating system for the control room were 
completed by the end of October, 1922. 

A full description of this plant with illustrations follows. 
Building Superstructure 

The superstructure which measures 106 feet by 85 feet including the gener- 
ator room, the switch-rooms, control-room and gate house is constructed of a 
structural steel frame with reinforced concrete floor and roof slabs and with 
walls of concrete and stone masonry. 

The base and plinth up to the top of the sills of the large semi-circular-arched 
windows is of concrete with rubbed finish while above the sills the walls are of 
broken-coursed, squared-stone masonry pointed in chocolate-coloured mortar, 
the interior of the walls except in the gate house being lined with three-inch, 
hollow- tile plastered. The inside of exterior walls of the gate house has the 
plaster applied to the stonework. The walls are surmounted by a heavy concrete 
coping. 

The choice of material for constructing the walls was made on account of the 
close proximity of blue gray limestone, the greater part of which was obtained 
from the tailrace excavation dump. 

The concrete roof slab is covered by tarred felt and gravel roofing with 
metal flashing. 

The interior walls are built of concrete or hollow tile, the concrete walls 
being constructed to support equipment. The interior tile walls are plastered 
on both sides. 
Crane Service 

The generator room is served by a 35-ton, electrically-operated, overhead, 
travelling crane with a 10- ton auxiliary hook. 

The gate house is served by a 7-ton overhead crane with motor-driven hoist 
and hand-operated trolley and bridge. 

Alternating-current motors are used on these cranes. 
Generators 

The installation consists of two vertical-shaft units located on 40-foot centres. 
They were built and installed by the Canadian General Electric Company. The 
machines are normally rated at 4,500-kv-a., 3-phase, 60-cycle, 6,600-volt, 120 
revolutions-per-minute, at 80 per cent, power factor with 40°C ambient air 
temperature, but they are capable of carrying 5,300-kv-a., at 80 per cent, power 
factor continuously with cooling air at an ambient temperature of 15 degrees 
centigrade. The overall diameter of the stator is 20 feet 9 inches and that of the 
rotor over the pole faces 17 feet 9}^ inches. The stator frame is 3 feet 8 inches 



1923 



HYDRO-ELECTRIC POWER COMMISSION 



89 




RANNEY FALLS DEVELOPMENT— CENTRAL ONTARIO AND TRENT SYSTEM 
Generating station progress: Superstructure steel work. January 17, 1922 




RANNEY FALLS DEVELOPMENT— CENTRAL ONTARIO AND TRENT SYSTEM 
Generating station progress: Conduit installation on control-room floor. February 21, 



1922 



90 



FIFTEENTH ANNUAL REPORT OF THE 



No. 49 




1923 



HYDRO-ELECTRIC POWER COMMISSION 



91 




CO 

-J 
_l 
< 

LL 

> 

US 

1 £ 

<•! 

I g 

CO 4- 

>■ o 

:? E 

I- m 
^ «- 

us S 1 

k5 



92 FIFTEENTH ANNUAL REPORT OF THE No. 49 

high and the overall height. of the machine above the main floor level to the top 
of exciter is 13 feet 11 inches. The shaft extends 5 feet below floor level where it 
is bolted through a flanged coupling to the turbine shaft. The rotor is so de- 
signed that no fan blades are required to force cooling air (30,000 cu. ft. per min.) 
through the stator laminations and windings. After passing through the genera- 
tor this air will be re-circulated during winter time for heating the station. In 
summer, air will be taken directly from outside the station and exhausted into 
the generator room and passed out through the monitor on the generator-room 
roof as well as through the generator-room windows. 

The rotor is made of cast steel all cast in one piece and has a suitable rim 
for the application of brake shoes. It was subjected to overspeed tests before 
shipment from the factory. 

The stator frame is of cast iron in two sections and the upper bearing bracket 
is also made in two sections but of cast steel. Special leveling and adjusting 
screws were put in the base and lower bracket and similar ones were placed in 
the arms of the upper bracket for raising and lowering the complete rotor and 
runner and are also used when dismantling the thrust bearing. The armature 
coils have mica tape insulation. 

The thrust bearing supplied with each generator is the standard General 
Electric spring type. It is capable of carrying a load of 190,000 pounds which 
takes care of the weight of rotor and total downward thrust due to turbine. It 
is equipped with an overflow and oil will be circulated to it from the oiling system 
installed in the station. A sight flow indicator is placed in the oil supply pipe. 
These bearings are also equipped with water-cooling coils to remove the heat 
from the oil, and a Bristol recording thermometer is mounted on each generator 
stator frame to record the bearing temperatures. 

These units are each equipped with an upper and lower guide bearing. 
Independent pipes with sight flow indicators control the oil feed and overflows 
from these bearings. 

Special fire fighting apparatus has been provided on each machine consisting 
of pipe rings located around the top and bottom end connections of the stator 
windings provided with small nozzles, placed approximately every 15 inches. 
These nozzles are set at an angle such that when they come into action the end 
connections are covered with a spray of water. The control of the water to 
these pipes is located in the switchboard room and the operator has first to make 
a flexible hose connection and then turn on the valve. 

The units are also equipped with air brakes supported on the lower bracket 
arm. Controls for these are in duplicate, one located beside the governors on 
the main floor and the other in the switchboard room. An electric alarm is 
provided to give warning in the event of the air pressure being low. 

The generators are star connected. The neutral and main leads are carried 
through fibre conduit to a point approximately 15 feet from the generator, where 
the main leads are bussed, and the neutral leads are run through current trans- 
formers and bussed. Two parallel, varnished-cambric, lead-covered cables 
carry the power from this point to the bus in the switch structure. There is a 
disconnecting switch placed at this point so that the neutral of either machine 
may be dead grounded to the station ground bus. 

Differential protection has been provided consisting of three single-pole, 1/2- 
\y% ampere relays (induction type) which in case of trouble in the generator or 
its main cables, will open the generator main breaker or the emergency-bus feeder- 
switch if it is being used as a generator breaker, and both the field switches, one 
from the direct-connected exciter and the other from the motor-driven exciter. 



923 



HYDRO-ELECTRIC POWER COMMISSION 



93 




RANNEY FALLS DEVELOPMENT— CENTRAL ONTARIO AND TRENT SYSTEM 
Generating station progress: Setting first half of No. 2 generator stator. April 4, 1922 




RANNEY FALLS DEVELOPMENT— CENTRAL ONTARIO AND TRENT SYSTEM 
Generating station progress: No. 1 generator spider wound for heating electrically prior 
to shrinking on shaft. July 1, 1922 



94 FIFTEENTH ANNUAL REPORT OF THE No. 49 

The overvoltage protection functions in a similar manner to the differential, 
tripping out the same breakers. Overload protection has also been installed to 
give warning by ringing, a gong in case of an overload on the unit. A fourth 
ammeter has been installed and is connected in the neutral of the current trans- 
formers where it will indicate when the circuit is grounded and the extent of the 
ground. 

The output of each generator is indicated by an indicating wattmeter and 
reactive, volt-ampere meter (2,500-0-7,500 scale) and is integrated on a watthour 
meter. The output of the two units is totalized on recording wattmeters and 
reactive, volt-ampere meters. 

Twelve thermocouples were distributed throughout the stator winding for 
taking the internal temperatures. A number of these are located on the iron 
and others in various places along the slot between the coils. 

The complete generator was assembled and tested in the shop. 
Excitation 

Each 4,500-kv-a. generator is equipped with a 50-kw., 125-volt, shunt-wound, 
direct-connected exciter, the armature being carried on a short shaft which is 
bolted to the top of the generator shaft. A spare 50-kw., shunt- wound, com- 
mutating-pole, 75-horsepower, motor-generator, exciter set has been provided 
and can be used for either of the units. There is capacity in each exciter for the 
excitation of one generator only, and they are suitable for parallel operation, and 
for use with automatic voltage-regulators. The field breakers for the generators 
are located on the main floor and the exciter and field leads were made just as 
short as it was possible and are lead-covered, single-conductor cables. Two field 
breakers are provided for each generator, one controlling the excitation from the 
direct-connected exciter and one from the spare motor-generator exciter. 

The only rheostats used are placed in the exciter fields. These are located 
directly below the field switches and are solenoid operated. 
Transformers 

The main step-up transformers consist of two 6,600/44,000-volt, 3-phase, 
4,500-kv-a., 60-cycle, core-type water-cooled units which were built by the 
Canadian General Electric Company and installed by the Construction depart- 
ment. They are connected delta on the low voltage (6,600-volt) and star on the 
high voltage (44,000 volts). Taps are provided so that voltages of 42,000, 
46,000 and 48,000 may be obtained and the neutral of the high-voltage winding 
has been brought out through the cover. They are equipped with oil expansion 
tanks which are mounted on the main tank. Current-transformers are located 
inside the delta to provide for differential protection, the secondary leads of 
which have been brought out through the cover in separate bushings. The 
cooling coils are self draining. An oil tank with capacity sufficient to take the 
oil of one unit has been installed in the basement and is piped to the transformers. 

These units are rated at 40 degrees Centigrade rise and have a 125 per 
cent, continuous full load rating at a 55 degrees Centigrade rise. The tanks are 
boiler plate and are oval shape. Each unit is equipped with an electric-alarm 
thermometer, sight-flow water-indicator, oil gauge glasses on both the main and 
expansion tank and an oil sampling valve. 

The transformers are located on the generator floor, a transfer truck having 
been provided so that these units can be readily placed under the generator room 
crane. They weigh approximately 17 tons each. The high-voltage side of the 
transformers connect direct to the bus through disconnecting switches. 

The differential protection for these units requires only the current trans- 
formers, noted above, that have been placed inside the delta and one single-pole, 



1923 



HYDRO-ELECTRIC POWER COMMISSION 



95 




RANNEY FALLS DEVELOPMENT— CENTRAL ONTARIO AND TRENT SYSTEM 
Generating station equipment: Control-room switchboard. July 1, 1922 




RANNEY FALLS DEVELOPMENT— CENTRAL ONTARIO AND TRENT SYSTEM 
Generating station equipment: Generators from south end of room. June 30, 1922 



96 



FIFTEENTH ANNUAL REPORT OF THE 



No. 49 




RANNEY FALLS DEVELOPMENT— CENTRAL ONTARIO AND TRENT SYSTEM 
Generating station equipment: Low-voltage (6,600 volts) disconnecting-switches. June 30, 1922 




RANNEY FALLS DEVELOPMENT— CENTRAL ONTARIO AND TRENT SYSTEM 
Generating station equipment: High-voltage (44,000 volts) lightning-arrester equipment. June 30, 1922 



1923 



HYDRO-ELECTRIC POWER COMMISSION 



97 




WX 




.ii'c 
I. 

£3 

C 3 
LU ■- a) 

1_ 3+J 

Mi 
"It 

h- •£ en 

z JS.5 

Ui wc 
DC ra+i 
^.5-ra 



O q 




4 H c. 



98 FIFTEENTH ANNUAL REPORT OF THE No. 49 

1/2- to 13/2-ampere, induction-type relay. The current transformers and relay 
are so connected that unbalanced current only will flow through the relay. A 
push button is provided in the tripping circuit through this relay so that when 
exciting these power transformers the breakers affected can be made non-auto- 
matic. When the differential relay functions the low-voltage breaker or the 
emergency-bus feed-breaker if in use and the high-voltage bus-tie and line- 
breaker to that section of the high-voltage bus operate automatically. Overload 
protection consisting of three single-pole, 4- to 16-ampere, induction-type relays 
has also been provided. 

Switchboard 

All the switchboard apparatus has been mounted on vertical panels. The 
framework for the board was designed so that all the vertical wiring would be 
enclosed in the upright supports thus affording considerable fire protection to 
this wiring. The control, synchronizing and voltage buses are located at the 
top brace thus leaving all the rear of the panel free for mounting equipment. 
The signal lamps are supplied from a separate bus, the voltage of which is con- 
trolled by a rheostat. Multi-contact relays have been installed to permit of 
the selective operation of the breakers which are controlled by differential and 
over voltage relays. 

The temperature equipment which has been installed for each generator is 
mounted on panels located at one end of the switchboard. It consists of a 
potentiometer-type indicator, a 6-point recorder which has its automatic, cold- 
junction compensator self-contained, a twelve-point push-button switch and 
bus-bar board for each unit. 

Oil Breakers and Structures 

The low voltage, oil switch and bus structure were built of reinforced con- 
crete. The main walls and barrier were poured and the 2-inch barrier were all 
pre-cast and assembled after the main structure was set. Inserts were placed 
in the poured portion for mounting all the equipment. Doors are provided up 
to a height of six feet. These have panels of asbestos except where they are in 
front of disconnecting-switches. 

All the breakers are of the solenoid operated type. They all have their 
closing-coil circuits interlocked with a synchronizing plug except the station 
service and those on the high-voltage lines. The tripping-coil circuit is con- 
nected so that it may be supervised by the indications of the signal lamp, which 
should be lighted when the breaker is closed. 

Cutout switches are mounted on the operating mechanism which permits 
the operator to make the switch inoperative when it is being inspected. 

The low- voltage breakers have a rupturing capacity of 325,000-kv-a. The 
emergency-bus feeder-switch can be used to replace any of the other switches. 
Provision has been made to install low-voltage feeders if they are ever required in 
the future. The high-voltage switches have a rupturing capacity of 225 ,000-kv-a. 
The bus-tie switch is non-automatic and will ultimately form a tie between the 
two Central Ontario system trunk lines from Campbellford to Stirling and from 
Healey Falls to Trenton. Its chief function will be that of a sectionalizing 
switch. Provision has been made for two outgoing, high-tension circuits, but 
only the one supplying power to the Healey Falls-Trenton line has been con- 
nected up. The line relay protection consists of three single-pole, unidirectional 
relays which function when excess power flows out from the station, and one 
ground relay which has its tripping contacts connected in series with the watt- 
meter elements on the unidirectional relays to provide selective action. 



1923 



HYDRO-ELECTRIC POWER COMMISSION 



99 






Station Service 

The station service bank of transformers is supplied with power directly 
from the main 6,600-volt bus. It consists of three 50-kv-a., 1-phase, 60-cycle, 
pole-type, 6,600/550-volt units. The low voltage is taken to the service switch- 
board located alongside the main switchboard. Safety-type, quick-make-and- 
break switches were used, all the leads to and from these switches were placed 
entirely in conduit. These switches control the power supplied for the crane, 
the oil and water pumps, the air compressor, heating, lighting, etc. 




RANNEY FALLS DEVELOPMENT— CENTRAL ONTARIO AND TRENT SYSTEM 
Generating station equipment: Low-voltage (6,600 volts) disconnecting-switches and structures. 

June 30, 1922 



00 



FIFTEENTH ANNUAL REPORT OF THE 



No. 49 



The lighting is supplied from two 10-kv-a. transformers. The illumination 
for all parts of the station is controlled from one central lighting cabinet located 
on the switchboard-room floor quite accessible to the operator. In case of 
emergency a certain number of the lamps in the different rooms can be readily 
connected to the battery by means of a double-throw knife-switch located near 
the operator's desk. Electric heating at 550 volts has been provided only in the 
switchboard room. 

Screened wall openings have been located where required to permit the warm 
air from the generator to circulate. It is the intention in severe weather to draw 
all the cooling air for the generators from the main generating room closing off 
entirely the supply direct from the outside. Provision has been made in the 
ventilating duct by means of registers to ventilate and heat the basement and 
the pit between the units by drawing air from the generator room. 

Forced ventilation by means of a small electric fan has been provided for 
the switchboard room and lavatory. This equipment has been so arranged that 
air can be drawn from the generator room or direct from the outside of the north 
end of the building, thus providing either heating or cooling. 
Accommodation 

A lavatory including shower bath and locker space is provided on the first 
gallery for the accommodation of the operators. 

Lubricating Oil System 

The generator-bearing lubrication scheme is of the continuous filtering type. 
The oil after coming from the bearings passes through a canton flannel bag 
filter before again returning to the bearings. 

The filter provides space enough in its good oil chamber to contain all the oil 
in the system. This feature prevents spillovers in case the system shuts down. 
Provision is made so that one half of the filter may be Closed down while cleaning, 
without interrupting the oil supply to the generators. Separate supply pipes 
control the feed to each of the bearings and these have been equipped with sight- 
flow indicators. 




RANNEY FALLS DEVELOPMENT— CENTRAL ONTARIO AND TRENT SYSTEM 
Generating station equipment: Low-voltage (6,600 volts) bus-structure. July 1, 1922 



1923 HYDRO-ELECTRIC POWER COMMISSION 101 

An overflow tank, containing enough oil to supply the generators for about 
an hour, is mounted on the roof trusses and would continue to supply oil by 
gravity to the bearings providing the pumps fail to operate. 

The system is provided with an electric alarm to warn the operator in case 
the oil supply becomes low. . 

Duplicate oil pumps located in the basement, with a capacity of 19 Imperial 
gallons per minute each, supply oil to the system. 

Compressed Air Supply 

An air receiver for operating the air brakes for bringing the generator rotor 
to rest is kept charged by means of a small compressor with a capacity of 17 
cubic feet of free air per minute installed in the basement of the station. The 
brakes are controlled by a valve at the generator as well as in the control room. 
Air for cleaning equipment and for small automatic tools may be obtained from 
this source. 
Cooling Water Supply 

As the normal head of the water in the forebay was insufficient as a supply 
for all purposes, duplicate pumps were installed in the basement, the water being 
taken from the scroll cases. The pumps are rated at 100 Imperial gallons per 
minute at 150-feet head and supply cooling water for the thrust bearings of the 
generators, for the transformer and the protection of the generators in case of 
fire inside a machine. 

A sight-flow indicator has been installed on the supply to the thrust bearing 
and in the overflow from the transformers. 
Grounding 

No. 4/0 bare copper wire for grounding has been run throughout the whole 
station, embedded as a rule under the floor finish and all the structural steel and 
the frames of the machines and other equipment have been connected to it. The 
various ground wire loops are brought to one central test link box and independent 
leads are taken from this point to the turbine cases and out through the walls of 
the station at the north and south. From here they will be carried to a suitable 
location for a ground plate. A separate ground has been provided for the 
high-voltage arresters. 
Battery 

A 120-ampere-hour, 60-cell battery has been installed to provide power for 
the electric operation of all the breakers and for emergency lighting. The 
charging, motor-generator set for the battery (5 kilowatt 7 y% horsepower) was 
installed on the main generator-room floor and the control panel was located on 
one end of the main switchboard. 

SEYMOUR GENERATING STATION 

Barriers were installed between the bus-tie, disconnecting-switches on the 
2,200-volt bus in Seymour generating station. This work was completed in 
January, 1922. 

As the customers on the Hoards line (6,600 volt) were recently put on the 
standard rural basis, it Was necessary to install meters to get the total demand. 
Accordingly an "RA" demand-meter was installed and placed in service during 
November, 1921. 

In order that the amount of power supplied from the town plant at Camp- 
bellford might be checked, meters were installed on the tie line at Seymour 
generating station. This work was completed and placed in service during 
December, 1921. 

Adequate relay protection was installed on the tie line between the town 



102 FIFTEENTH ANNUAL REPORT OF THE No. 49 

plant and Campbellford and Seymour generating station, the work being com- 
pleted during November, 1921. 

SIDNEY GENERATING STATION 

Adequate fire protection equipment was installed during January, 1922, for 
the protection of the cottages at this generating station. The experimental 
brake installed for one of the generators in this station has proven satisfactory. 
It is intended to install brakes on the other units during 1923. 

SIDNEY TERMINAL STATION 

A new system of relays with instrument transformers of suitable capacity 
was installed during September, 1922. Unidirectional relays were installed in 
the loop lines to Healey Falls generating station and Belleville terminal station, 
and inverse, definite-time, overload relays in the line to Port Hope. Inverse, 
definite-time, overload relays were also installed in conjunction with the uni- 
directional relays and overload relays for ground protection. Nine current- 
transformers of 300-150/5-ampere ratio were purchased and replaced the 80- to 
5-ampere bushing-type current-transformers on the lines. 

As it is customary to operate this system at times in two sections with 
Sidney terminal station in the southern section and Healey Falls in the northern 
section it was decided to arrange the neutrals of the transformer banks in Sidney 
station to provide for efficient means of grounding at this point with the least 
possible delay. Healey Falls is grounded at all times w^th the system operating 
as one unit and this is sufficient until such time as it is necessary to operate the 
system in two sections. 

Special bushings were purchased for bringing out the neutral lead from the 
terminal board in the transformer. Disconnecting switches were installed in 
this lead to cut the neutral clear of ground when not required. This work was 
completed in October, 1922. 

NIPISSING SYSTEM 

BINGHAM CHUTE GENERATING STATION 

Power requirements of the Nipissing system in the past year have neces- 
sitated the development of an additional source of power. In July, 1922, it was 
decided to proceed with the development of the Bingham Chute power site with 
a view to having power available for the Nipissing system early in 1923. Three 
300-kv-a. transformers and one 450-kw. generator are available for this station 
from the Nipissing generating station. This equipment was removed at the 
time of the installation of the 1,400-kv-a. generator and the bank of three 900- 
kv-a. transformers in that plant. 

One generator will be installed, and when this unit is in operation it is the 
intention to dismantle the second 450-kw. generator at Nipissing and install it 
at the Bingham Chute plant. 

Nipissing Ranger Shanties 

Instructions were received in October, 1921, covering the erection of two 
ranger shanties, one at Surprise Lake, the other at Clear Lake storage dams. 
These shanties were erected by the Operating department and were completed 
on March 23, 1922. 

NORTH BAY GENERATING STATION 

A 150-kv-a., alternating-current generator damaged in the North Bay 
generating station and repaired by the Canadian Westinghouse Company was 
subjected to inspection and test prior to being returned to North Bay. 



1923 HYDRO-ELECTRIC POWER COMMISSION 103 



TABLE 

OF 

TRANSFORMING STATION DETAILS 

AS OF 

» 

OCTOBER 31, 1922 



104 



FIFTEENTH ANNUAL REPORT OF THE 



No. 49 



TABLE OF TRANSFORMING STATION 

The particulars given in this table refer to all transforming stations owned or operated by the 
Hydro-Electric Power Commission of Ontario on October 31, 1922. 

Under the columns headed "Circuits" are given the complete number and voltage of circuits 
of all kinds which enter or leave a station except certain feeders that are not the property of the 
system. 

Under "active" transformers are given all transformers actually in operation and in reserve 
except service transformers. 



Station 


Circuits 


System 
number 


Name 


Date 

placed 

in 

operation 


Type 
of building 


High 
voltage 


Low 
voltage 




Volts 


No. 


Volts 


No. 



NIAGARA 



N 1 
N 1 
N 1 
N 2 
N 237 

N 239 
N 234 

N 235 
N 3 
N 4 

N 442 
N 432 
N 439 
N 443 
N 440 

N 5 
N 537 
N 538 
N 533 
N 534 

N 539 
N 536 
N 6 

N6D31 

N 7 



735 
734 
737 
733 
8 



N 834 
N 841 
N 839 
N 838 
N 840 

N 832 
N 9 
N 932 

N 10 
N1034 



Niagara 



Dundas trans, sta. . 
Caledonia dist. sta. 



Hagersville dist. sta. 
Lynden dist. sta. . . . 
Waterdown dist. sta. 
Toronto trans, sta. 
London trans, sta. . . 



Ailsa Craig dist. sta. 
Delaware dist. sta. . . 
Dorchester dist. sta. 

Exeter dist. sta 

Lucan dist. sta 



Guelph trans, sta 

Acton dist. sta 

Cheltenham dist. sta. 

Elora dist. sta 

Fergus dist. sta 



Georgetown dist. sta. 
Rockwood dist. sta.. 
Preston trans, sta. . . . 



South Waterloo. . . . 
Kitchener trans, sta. 



Baden dist. sta 

Elmira dist. sta 

New Hamburg dist. sta. 

St. Jacobs dist. sta 

Stratford trans, sta 



Dublin dist. sta 

Harriston dist. sta. . 

Listowel dist. sta 

Milverton dist. sta. . 
Palmerston dist. sta. 



Tavistock dist. sta 

St. Marys trans, sta 

St. Marys Cement Co. dist. 

sta 

Woodstock trans, sta 

Beachville dist. sta 



Aug. 1910 
Aug. 1914 
Aug. 1914 
Sept. 1910 
Sept. 1912 

Aug. 1913 
Sept. 1915 
Apr. 1915 
Feb. 1911 
Nov. 1910 

Jan. 1916 
Mar. 1915 
Dec. 1914 
May 1916 
Feb. 1915 

Sept. 1910 
Dec. 1912 
July, 1914 
Nov. 1914 
Nov. 1914 

Aug. 1913 
Aug. 1913 
Sept. 1910 

Mar. 1919 
Sept. 1910 

May 1912 
Oct. 1913 
Feb. 1911 
Sept. 1917 
Nov. 1911 

Oct. 1917 
June 1916 
May 1916 
May 1916 
June 1916 

Oct. 1916 
Apr. 1911 
Sept. 1912 

Nov. 1911 
July 1912 



T.S. brick 
T.S. brick 
T.S. brick 
T.S. brick 

C. brick 

D. brick 

E. brick 
customer 
T.S. brick 
T.S. brick 

E. brick 
E. brick 
E. brick 

D. brick 

E. brick 

T.S. brick 
B. brick 

D. brick 

E. brick 
E. brick 

D. brick 
P. outdoor 
T.S. brick 

in Preston T.S. 
T.S. brick 

special 
D. brick 
special 
P. outdoor 
T.S. 

P. outdoor 
H. brick 
special 
H. brick 
H. brick 

special 
T.S. brick 
special 

T.S. brick 
D.L. brick. 



110,000 4 



46,000 

110,000 

13,200 

13,200 

13,200 

13,200 

110,000 

110,000 

13,200 
13,200 
13,200 
13,200 
13,200 

110,000 
13,200 
13,200 
13,200 
13,200 

13,200 

13,200 

110,000 

13,200 
110,000 

13,200 
13,200 
13,200 
13,200 
110,000 

26,400 
26,400 
26,400 
26,400 
26,400 

26,400 

110,000 

13,200 

110,000 
13.200 



12,000 12 



13,200 
2,300 

2,300 

4,000 

2,300 

13,200 

13,200 

4,000 
4,000 
4,000 
4,000 
4,000 

13,200 

2,300 

575 

4,000 

2,300 

4,000 

2,300 

13,200 

4,000 
13,200 

4,000 

4,000 

2,300 

575 

26,400 

4,000 
4,000 
4,000 
4,000 
4,000 

575 

13,200 

575 

550 

13,200 

2,300 



8 
2 

2 
2 

3l' 

7 

2 
3 
3 
4 
2 

5 
2 
1 
1 
1 

2 
1 
6 

1 

7 

2 
1 

2e 
1 

5 

1 

1 
1 
1 
3i 

1 
2 
1 
1 
6 
2 



Note. — For subnotes a, b, c, etc., see end of table. 



1923 



HYDRO-ELECTRIC POWER COMMISSION 



105 



DETAILS AS OF OCTOBER 31, 1922 

Transformers designated as "spare" are extra units at the station ready for emergency use, 
whereas those referred to as "reserve" are available for use in stations where and when increased 
capacity is required. 

The total kv-a. of all transformers is 1,082,730 kv-a. made up of 876,960 kv-a. in operation, 
63,150 kv-a. in reserve and 142,620 kv-a. spare. 

There are 884,685 kv-a. of 25-cycle transformers and 198,045 kv-a. of 60 cycle units, making 
together the total of 1,082,730. 



Transformers 



Active 




Spare 




No. 

of 


No. 

of 
units 


Make 

of 
units 


Unit 
kv-a. 


Phase 
rating 

of 
unit 


Total 
kv-a. 


Banks 
connected 


Single phase except 

where otherwise 

stated 


banks 


H.V. 


L.V. 


No. 


Make 


Unit 
kv-a. 



SYSTEM— 25 Cycles 



C.W. Co. 


3,500 




52,500 


Y 


C.W. Co. 


7,500 




90,000 


Y 


C.G.E. Co. 


3,500 




31,500 


Y 


C.G.E. Co. 


2,500 




15,000 


Y 


P.T. Co. 


150 




450 


A 


C.C.W.Co. 


150 




450 


A 


C.W. Co. 


75 




225 


A 


C.C.W. Co. 


75 




225 


A 


C.G.E. Co. 


5,000 




75,000 


Y 


C.G.E. Co. 


5,000 




15,000 


Y 


C.G.E. Co. 


2,500 




7,500 


Y 


C.W. Co. 


75 




225 


A 


P.E. Co. 


25 




75 


A 


C.W. Co. 


75 




225 


A 


C.G.E. Co. 


100 




300 


A 


C.G.E. Co. 


75 




225 


A 


C.G.E. Co. 


2,500 




7,500 


Y 


C.W. Co. 


75 




225 


A 


C.G.E. Co. 


75 




225 


A 


C.W. Co. 


75 




225 


A 


C.G.E. Co. 


75 




225 


A 


C.G.E. Co. 


150 




450 


A 


C.G.E. Co. 


25 




75 


A 


G.E. 


1,250 




3,750 


Y 


G.E. 


750 




2,250 


Y 


C.G.E. Co. 


20 




60 


A 


C.G.E. Co. 


1,250 




3,750 


Y 


C.G.E. Co. 


2,500 




7,500 


Y 


C.C.W. Co. 


150 




450 


A 


C.G.E. Co. 


150 




450 


A 


P.E. Co. 


75 




225 


A 


M.E. Co. 


75 




75 


A 


C.W. Co. 


1,250 




3,750 


Y 


M.E. Co. 


50 




50 


A 


C.G.E. Co. 


75 




225 


A 


C.G.E. Co. 


200 




600 


A 


C.G.E. Co. 


150 




450 


A 


C.G.E. Co, 


75 




225 


A 


C.C.W. Co. 


75 




225 


A 


G.E. Co. 


750 




2,250 


Y 


C.G.E. Co. 


500 




1,500 


A 


P.E. Co. 


150 




450 


A 


C.G.E. Co. 


1,250 




3,750 


Y 


C.G.E. Co. 


75 




225 


A 



A 
A 
A 
A 
A 

Y 
Y 

A 
A 
A 
A 
Y 
Y 
Y 
Y 
Y 

A 
A 
A 
Y 

A 

Y 

A 
A 
A 
Y 
A 
A 
Y 
Y 
A 
A 
A 

Y 
Y 
Y 
Y 
Y 

A 
A 
A 
A 
A 
A 



C.W. Co. 



C.G.E. Co. 
C.G.E. Co, 



C.W. Co. 



C.G.E. Co. 
C.G.E. Co. 



C.G.E. Co. 



G.E. Co. 



C.G.E. Co 



C.W. Co. 



C.G.E. Co. 



G.E. Co. 
G.E. Co.' 



3,500 



3,500 
2,500 



75 



5,000 
5,000 



1,250 



750 



2,500 



1,250 



75 



750 
750 



106 



FIFTEENTH ANNUAL REPORT OF THE 



No. 49 



TABLE OF TRANSFORMING STATION 



Station 


Circuits 


System 
number 


Name 


Date 

placed 

in 

operation 


Type 
of building 


High 
voltage 


Low 
voltage 




Volts 


No. 


Volts 


No. 



NIAGARA 



N1033 
N1036 
N 11 
N1133 
N1138 

N1134 
N1135 
N1137 
N 12 
N1240 

N1234 
N1241 
N1233 
N1235 

N 13 

N1331 
N1339 

N 14 

N1434 

N1438 

N1442 
N1440 
N1445 
N1441 

N1443 

N1435 
N1437 
N1432 
N1439 

N1446 

N 15 

J 2 
J 1 

N1533 
J 6 

J 7 
J 3 
J 4 
J 20 
J98-1 



N 16 
N1632 
N1634 
N1631 

N 17 



Embro dist. sta 

Norwich dist. sta 

St. Thomas trans, sta. . . . 
London & Pt. Stanley Ry. 
Aylmer dist. sta 



Dutton dist. sta 

West Lome dist. sta. . 
Port Stanley dist. sta. 

Brant trans, sta 

Ayr dist. sta 



Burford dist. sta.. . . 
Drumbo dist. sta. . . . 
St. George dist. sta. . 
Waterford dist. sta.. 
Cooksville trans, sta. 

Port Credit dist. sta. 
Streetsville dist. sta. 
Kent trans, sta 



Blenheim dist. sta. 
Bothwell dist. sta. 



Brigden dist. sta.. . . 
Dresden dist. sta.. . . 

Forest dist. sta 

Oil Springs dist. sta. 



Petrolia dist. sta. 



Ridgetown dist. sta. . 
Thamesville dist. sta 

Tilbury dist. sta 

Wallaceburg dist. sta. 

Watford dist. sta. . . . 



Essex trans, sta. 



Amherstburg dist. sta. 
Canard River dist. sta. 

Can. Salt Co. dist. sta. 
Cottam dist. sta 



Essex dist. sta 

Harrow dist. sta 

Kingsville dist. sta 

Leamington dist. sta 

Essex County System re- 
serve equipment. . . . 



York trans, sta 

Mimico dist. sta 

Woodbridge dist. sta. 
Etobicoke dist. sta.. . 



Hamilton trans, sta 



Dec. 1914 
Mar. 1912 
Feb. 1912 
June 1915 
Feb. 1915 

Aug. 1915 
Dec. 1916 
Mar. 1912 
Jan. 1914 
Dec. 1914 

May 1915 
Dec. 1914 
Sept. 1915 
May 1915 
Nov. 1911 

Aug. 1912 
Nov. 1913 
Aug. 1914 

Oct. 1915 
Aug. 1915 

Dec. 1917 
Mar. 1915 
Feb. 1917 
Dec. 1917 

Apr. 1916 



Dec. 
Oct. 

Apr. 
Feb. 

Sept. 

Aug. 

Feb. 
Jan. 

Nov. 
Oct. 

Oct. 
Jan. 
Jan. 
Aug. 



1915 
1915 
1915 
1915 

1917 

1914 

1919 
1914 

1917 
1915 

1914 
1914 
1914 
1915 



Oct. 1919 
May 1912 
Dec. 1914 
Sept. 1918 



Oct. 1922 



E. brick 
special 
T.S. brick 
In T.S. 
special 

E. brick 
E. brick 
B. brick 
T.S. brick 
H. brick 

H. brick 
H. brick 
In Brant T.S. 
H. brick 
T.S. brick 

B. brick 
D. brick 
T.S. brick 

H. brick 
H. brick 

P. outdoor 
H. brick 
H. brick 
P. outdoor 

G. brick 

H. brick 
H. brick 
G. brick 
G. brick 

P. outdoor 

T.S. brick 

special 
P. outdoor 

special 
P. outdoor 

P. outdoor 
P. outdoor 
special 
special 



temp. sh. iron 
C. brick 
E. brick 
special 

outdoor 



13,200 


1 


4,000 


13,200 


1 


2,300 


110,000 


•4 


13,200 


13,200 


3 


920 


13,200 


1 


4,000 


13,200 


1 


4,000 


13,200 


1 


4,000 


13,200 


1 


2,300 


110,000 


4 


26,400 


26,400 


1 


4,000 


26,400 


1 


4,000 


26,400 


1 


4,000 


4,000 


1 


2,300 


26,400 


1 


4,000 


110,000 


3 


13,200 


13,200 


1 


2,300 


13,200 


2 


2,300 


110,000 


4 


26,400 


26,400 


1 


4,000 


26,400 


1 


4,000 


26,400 


1 


575 


26,400 


1 


4,000 


26,400 


1 


4,000 


26,400 


1 


4,000 


26,400 


2 


4,000 


26,400 


1 


4,000 


26,400 


1 


4,000 


26,400 


1 


4,000 


26,400 


1 


4,000 


26,400 


2 


4,000 


110,000 


2 


26,400 


26,400 


2 


4,000 


26,400 


1 


(115 
\230 






26,400 


2 


176 


26,400 


1 


/US 

\230 






26,400 


1 


2,300 


26,400 


1 


2,300 


26,400 


2 


4,000 


26,400 


1 


4,000 


110,000 


1 


13,200 


13,200 


1 


4,000 


13,200 


1 


4,000 


13,200 


2 


/ 2,300 
\ 4,000 






110,000 


2 


13,200 



Note. — For subnotes a, b, c, etc., see end of table 



1923 



HYDRO-ELECTRIC POWER COMMISSION 



107 



DETAILS AS OF OCTOBER 31, 1922— Continued 



Transformers 



Active 




Spare 




No. 
of 


No. 

of 

units 


Make 

of 
units 


Unit 
kv-a. 


Phase 
rating 

of 
unit 


Total 
kv-a. 


Banks 
connected 


Single phase except 

where otherwise 

stated 


banks 


H.V. 


L.V. 


No. 


Make 


Unit 
kv-a. 



SYSTEM— 25 


Cycles — Continued 
















1 
3 
6 
9 
3 

3 
3 
3 
3 
3 

1 
3 
3 
3 
3 

3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 

1 

3 
3 
1 
1 
3 

3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
1 

3 
3 
3 
1 

6 
1 

1 
1 
3 
3 

1 

3 
3 
3 

2 
1 
3 


P.E. Co. 
P.E. Co. 
G.E. Co. 
C.W. Co. 
C.G.E. Co. 

C.W. Co. 
C.W. Co. 
C.G.E. Co. 
C.W. Co. 
C.G.E. Co. 

M.E. Co. 
C.G.E. Co. 
C.C.W. Co. 
C.W. Co. 
G.E. Co. 

C.G.E. Co. 
C.G.E. Co. 
C.W. Co. 
C.G.E. Co. 
C.W. Co. 
C.W. Co. 

M.E. Co. 
C.W. Co. 
C.C.W. Co. 
M.E. Co. 
C.W. Co. 
P.E. Co. 

C.W. Co. 
C.W. Co. 
C.G.E. Co. 
C.G.E. Co. 
P.E. Co. 
M.E. Co.. 

C.W. Co. 
C.G.E. Co. 
P.E. Co. 
M.E. Co. 

M.E. Co. 
M.E. Co. 

P.E. Co. 
M.E. Co. 
C.W. Co. 
C.C.W. Co. 

M.E. Co. 

G.E. Co. 
C.C.W. Co. 
C.G.E. Co. 
C.C.W. Co. 
C.W. Co. 
C.W. Co. 


50 

75 

750 

185 

50 

75 

75 

100 

2,500 

75 

75 
75 
50 
75 
1,250 

75 

75 

1,250 

2,500 

75 
75 

75 
75 
75 
75 
150 
300 

75 
75 
100 
150 
150 
150 

2,500 

5,000 

100 

25 

750 
25 

150 

75 
75 
75 

75 

1,250 
150 
75 
1,500 
1,500 
5,000 


3 

3 

3 

1 
1 
1 
3 
3 
1 


50 

225 

4,500 

1,665 

150 

225 

225 

300 

7,500 

225 

75 

225 

150 

225 

3,750 

225 
225 
3,750 
7,500 
225 
225 

75 
225 
225 

75 
150 
900 

225 
225 
300 
450 
450 
150 

7,500 

15,000 

300 

25 

4,500 

25 

150 

75 

225 

225 

75 

3,750 

450 

225 

3,000 

1,500 

15,000 


A 
A 
Y 

A 
A 

A 
A 
A 
Y 

A 

A 
A 
Y 
A 
Y 

A 
A 
Y 
Y 

A 
A 

A 
A 
A 
A 
A 
A 

A 
A 
A 
A 
A 
A . 

Y 
Y 

A 


Y 

A 
A 
A 
Y 

Y 
Y 

A 
A 
Y 

Y 
Y 

A 
Y 

A 

A 
A 
A 
A 
Y 
Y 

A 
Y 
A 
Y 
Y 
Y 

Y 
Y 
Y 
Y 
Y 
Y 

A 
A 
Y 


















1 


G.E. Co. 


750 




































1 


C.W. Co. 


2,500 




































1 


G.E. Co. 


1,250 










{1 


1 


C.G.E. Co. 


2,500 








































{; 














3 


C.G.E. Co. 


150 








1 










{\ 
























1 


C.G.E. Co. 


5,000 




















A 


6* 






• 












A 
A 
A 
A 

26400m 

13200A 

Y 

A 
A 
Y 
Y 
Y 


A 
A 
Y 
Y 

4000Y 
2300A 

A 
Y 
Y 

A 
Y 

A 








































1 
1 


1 



G.E. Co. 


1,250 


1 








2 

1 


1 


C.C.W. Co. 


1,500 


1 


4 


C.W. Co. 


5,000 



108 



FIFTEENTH ANNUAL REPORT OF THE 



No. 49 



TABLE OF TRANSFORMING STATION 



Station 


Circuits 


System 
number 


Name 


Date 

placed 

in 

operation 


Type 
of building 


High 
voltage 


Low 

voltage 




Volts 


No. 


Volts 


No. 



NIAGARA 



N7D31 

N 20 



Saltfleet dist. sta 
Queenston 



Feb. 1922 
Jan. 1922 



P. outdoor 
concrete special 



13,200 
110,000 



4,000 
12,000 

4,000 



ONTARIO POWER COMPANY 



A 2 
A 3 

NC 701 



O.P. Co. dist. sta 

Port Colborne dist. sta. 



Montrose dist. sta Feb. 1920 



1905 
Sept. 28, 1913 



Brick special 
special 



corrugated iron 
sDecial 



| 60,000 


2 


12,001 


1 30,000 
30,000 


2 
2 




/ 2,300 
\ 12,000 


12,000 


2 


4,000 



11 



NIAGARA 



N98- 
N98- 
N98- 
N98- 


-1 
-2 
-3 
-6 


N98- 


-7 


N98- 


-8 


N98- 


-9 


N98- 


-11 


N98- 


-12 


N98- 


-13 


N98- 


-14 


N98- 


-19 


N98- 


-20 



Niagara System Res. Equip 



« « 



« « 



<< a 



a << 



u « <( 



« a u a 



«. u u 



u a u 



u u 



u a 



« u 



u a 



Note. — For subnotes a, b, c, etc., see end of table. 



1923 



HYDRO-ELECTRIC POWER COMMISSION 



09 



DETAILS AS OF OCTOBER 31, 1922— Continued 



Transformers 



Active 




Spare 




No. 
of 


No. 

of 

units 


Make 
of 

units 


Unit 
kv-a. 


Phase 
rating 

of 
unit 


Total 
kv-a. 


Banks 
connected 


Single phase except 

where otherwise 

stated 


banks 


H.V. 


L.V. 


No. 


Make 


Unit 
kv-a. 



SYSTEM— 25 Cycles— Continued 



1 


1 


M.E. Co. 


400 


4 


12 


C.W. Co. 


15,000 


1 


3 


C.W. Co. 


15,000 


3- 


9 


M.E. Co. 


200 



400 

180,000 

c 45,000 

d 1,800 



spares 



SYSTEM— 25 Cycles 



12 

6 

3 
3 



W.E. & 

M. Co. 
C.W. Co. 
C.G.E. Co. 
C.W. Co. 



C.C.W. Co 
C.G.E. Co. 



3,000 


1 


36,000 


Y 


3,000 


1 


18,000 


Y 


150 


1 


450 


A 


1,500 


1 


4,500 


A 


58,950 


1,500 


3 


1,500 


A 


1,500 


3 


1,500 


A 



none 
none 

3 

2 

1 



P.T. Co. 
P.T. Co. 
C.W. Co. 



C.G.E. Co. 



25 
50 
60 



235 
550 



SYSTEM— Continued 



C.W. Co. 
G.E. Co. 
C.G.E. Co 
M.E. Co. 



P.E. Co. 

M.E. Co. 
C.C.W. Co 

C.G.E. Co. 
C.W. Co. 
C.C.W. Co. 
M.E. Co. 
C.W. Co. 
M.E. Co. 



750 
750 

750 

75 


1 

1 
1 
3 


75 


1 


750 


3 


1,500 


3 


5,000 


1 


5,000 


1 


1,500 


3 


50 


3 


2,500 


1 


50 


3 



3,000 

750 

3,000 

75 



225 

750 
3,000 

35,000 

10,000 

3,000 

50 

2,500 

50 



63500m 
63500m 
63500m 
26400m 



13200A 
26400m 



13200 



m 
26400Y 



13200 



26400 



13200m 

13200m 

13200m 

4000Y 



2300/575 A 
2300m 



575 



4000m 



13200A 
63500m 

63500m 

m 
26400Y 



13200 
26400m 



13200A 
63500m 

26400m 



2300/575 A 

m 
4000Y 



2300 



575A 



26400m 



13200 
26400m 



13200 
4000Ym 



2300A 

4000Ym 
2300/575 A 

26400m 



13200 



13200 
4000m 



2300/5/5 A 



110 



FIFTEENTH ANNUAL REPORT OF THE 



No. 49 



TABLE OF TRANSFORMING STATION 



Station 


Circuits 


System 
number 


Name 


Date 

placed 

in 

operation 


Type 
of building 


High 
voltage 


Low 
voltage 




Volts 


No. 


Volts 


No. 



SEVERN 



S 1 
S 2 
S 4 

S5-10 

S 5 



S 17 



S 34 
S 35 
S 36 



S 37 
S98-2 



Midland dist. sta. 
Penetang dist. sta 
Barrie dist. sta. . . 



Collingwood Electric 

Castings dist. sta. . . 

Collingwood dist. sta. , 



Coldwater dist. sta 

Elmvale dist. sta 

Stayner dist. sta 

Midland (G.T.R. Tiffin) 

dist. sta 

Pt. McNicoll dist. sta. . . 



Waubaushene dist. sta. . 
Victoria Harbor dist. sta. 

Big Chute gen. sta 

C.P.R., Pt. McNicoll. . . 
Camp Borden dist. sta . . 



Alliston, dist. sta. . . 
Beeton dist. sta. . . . 
Tottenham dist . sta 
Cookstown dist. sta . 
Thornton dist. sta. . 



Bradford dist. sta . . 
Reserve equipment 



Aug. 27, 191/ 
Nov. 1911 
Mar. 1913 



May 7, 1922 
1913 

1913 
May 27, 1913 
Sept. 1913 

Sept. 15, 1922 
Feb. 1921 

Nov. 13, 1914 
July 1, 1914 
July 17, 1914 
July 15, 1916 
June 29, 1916 

May 23, 1918 
July 26, 1918 
Sept. 19, 1918 
Apr. 25, 1918 
Oct. 16, 1918 

Sept. 6, 1918 

May 3, 1921 



brick special 
brick special 
brick special 



G. brick 
brick special 

G. brick 
G. brick 
G. brick 

brick special 
P. outdoor 

E. brick 
brick special 
concrete special 
brick special, 
brick special. 

H. brick 
P. outdoor 
P. outdoor 
P. outdoor 
P. outdoor 

H. brick 
modified 



22,000 
22,000 
22,000 


3 
1 
1 


2,300 
2,200 
2,300 


22,000 
22,000 


1 
4 


575 
2,300 


22,000 
22,000 
22,000 


1 
1 
1 


2,300 
2,300 
4,000 


22,000 
2,200 


2 

1 


575 
575 


22,000 
22,000 
22,000 
22,000 
22,000 


1 
1 
3 
2 

1 


2,300 
2,300 
2,200 

575 
2,200 


22,000 
22,000 
22,000 
22,000 
22,000 


1 
1 
1 
1 
1 


4,000 
4,000 
4,000 
4,000 
4,000 


/ 22,000 

\ 575 


1 
1 


575 
4,000 



EUGENIA 



E 1 

E 2 

E 3 

E 4 

E 5 

E 7 
E 8 

E 9 
E10 
E12 

E13 
E15 
E17 
E18 
E21 

E22 
E24 
E25 
E26 
E29 



Eugenia gen. sta 

Owen Sound dist. sta 
Chatsworth dist. sta. 

Chesley dist. sta 

Dundalk dist. sta. . . . 



Durham dist. sta. 
Hanover dist. sta. 



Mt. Forest dist. sta. 
Shelburne dist. sta. . 
Orangeville dist. sta. 



Grand Valley dist. sta. 

Kilsyth dist. sta 

Elmwood dist. sta. . . . 
Priceville dist. sta. . . . 
Teeswater dist. sta . . . 



Wingham dist. sta 

Holyrood dist. sta 

Kincardine dist. sta 

Walkerton Quarry dist. sta. 
Durham, Russell dist. sta.. 



Nov. 18, 1915 
Nov. 18, 1915 
Nov. 18, 1915 
June 18, 1916 
Nov. 18, 1915 

Nov. 18, 1915 
1918 

Nov. 18, 1915 
Sept. 5, 1917 
Feb. 1917 

Aug. 1917 
Jan. 1, 1918 
May 23, 1918 
Mar. 17, 1921 
May, 1921 

April, 1921 
April, 1921 
May, 1921 
Feb. 28, 1921 
May 7, 1922 



brick special 
brick special 
H. brick 
G. brick 
H. brick 

H brick 
G. brick mod- 
ified 
G. brick 
H. brick 
G. brick 

H. brick mod. 
P. outdoor 
P. outdoor 
P. outdoor 
H. brick 

G. brick 

outdoor special 

special brick 

frame 

P. outdoor 



22,000 
22,000 
22,000 
22,000 
22,000 

22,000 
22,000 

22,000 
22,000 
22,000 

22,000 
22,000 
22,000 
22,000 
22,000 

22,000 
22,000 
22,000 
22,000 
22,000 



4,000 
2,300 
4,000 
4,000 
4,000 

4,000 
'4,000 
2,300 
'4,000 
4,000 
4,000 

4,000 
4,000 
4,000 
2,200 
4,000 

2,300 
4,000 
2,200 
2,300 

575 



Note. — For subnotes a, b, c, etc., see end of table. 



1923 



HYDRO-ELECTRIC POWER COMMISSION 



II 



DETAILS AS OF OCTOBER 31, 1922— Continued 



Transformers 



Active 




Spare 




No. 
of 


No. 
of 

units 


Make 

of 
units 


Unit 
kv-a. 


Phase 
rating 

of 
unit 


Total 
kv-a. 


Banks 
connected 


Single phase except 

where otherwise 

stated 


banks 


H.V. 


L.V. 


No. 


Make 


unit 
kv-a. 



SYSTEM— 60 Cycles 



M.E. Co. 
C.C.W. Co. 
P.E. Co. 
C.G.E. Co 

M.E. Co. 
C.G.E. Co 

C.G.E. Co. 
C.W. Co. 
C.W. Co. 

C.G.E. Co. 
P.E. Co. 

C.G.E. Co. 
C.W. Co. 
C.W. Co. 
C.G.E. Co. 
C.W. Co. 

P.E. Co. 
M.E. Co. 
M.E. Co. 
C.G.E. Co. 
M.E. Co. 

C.G.E. Co. 
C.G.E. Co. 
C.G.E. Co. 



300 




900 


ZA 


200 




600 


A 


350 




700 


T 


350 




700 


T 


300 




900 


A 


400 




1,200 


A 


25 




75 


A 


75 




225 


A 


100 




300 


A 


400 




1,200 


A 


15 




45 


A 


25 




50 


V 


100 




100 


1* 


600 




3,600 


A 


500 




1,500 


A 


125 




375 


A 


75 


1 


225 


A 


75 


3 


75 


A 


75 


3 


75 


A 


75 


3 


75 


A 


25 


3 


25 


A 


75 


3 


75 


A 


15 


1 


45 


A 


25 


1 


25 


22,000m 



A 
A 
+ 
+ 

A 
A 

A 
A 
Y 

A 
A 

V 

1* 

A 
A 
A 

Y 
Y 
Y 
Y 
Y 

A 
Y 
2,300/575 



C.W. Co. 



600 



SYSTEM— 60 Cycles 



C.W. Co. 
C.W. Co. 
C.G.E. Co, 
C.G.E. Co. 
C.G.E. Co. 

C.G.E. Co. 
P.E. Co. 
P.E. Co. 
C.G.E. Co. 
M.E. Co. 
G.E. Co. 

C.G.E. Co. 
M.E. Co. 
M.E. Co. 
G.E. Co. 
C.G.E. Co. 

C.G.E. Co. 
C.W. Co. 
C.W. Co. 
M.E. Co. 
M.E. Co. 



900 


1 


5,400 


A 


550 


1 


1,650 


A. 


25 


1 


75 


A 


100 


1 


300 


A 


50 


1 


150 


A 


50 


1 


150 


A 


750 


3 


1,500 


A 


750 


3 


750 


A 


100 


1 


300 


A 


50 


1 


150 


A 


100 


1 


300 


A 


75 


1 


225 


A 


75 


3 


75 


A 


50 


3 


50 


A 


10 


1 


20 


V 


50 


1 


150 


A 


250 


1 


750 


A 


100 


1 


300 


A 


125 


1 


375 


A 


150 


1 


450 


A 


100 


1 


300 


A 



A 
A 
Y 
Y 
Y 

Y 

A 
Y 
Y 
Y 
Y 

Y 
Y 
Y 
V 
Y 

A 
Y 

A 
A 
A 



112 



FIFTEENTH ANNUAL REPORT OF THE 



No. RO- 



TABLE OF TRANSFORMING STATION 



Station 


Circuits 


System 
number 


Name 


Date 

placed 

in 

operation 


Type 
of building 


High 
voltage 


Low 

voltage 




Volts 1 No. 


Volts 


No. 



WASDETLS 



Wasdells Falls dist. sta. 
Beaverton dist. sta. . . . 
Cannington dist. sta . . . 
Kirkfield dist. sta 



Greenbank dist. sta 



Sept., 1914 
Sept., 1914 
Sept., 1914 
April 22, 1920 

Sept., 1922 



concrete special 
G. special brick 
G. brick 
H. concrete 

P. outdoor 



22,000 


2 


2,30u 


22,000 


1 


4,000 


22,000 


1 


4,000 


/ 22,000 
\ 4,000 


1 


575 


1 


575 


22,000 


1 


4,000 



MUSKOKA 


M 1 
M 2 


South Falls gen. sta 

Huntsville dist. sta 


Sept., 


1916 


brick special 
G. brick special 


22,000 
22,000 


1 
1 


6,600 
2,300 


1 
1 




















ST. LAWRENCE 



Cornwall trans, sta 



Prescott dist. sta. . . . 
Brockville dist. sta . . 
Winchester dist. sta. 
Chesterville dist. sta. 



Cornwall Howard Smith 
Paper Co. dist. sta. . . . 



Williamsburg dist. sta 
Martintown dist. sta. . 
Apple Hill dist. sta. . . 
Alexandria dist. sta. . . 



Morrisburg dist. sta 
Reserve 



May 1, 1919 

Mar., 1914 
April, 1915 
July 18, 1914 
Aug. 3, 1919 



June 15, 1919 

Dec. 24, 1920 
May 25, 1921 
Feb. 22, 1921 
Jan. 18, 1921 

Oct. 1, 1922 



brick 

G. outdoor 

brick 

G. brick 

S. outdoor mod. 



brick 

outdoor 
R. outdoor 
S. outdoor mod 
S. outdoor mod 

outdoor 



110,000 


2 


44,001 


44,000 
44,000 
26,400 
26,400 


1 

1 
1 
1 


2,400 
2,400 
4,000 
4,160 


44,000 


1 


600 


26,400 
44,000 
44,000 
44,000 


1 
1 

1 
1 


2,400 
4,160 
4,160 
4,160 


44,000 


1 


26,400 









RIDEAU 



hlign rans gen. sta. . . . 

Perth dist. sta 

Smiths Falls dist. sta.. . 
Carleton Place dist. sta . 

Balderson dist. sta 

Kemptville dist. sta.. . . 



iviay i, iV2U 

Feb. 27, 1920 
Sept. 15, 1918 
May 31, 1920 
Sept. 29, 1921 
Nov. 28, 1921 



concrete 

G. brick mod. 

stone 

brick 

R. outdoor 

R. outdoor 



2^,40t 


1 


4,16. 


26,400 


1 


2,30C 


25,400 


1 


2,400 


26,400 


1 


2,20C 


26,400 


1 


2,400 


25,400 


1 


4,16C 



THUNDER BAY 


P 1 


Nipigon gen. sta 


Dec. 20, 1920 
Dec. 20, 1920 


concrete special 
wood frame and 

gunite special 
brick sDecial 


110,000 

110,000 
22,000 


1 

1 
4 


12,00J 

22,000 
2,200 


2 


P 2 
P231 


Pt. Arthur trans, sta. ...... 

Pt. Arthur dist. sta 


3 
8 










CENTRAL ONTARIO AND TRENT 



Sidney term, sta 

Brighton trans, sta . . . 
Colborne trans, sta . . 
Ranney Falls gen. sta 

Seymour gen. sta 



Cobourg trans, sta. 



Healey Falls gen. sta. 
Port Hope trans, sta. 



Auburn gen. sta. . . 
Auburn trans, sta-,- 



1911* 
1911* 
1912* 
1922 

1909* 

1911* 

1914* 
1912Jfe 

1912* 
1912* 



brick special 
brick special 
brick special 
concrete special 

and stone 
special stone 

brick special 

brick special 
brick special 

brick special 
brick special 



44,000 
44,000 
44,000 


3 
1 
1 


6,600 
4,160 
2,400 


44,000 
44,000 


1 
2 


6,600 
2,400 


44,000 


1 


2,400 


44,000 
44,000 


3 
1 


6,600 
2,400 


6,600 
44,000 


4 

1 


2,400 
6,600 



Note. — For subnotes a, b, c, etc., : see end of table. 



923 



HYDRO-ELECTRIC POWER COMMISSION 



113 



DETAILS AS OF OCTOBER 31, 1922— Continued 



Transformers 



Active 




Spare 




No. 
of 


No. 
of 

units 


Make 

of 
units 


Unit 
kv-a. 


Phase 

rating 

of 

unit 


Total 
kv-a. 


Banks 
connected 


Single phase except 

where otherwise 

stated 


banks 


H.V. 


L.V. 


No. 


Make 


Unit 
kv-a. 



SYSTEM— 60 Cycles 



C.W. Co. 


150 


1 


900 


A 


C.W. Co. 


100 


1 


300 


A 


C.W. Co. 


100 


1 


300 


A 


P.E. Co. 


75 


1 


225 


A 


M.E. Co. 


10 


1 


30 


Y 


C.G.E. Co. 


150 


3 


150 


A 



C.G.E. Co. 


5,000 


1 


15,000 


Y 


P. E. Co. 


300 


3 


300 


Y 


C.G.E. Co. 


750 


3 


1,500 


Y 


C.G.E. Co. 


50 


1 


150 


A 


C.G.E. Co. 


300 


3 


300 


A 


C.G.E. Co. 


1,500 


3 


1,500 


Y 


C.G.E. Co. 


750 


3 


750 


Y 


M.E. Co. 


30 


1 


30 


10 


P.E. Co. 


150 


3 


150 


Y 


P.E. Co. 


300 


3 


300 


Y 


P.E. Co. 


300 


3 


300 


Y 


P.E. Co. 


300 


3 


300 


Y 


C.G.E. Co. 


750 


3 


750 


A 
25,400 



A 
A 

10 
Y 
Y 
Y 



A 

A 

600 



1 C.W. Co. 



150 



SYSTEM— 60 Cycles 


1 


3 
3 


C.G.E. Co.l 
C.G.E. Co.| 


400 
300 


1 
1 


1,200 
900 


A 
A 


A 
A 








1 








SYSTEM— 60 Cycles 



C.G.E. Co. 5,000 
C.G.E. Co. 1,250 



SYSTEM— 60 Cycles 



P.E. Co. 


750 


3 


2,250 


A 


C.W. Co. 


200 


1 


600 


A 


C.G.E. Co. 


750 


3 


750 


A 


P.T. Co. 


250 


1 


750 


A 


M.E. Co. 


I 30 


1 


30 




P.E. Co. 


150 


3 


150 


A 



C.W. Co. 
C.G.E. Co. 
C.G.E. Co. 

C.G.E. Co. 
C.W. Co. 

C.G.E. Co. 

C.G.E. Co, 
C.W. Co. 

C.G.E. Co. 

C.G.E. Co 

C.G.E. Co. 

C.G.E. Co. 



3,000 


3 


9,000 


Y 


100 


1 


300 


A 


100 


1 


100 




4,500 


3 


9,000 


Y 


1,125 


3 


4,500 


Y 


300 


3 


300 


Y 


750 


3 


750 


Y 


3,750 


3 


11,250 


Y 


750 


' 3 


750 


Y 


300 


3 


300 


Y 


200 


1 


600 


A 


1,875 


3 


3,750 


Y 



A 
Y 

A 

A 
A 
A 
A 
A 
A 



SYSTEM— 60 Cycles 


1 

1 
2 


3 

3 
6 


C.G.E. Co. 

C.G.E. Co. 
S.Co. of C. 


8,000 

4,000 
750 


1 

1 
1 


24,000 

12,000 
4,500 


Y 

Y 
Y 


A 

A 
A 


1 

1 
1 


C.G.E. Co. 

C.G.E. Co. 
S.Co. of C. 


8,000 

4,000 
750 


SYSTEM— 60 Cycles 

















C.G.E. Co. 



300 



114 



FIFTEENTH ANNUAL REPORT OF THE 



No. 49 



TABLE OF TRANSFORMING STATION 





Station 






Circuits 




System 
number 


Name 


Date 

placed 

in 

operation 


Type 
of building 


High 
voltage 


Low 

voltage 




Volts 


No. 


Volts 


No. 



CENTRAL ONTARIO AND TRENT 



C 20 
C22 
C23 
C24 

C25 

C26 
C29 

C30 

C31 

C32 

C 33 
C 34 
C 36 
C 37 

C 38 



C 41 
C 42 
C 43 

C 44 
C 45 
C 46 
C 47 



Peterboro trans, sta. . . . 
Newcastle trans, sta.. . . 
Bowmanville trans, sta. 
Oshawa trans, sta 



Millbrook trans, sta. 

Omemee trans, sta. . 
Lindsay trans, sta. . . 



Fenelon Falls gen. sta. 
Norwood trans, sta. . . 
Deloro trans, sta 



Madoc trans, sta. . . . 
Sulphide trans, sta.. 
Pulp Mill trans, sta. 
Trenton trans, sta.. 



Belleville trans, sta. 



Belleville Cement Co 

Point Anne Quarries trans 

sta 

Lehigh Cement trans, sta. . . 

Deseronto trans, sta 

Napanee trans, sta 



Kingston trans, sta.. . 
Wellington trans, sta. 

Picton trans, sta 

Marmora trans, sta.. 



1912* 

1911* 
1912* 
1911* 

1912* 

Jan. 17, 1918 
1912* 



Jan. 12, 1921 

1909* 

1909* 
1910* 
1909* 



1910* 

1911* 

1910* 
1911* 
1911* 
1912* 

1917 
Mar 25, 1919 
Mar. 6, 1919 
Dec. 14, 1920 



spec. met. frame 
brick special.. . . 
brick special., 
brick special 



outdoor special 
brick special 

brick special 

S. outdoor mod 
special 
brick special 

brick special 
brick special 
concrete special 
brick special 

brick special 

brick special 

brick special 
brick special 
brick special 
brick special 

brick special 
S. outdoor 
S. outdoor 
outdoor special 



6.600 
44,000 
44,000 
44,000 


4 

1 
1 
1 


2,400 
2,400 
2,400 
4,160 


44,000 


1 


2,400 


44.000 
11,000 


1 
2 


4,160 
4,160 


11,000 


2 


600 


44,000 
44,000 


1 
1 


4,160 
600 


44,000 

44,000 

44,000 

6,600 


1 
1 

1 
2 


4,160 
2,400 
2,400 
4,160 


44,000 


1 


2,400 


44,000 


1 


600 


44,000 
44,000 
44,000 
44,000 


1 

1 
1 
1 


600 

600 
2,400 
4,160 


44,000 
44,000 
44,000 
44,000 


1 
1 
1 

1 


2,400 
4,160 
2,400 
2,400 



NIPISSING 



Z 1 

Z 2 
Z 3 



Nipissing gen. sta.. 
Powassan dist. sta. 
Callander dist. sta. 



Z 4 North Bay dist. sta 1909* 

Z 98 Reserve equipment Sept. 7, 1921 



1909* 
1909* 
1909* 



brick special 
brick special 
sheet metal, 
special 

brick special 



22,000 
22,000 

22,000 



22.000 1 



2,200 
2,400 

2,200 

2,200 



a. Includes one constant-current street-lighting feeder, the property of the municipality. 

b. Includes two constant-current street-lighting feeders, the property of the municipality. 

c. Not yet in service on October 31, 1922. 

d. On construction feeder. Transformers brought from Whirlpool and Montrose. 

e. Feeders are the property of the municipality. 

/. Date placed in temporary service, the installation was completed on January 30, 1916. 
g. Remodelled station. 



923 



HYDRO-ELECTRIC POWER COMMISSION 



115 



DETAILS AS OF OCTOBER 31, 1922— Continued 













rransformers 










Active 


Spare 


No. 

of 


No. 

of 

units 


Make 

of 
units 


Unit 
kv-a. 


Phase 

rating 

of 

unit 


Total 
kv-a. 


Banks 
connected 


Single phase except 

where otherwise 

stated 


banks 


H.V. 


L.V. 


No. 


Make 


Unit 

kv-a. 



SYSTEM— 60 Cycles— Continued 



4 
1 


\ 

2 
2 
2 
1 

3 

2 
1 
6 

1 
3 

3 
2 
2 
6 
1 
3 

2 
1 
2 
4 
2 
2 

3 
1 
1 
1 


C.G.E. Co. 
C.G.E. Co. 
C.G.E. Co. 
C.G.E. Co. 
C.G.E. Co. 
C.G.E. Co. 

M.E.Co... 
C.G.E. Co. 
C.G.E. Co. 
C.G.E. Co. 

P.E. Co. 
C.W. Co. 

C.G.E. Co. 
C.C.W. Co. 
C.W. Co. 
C.G.E. Co. 
C.G.E. Co. 
C.G.E. Co. 

C.G.E. Co. 
C.G.E. Co. 
C.G.E. Co. 
C.G.E. Co. 
C.G.E. Co. 
C.G.E. Co. 

C.G.E. Co. 
C.G.E. Co. 
C.G.E. Co. 
M.E.Co... 


750 
100 
750 
1,500 
750 
100 

40 

750 
750 
135 

300 
250 

300 

240 

1,125 

100 

750 
750 

750 
100 
300 
750 
300 
300 

750 

300 

300 

50 


3 
1 
3 
3 
3 
1 

1 
3 
3 
1 

3 
1 

3 

3 
3 
1 
3 
3 

3 

3 
3 
3 
3 

3 
3 
3 

1 


3,000 
100 
1,500 
3,000 
1,500 
100 

120 
1,500) 

750/ 
810 

300 

750 

900 

480 

2,250 

600 

750 

2,250 

1,500 
100 
600 

3,000 
600 
600 

2,250 

300 

300 

50 


Y 


A 








? 


Y 
Y 
Y 

Y 
Y 
Y 

A 

Y 

A 

Y 
Y 
Y 

A 
A 
Y 

Y 


A 
Y 
Y 

Y 
Y 
Y 

A 

Y 

A 

Y 

A 
Y 
Y 
Y 

A 

A 








[2 

\2 

1 

1 

{- 


1 


C.G.E. Co. 


750 








2 

1 
1 


/I 
\1 


C.G.E. Co. 
C.G.E. Co. 


135 
750 


3 






2 








2 








t? 

3 




















/2 








1 








2 


Y 
Y 
Y 
Y 

Y 
Y 
Y 


A 
A 
A 
Y 

A 
Y 

A 








4 








2 








2 








3 








1 








1 








1 









SYSTEM— 6( 


) Cycles 


















1 


3 
3 

2 

3 
3 


P.E. Co.... 
C.G.E. Co. 

/A.C.B. 
IC.G.E. 
C.W. Co. 
C.W. Co. 


900 
50 

50\ 

25/ 
450 
300 




2,700 
150 

75 


•A 
A 

V 


A 
A 

V 








1 








1 
















1 




1,350 
900 


A 
22,000 


A 
2.200 

























h. Operation taken over by the Hydro-Electric Power Commission in August, 1916. 

i. Temporary. 

j. Feeders, other than those shown, are owned by customers. 

k. Operation taken over by the Hydro-Electric Power Commission in March, 1916. 

/. Transformer good for 50 kv-a. at 44,000 volts. 

ra. Voltage rating.. 

n. Includes one feeder owned by the municipality. 



116 FIFTEENTH ANNUAL REPORT OF THE No. 49 



SECTION V 



HYDRAULIC ENGINEERING AND CONSTRUCTION 

During the past year much valuable work was initiated and brought to 
completion by the Hydraulic department. This included the completion of 
the St. Lawrence River report, which is now before the International Joint 
Commission for consideration. Steady progress has been made on the Queenston- 
Chippawa development; four units having been placed in operation, with the 
prospect of number five being ready shortly. 

On the Central Ontario and Trent system, the Ranney Falls development 
has been completed, and the units put on commercial load. 

In addition to these major activities, surveys and hydraulic studies have 
been made in considerable number, with the result that many valuable data, 
respecting the regimen and regulation of our provincial rivers have been obtained. 

The Commission has, as previously, acted in an advisory capacity to many 
of the municipalities, in some cases rendering more practical assistance by 
making surveys and drawing up plans. 

These matters are referred to at greater length below. 



NIAGARA SYSTEM 
QUEENSTON-CHIPPAWA DEVELOPMENT 

Hydraulic Construction 

The method of procedure for the completion of the canal and power house 
has been fully described in the report of this department for 1921. 

Briefly, the status of the work in November, 1921, was as follows: 

At the power house, foundations were in place for three main turbines, 
with two of the turbines set in position. The building was completed sufficiently 
to house units Nos. 1 and 2, at that time being erected. Some work had been 
done in preparing the foundation for No. 4 turbine. The penstock for unit 
No. 1 was in position and work was proceeding on the erection of penstocks 
for unit No. 2 and the service units. 

The substructure for the screen-house was practically complete for the nine 
units, and superstructure erected for six units. The shaft for the main elevator 
was under construction. 

The forebay was complete, except for cleaning-up. 

The canal was in an advanced stage of construction. The five large shovels 
were working on a schedule to complete excavation about the end of November, 
and these shovels were being followed by scaling operations and six complete 
lining plants. Practically all of this work was going on in the section between 
Lundy's Lane and Montrose. 

The control-gate at Montrose was being assembled. 

The work was in progress on the construction of the double-track bridge 
crossing the canal on the main line of the Michigan Central railroad at Montrose. 



1923 



HYDRO-ELECTRIC POWER COMMISSION 



17 




QUEENSTON-CHIPPAWA DEVELOPMENT 

Control Gate near Montrose. Men clearing the canal preparatory to admitting 

water. December 22, 1921 



H8 FIFTEENTH ANNUAL REPORT OF THE No. 49 

The dredge "Boone" was still working at Chippawa in preparation for the 
coming year's work. 

The work done during the fiscal year 1922 resulted in the completion of 
the canal; further extension of the power house; river dredging and the con- 
struction of the initial installation of the intake at Chippawa. 

Power House 

During the year covered by this report, the power house was extended to 
provide for the first five units and the temporary end was under construction 
to house in this section of the building. Four turbines and Johnson valves 
were practically complete, and the fifth turbine and valve under construction. 
All five main penstocks were complete, as was also the service penstock. 

Erection was proceeding with the administration building, at the south 
end of the screen-house, and the placing of structural steel in the main elevator 
shaft. 

On December 24, water was admitted to the canal and forebay, and the 
power house was officially opened by the turning on of No. 1 unit on December 
28, 1921. (See frontispiece.) Units went into commercial operation as follows: 

No. 1 unit on January 26, 1922. 
No. 2 unit on March 16, 1922. 
No. 3 unit on August 11, 1922. 
Canal 

Excavation of the canal was completed on November 30, 1921; three of 
the five shovels finishing their assigned work within three days of this date. 

The concreting of the floor and walls of the canal was finished on December 
21, and immediately thereafter all of the excavating and concreting plants were 
withdrawn from the canal; about 5,000 tons of construction plant being removed 
from the lined section of the canal in the five succeeding days. 

During the latter stages of the work, the dredge "Hennessey" was working 
in the vicinity of the dam between the dry section of the canal and that which 
had been excavated by dredging, and on December 24, 1921, the remainder of 
the core between the two sections was removed and water was allowed to enter 
the canal through a small channel, thus supplying water to turn over the first 
unit at the power house. 

Dredging was continued for a month thereafter at this point, in order to 
provide a sufficient waterway for operation purposes. 

Intake and River Section 

The dredge "Boone" was shut down on November 8, 1921, having completed 
its work for the season. By that date the cofferdams, surrounding the site of 
the intake structure, had been finished and unwatering was commenced. 

The site of the intake was completely unwatered and pumps were 
maintained in operation for about a month. By this time it was proved that 
the cofferdams were watertight, and it was then decided to discontinue pumping. 
In the spring, water had risen within the cofferdams to a considerable height, 
owing to the natural drainage which reached it from the land side. 

In April, 1922, a contract was let to Messrs. Tomlinson, Macaw and Mac- 
donald, of Winnipeg, for the construction of the intake and ship channel at 
Chippawa, and active work in connection with this contract was commenced 
immediately after tfie final unwatering of the site in April. 

This contract comprised the construction of a breast wall parallel to the 
direction of the flow of the Niagara river, containing six main openings with 
retaining walls at each end. Between the main structure and the upstream 



1923 



HYDRO-ELECTRIC POWER COMMISSION 




QUEENSTON-CHIPPAWA DEVELOPMENT 

Intake in the Niagara River at Chippawa. Diffuser Openings Nos. 5 to 1. The immense size of 

these structures may be appreciated by noting the figures of the men and team 




QUEENSTON-CHIPPAWA DEVELOPMENT 
Intake in the Niagara River at Chippawa. Looking out through No. 4 Inner Diffuser. 
of each of these openings measures 36 ft. wide by 32 ft. 9 in. high 



The mouth 



|20 FIFTEENTH ANNUAL REPORT OF THE No. 49 

shore, there is built a ship channel 80 feet in width, providing for the installation 
of a single pair of lock gates. The shore of the Niagara river above the ship 
channel is protected by crib-work for a short distance, and between the intake 
structure and the standard river section the slopes are protected by hand-laid 
rip-rap. The whole structure, including the inner basin, occupies an area of 
about 20 acres. 

The work was prosecuted diligently throughout the summer, and the 
excavation was advanced sufficiently to permit of a start being made on the 
concrete structure on July 8, 1922. 

The contract called for the completion of this work by December 1, 1922, 
and the progress of the work to date would indicate that the contractor will be 
able to meet the prescribed schedule in so far as the erection of the structure is 
concerned, although it is probable that the withdrawal of the sheet-piling in 
the cofferdam will not be accomplished until some time during the winter. 

A contract was awarded in April, 1922, to Messrs. E. O. Leahey and Com- 
pany, Limited, of Ottawa, for the dredging of the river section and the upper 
portion of the canal, to provide sufficient waterway for five units. The con- 
tractor immediately arranged for the construction of a new hydraulic dredge 
for this work, delivery of which was promised in July. Construction of this 
dredge was not carried on with sufficient speed to secure delivery by the date 
promised, and the contractor was requested to commence excavation using 
another dredge, which he leased for the purpose. This dredge started work 
about August 1, and continued during the year. 

Parts of the new dredge "Stewart" commenced to arrive at Chippawa in 
July, and the contractor immediately commenced the installation of the 
machinery. This dredge was put in commission on October 26, 1922. 

The first work undertaken was the removal of the earth in the vicinity of 
the Michigan Central Railway bridge at Montrose, which had been completed 
in July, and it is expected that the channel under this bridge will be in use in 
December, 1922. The dredge will then continue to excavate under the contract, 
first working in those localities requiring immediate attention. 

Bridges 

During the past year progress has been made on bridges across the canal. 
The M.C.R.-G.T.R. Main Line Arch which was completed last year has been 
backfilled. The M.C.R. Montrose Bridge was completed in August, the steel 
superstructure having been erected by the Canadian Bridge Company. With 
reference to the N.S. & T.R. Arch — the barrel of which was completed two 
years ago by the Commission — a contract was let, late in the summer, for con- 
struction of the wing walls, and a start has been made on this work. Contracts 
for the substructures, flooring and backfilling of the Highway Bridges at Lundys 
Lane, Portage Road and Thorold Road were let to Messrs. Campbell and 
Lattimore, and for the steel superstructures to the Canadian Bridge Company. 
The work was started in June and by the middle of September all the piers and 
abutments were finished. Since then the Bridge Company has made good 
progress with the superstructure of the Lundys Lane bridge. 

SEVERN SYSTEM 

Severn River 

A reconnaissance survey and preliminary estimate was made with regard 
to developing power at Port Severn on the Severn river in conjunction with the 



1923 HYDRO-ELECTRIC POWER COMMISSION [21 

present canal scheme for the purpose of supplying the demand on the Severn 
system. 

This development is situated at the point where the Severn river enters 
Georgian bay; there being at this location a fall of twelve to fourteen feet. 
During the canalizing of the river the Department of Railways and Canals 
placed a concrete dam at this point and installed a lock, leaving the necessary 
sluiceways for the development of power. The site of the power house is there- 
fore well defined. The power developed at this plant would approximate 2,000 
horsepower. 

MUSKOKA SYSTEM 

Muskoka River 

The plant, owned and operated by the Commission and situated on the 
South branch of the Muskoka river, was purchased by the Commission from the 
municipality of Gravenhurst in 1914. Since that time an additional unit has 
been added, but, owing to the continuous and increasing demand from Graven- 
hurst and the surrounding municipalities, it has been necessary to purchase 
additional power for distribution from the Bracebridge municipal plant. As 
this supply is neither dependable enough nor large enough in quantity, it has 
therefore become necessary to install another pipe line and unit in the South 
Falls plant. This entails the development of further storage, and plans are 
now being prepared with the purpose in mind of proceeding with the work at 
an early date. 

ST. LAWRENCE SYSTEM 

St. Lawrence River 

The Commission's Statement and Engineering Report, dealing with the 
development of the St. Lawrence river, was submitted to the International 
Joint Commission at a Public Hearing in Ottawa on November 14 and 15, 1921. 
The report is based on the surveys and investigations carried on during the past 
three years, and includes plans and estimates of three alternative schemes of 
development of the international reach of the river for power and navigation. 
A great amount of data regarding river discharge and elevation, topographic 
features, rock elevations, etc., have been collected and plotted. Numerous 
maps and diagrams on which this information is plotted are now on file in addition 
to those submitted in the report. 

Studies have been continued of systems by which the out-flow from lake 
Ontario might be regulated in order to benefit power and navigation to the 
greatest extent possible, and observations have been made of the formation 
and movement of ice in the river. 



THUNDER BAY SYSTEM 

Nipigon Development 

Owing to the rush schedule on the Nipigon development, and the necessity 
of producing commercial power by December, 1920, it was found that it would 
be impossible to complete the concrete dam before the winter season. It was 



122 FIFTEENTH ANNUAL REPORT OF THE No. 49 

therefore decided to postpone construction until the following spring. In order, 
however, that water might be obtained in sufficient supply to operate the two 
machines installed, it was necessary to build a temporary rock-filled crib dam. 
This was placed in such a manner that it might be used as a cofferdam during 
construction of the concrete section which was to be placed a short distance 
down stream during the coming spring. 

During construction of the main dam the flow of the river, over and above 
that necessary for turbine operation, was discharged through the supply pipes 
which had been built for future additions to the plant. The dam, which is of 
the concrete gravity type and built on solid rock, was completed during the 
latter part of 1921, after which the temporary cofferdam was removed. 

The dam having been completed, little remained to be done except the build- 
ing of the fishway. This was necessary in order to comply with the requirements 
of the Department of Game and Fisheries that means should be provided for 
fish to travel up and down the river. 



CENTRAL ONTARIO AND TRENT SYSTEM 

Ranney Falls Development 

During the year the new development at Ranney Falls was practically 
brought to completion. The substructure being practically complete at the 
end of last year, work was begun on the erection of the equipment and super- 
structure, with the result that power was delivered on the line during the summer 
of 1922. 

The intake for the plant is through sluiceways built by the Department 
of Railways and Canals at the time the Trent Valley canal was constructed. 
Through these, water enters the forebay, and thence is conducted to the wheels 
through concrete supply pipes and scroll cases. The turbines built and designed 
by the Boving Hydraulic Company, of Lindsay, Ontario, are of the vertical 
single discharge type, equipped with Moody draft tubes, and develop 5,000 
horsepower each under 47-foot head when operating at a speed of 120 rev. 
per minute. The superstructure of the power house was finished in natural stone 
excavated from the power-house site, and therefore has an appearance in keeping 
with its surroundings. 

Dams No. 8 and No. 9, Trent River 

Owing to the continuously increasing demand for power on the Central 
Ontario system, it has been almost impossible to keep pace with the requirements 
of the municipalities, without seriously overloading all available plant. To 
eliminate this condition, and to provide a reasonable margin of capacity for 
future needs, plans and estimates have been made for the development of power 
at Dams No. 8 and No. 9 on the Trent canal, some five miles below Campbell- 
ford. At the time the Department of Railways and Canals constructed the 
waterway, provision was made at these points for future power development, 
so that any development scheme must be confined within certain prescribed 
limits and be approved by the Department. 

It is proposed to develop Dam No. 8 for approximately 6,600 horsepower, 
and there is available here a head of about 36 feet. It is proposed to develop 
from the available head of 24 feet at Dam No. 9, about 4,000 horsepower. 



1923 



HYDRO-ELECTRIC POWER COMMISSION 



123 




[24 FIFTEENTH ANNUAL REPORT OF THE No. 49 

Since these sites are very closely related, it is likely that construction will pro- 
ceed on both at the same time. 

The appropriation for this work has been secured, and construction will 
be commenced in the spring of 1923. 

Trent River 

During the past few years the Commission has retained in this district a 
competent engineer in order that complete studies might be made of the regimen 
of the Trent river and tributary streams. Stream-flow measurements have 
been made at various points, and efforts have been made to rate satisfactorily 
the power houses, in order that reliable flow records might be obtained. 

Extensive studies have been made in order to determine the storage 
available on this river and the control of its flow, and very satisfactory results 
have been obtained. 

Crow River 

In order that the flow might be augmented for plants on the Trent 
river, studies have been made with regard to obtaining storage on the Crow 
River watershed. With this end in view, a dam was recently constructed at 
the outlet of Kashabog lake which impounded some 28,000 acre-feet. The 
investigation is proceeding and it is likely that in the near future further dams 
will be built on this watershed. 



NIPISSING SYSTEM 

South River 

Owing to the increased demand on the Nipissing system and the ever- 
growing needs of the district, it was necessary that an additional source of power 
be obtained. With this end in view, a survey was made and plans drawn up 
for a possible development at Bingham chute on the South river. This site is 
near the village of Powassan. The head at the site is approximately 45 feet, 
permitting of a development of about 1,300 horsepower. An estimate was 
made and submitted to the Commission and the necessary appropriation having 
been authorized, construction will proceed as early in the spring of 1923 as weather 
permits. 

MISCELLANEOUS 

Aux Sable River 

At the request of the municipality of Massey, situated on the Aux Sable 
river, a tributary of the Spanish river which flows into Georgian bay, a recon- 
naissance is being made to determine whether a satisfactory hydro-electric 
development could be made at that point to supply the town. Massey is a 
growing town near the north shore of the Georgian bay, which is served by the 
Canadian Pacific railway. Its chief industries are lumbering and the manu- 
facture of pulp. It was considered locally that if there were a possibility of a 
development in the immediate vicinity, power for local requirements might be 
made available at reasonable rates. 



1923 HYDRO-ELECTRIC POWER COMMISSION 125 



Saugeen River 

Owing to the increased needs of the district, it will be necessary shortly to 
augment the supply of power in the Eugenia district. With this end in view, a 
detailed survey was made some years ago of the Saugeen river in the vicinity 
of lake Huron. This scheme would provide somewhat over 100 feet of head 
and make possible a development of approximately 12,000 horsepower. Some 
further investigations will be necessary to establish definitely the feasibility 
and economy of this scheme. 

Seguin River 

Following the request of the municipality of Parry Sound, as mentioned 
in last year's report, further investigations were made with regard to the storage 
possibilities of the Upper Seguin River watershed. This entailed surveys, 
b>oth instrumental and reconnaissance in nature, particularly since the munici- 
pality had for some time past been in trouble regarding drowned land claims 
for sto r age already developed. It was necessary, therefore, to survey and list 
these claims in order that the municipality might be able to make satisfactory 
settlement. 

St. Mary River 

At the request of the municipality of Sault Ste. Marie, a reconnaissance 
was made of the existing situation with regard to the possibilities of producing 
additional power from the St. Mary river for the use of the municipality. In 
connection with this, the Commission's engineers made a survey of the rapids 
and developed therefrom the contours along the river bank. Based on this 
survey, a preliminary report is in course of preparation. 

Thessalon River 

At the request of the municipalities of Thessalon and Bruce Mines, a recon- 
naissance survey was made of the power possibilities of the Thessalon river, 
to determine the advisability of developing power thereon for the joint use 
of both municipalities. A preliminary report was prepared and submitted to 
the municipalities for their information. 

Vermilion River 

At the request of the town of Capreol, a reconnaissance was made of the 
Vermilion river as a possible source of power supply for the municipality. The 
Vermilion river is a tributary of the Spanish river which flows into Georgian 
bay and on which good facilities for storage are available. Capreol is a divisional 
point on the Canadian National Railways system, and the shops for that division 
are located at this point. The surrounding country is noted for its wood-pulp 
industries and mineral deposits. The head obtainable at the proposed develop- 
ment is 25 feet, and approximately 650 horsepower could be developed. 



26 FIFTEENTH ANNUAL REPORT OF THE No. 49 



SECTION VI 

MUNICIPAL WORK 
NIAGARA SYSTEM 

General engineering assistance in connection with the operation of the 
local systems was given to the following municipalities : — 

Ailsa Craig, Ayr, Barton Township, Beachville, Bolton, Brampton, Brant- 
ford, Burford, Burgessville, Caledonia, Chippawa, Clinton, Dashwood, Delaware, 
Dorchester, Drayton, Drumbo, Dublin, Dundas, Elmira, Fergus, Georgetown, 
Granton, Hagersville, Harriston, Ingersoll, Listowel, London, Lynden, Markham, 
Merritton, Milverton, Mitchell, Moorefield, Mount Brydges, New Hamburg, 
New Toronto, Niagara Falls, Niagara-on-the-Lake, Norwich, Otterville, Palmer- 
ston, Paris, Parkhill, Plattsville, Port Colborne, Port Credit, Port Dalhousie, 
Port Dover, Port Stanley, Princeton, Queenston, Seaforth, Simcoe, Springfield, 
St. Jacobs, St. Marys, Stamford Township, Strathroy, Tavistock, Thamesford, 
Thorndale, Thorold, Tillsonburg, Toronto Township, Waterdown, Waterford, 
Waterloo, Welland, West Lome, Weston, Woodbridge and Woodstock. 

Acton 

Assistance was given the municipality in connection with the management 
of the local system and engineering advice was given regarding extensions to 
take care of new customers and increasing domestic loads. 

Agincourt 

General engineering assistance was given in connection with separating 
the distribution system in the village of Agincourt from the remainder of the 
township of Scarboro with which it was formerly operated. The village system 
was placed on a separate and satisfactory operating basis. 

Alvinston 

The distribution system in Alvinston was reconstructed by the Com- 
mission's staff on behalf of the village. A 4,000-volt line was constructed from 
Watford to Alvinston and the Alvinston system was made alive on March 22, 
1922. Assistance was given to the local management in connection with supply- 
ing power customers and also in connection with putting the system on a satis- 
factory operating basis. 

Aylmer 

Owing to the increased use of domestic appliances during the year, ex- 
tensions to the distribution system were required. The system originally was 
designed and installed to take care of a lighting load and the power requirements 
at that time. Engineering assistance was given to the local Public Utilities 
commission in connection with the extensions to the system and in matters of 
operation. 



1923 HYDRO-ELECTRIC POWER COMMISSION 127 

Belle River Village 

By-laws for $13,500 were passed by this village on July 13, 1922, and work 
was commenced by the Commission's staff on the building of the street lighting 
and distribution system. Sufficient contracts were secured to put the system 
on a paying basis from the start. 

Plans were completed for a 26,400-volt line from Essex station to the village, 
and arrangements were made for the construction of an outdoor-type station 
at Belle River. It is anticipated that power can be supplied about December, 
1922. 

Burford 

During the past few years the municipality of Burford has been considerably 
extending its system. In 1922 it became necessary to issue additional deben- 
tures for $4,000, to take care of extensions. Engineering assistance was given 
to the municipality in connection with this work. 

Chippawa 

Engineering assistance was given to the municipality regarding increased 
transformer capacity on its distribution system and also regarding various 
matters in connection with the operation of the system. 

Dutton 

During the year assistance was given to the local system management in 
connection with extensions required to handle electric range loads in the village, 
and also from time to time with the operation of the system. 

Embro 

Assistance was given to the local management in connection with the obtain- 
ing of a contract to supply the local chopping and flour mill with electric power 
and the making of an extension to serve the plant. From time to time the 
local management was guided in the handling of the system. 

Etobicoke Township 

The distribution system was greatly extended during the year, general 
supervision and engineering assistance being given in connection with this work. 
Additional debentures amounting to $30,000 were issued by the township to 
provide for the new construction. 

Exeter 

Engineering service during the year was given the local management re 
the necessary changes to their distribution system to take care of domestic 
appliances installed in the municipality. 

Ford City 

This municipality was originally supplied by a system constructed by the 
Hydro-Electric Power Commission and operated by Walkerville. It was 
deemed desirable, however, to make arrangements for Ford City to finance 
its own system. 

By-laws for $63,000 were submitted on January 2, 1922, and the system 
was purchased by the municipality from the Hydro-Electric Power Commission 
and from the municipality of Walkerville. A contract was arranged with the 
Commission and arrangements were made for power to be supplied through 
the Walkerville substation. 



128 FIFTEENTH ANNUAL REPORT OF THE No. 49 

Forest 

On April 9, 1922, the Forest distributing station and the Forest system 
was changed from 2,200 to 4,000 volts, and additional station equipment installed 
to supply the village of Thedford. 

Gait 

The new office building and substation was completed and formally opened 
on July 28, 1922. It is located in the centre of the city and is, therefore, advan- 
tageously situated both from a distribution and service standpoint. The 
building and equipment is modern in all respects, all switching being electrically 
operated by remote control from the operating room. This station receives 
all the power used by the city at 13,200 volts, and, in addition to the 2,200-volt 
feeders, has two outgoing 13,200-volt lines to local substations. 

The office part of the building has, in addition to the general office, a large 
display and storeroom for domestic appliances. An extensive merchandising 
business is carried on for the benefit of the consumers and a wiring department 
is also maintained to complete the service which is supplied. 

Goderich 

Additional demands for power necessitated some changes in the system to 
supply a large elevator company and a number of other large consumers. 
Assistance in connection with plans, etc., was given by the Hydro-Electric 
Power Commission. 

Hensall 

Assistance was given to the local superintendent respecting a few extensions 
to improve the local service and also to improve the power-factor of the dis- 
tribution system. Advice was also given in connection with matters pertaining 
to the operation of the local system. 

Hespeler 

The changes in the distribution system referred to in the 1921 report have 
been practically completed. The general increase in power load and the 
increased use of domestic appliances has necessitated increasing the capacity of 
the transformers in the local substation. 

Kitchener 

Conferences have been held with the engineers of the Commission in regard 
to new stations and circuits to supply the ever increasing loads. Considerable 
changes and revisions have been made in the distribution system in addition 
to new lines on King Street East. 

Lambeth 

As the local village distribution system required changes to provide better 
service for domestic loads, the Trustee Board of the village requested assistance 
to make the necessary changes. The services of an expert lineman were secured 
to overhaul the distribution system in general and improve the service. 

Lucan 

During the year engineering assistance was given the local commission 
respecting extensions to the local distribution system to improve the domestic 
service in the village, these extensions being necessary as a result of the larger 
use of domestic appliances. Matters of local management were taken up from 
time to time during the year. 



1923 HYDRO-ELECTRIC POWER COMMISSION 129 

Merlin 

A by-law was passed on January 2, 1922, and plans were completed for the 
rebuilding of the street lighting and distribution system. The building of a 
26,000-volt line from the Fletcher tap on the Tilbury line to Fletcher was 
arranged for; also the construction of an outdoor- type station at Fletcher and a 
4,000-volt line to be constructed from the station to Merlin. Power will be 
supplied to the Ontario Farmers Drainage Company at Fletcher for its brick 
and tile works. Power will be available early in December. 

Milton 

Estimates were prepared and arrangements made for extending the system 
to supply additional customers. Engineering advice was also given in connection 
with proposed betterments to the system to take care of domestic service. 

Mimico 

Assistance was given in connection with betterments and extensions to the 
distribution system and with the issue of $20,000 debentures to provide both 
for serving additional customers and for the provision of heavier lines and 
equipment made necessary by the additional use, on a large scale, of ranges 
and other domestic appliances. 

Niagara Falls 

To provide for the large increase in power consumption during the year, 
due chiefly to large growth in domestic uses, it became necessary to increase the 
substation capacity and also that of the lines. Engineering assistance was 
given to the municipality and debentures were issued by it to the extent of 
$100,000 for this work. 

Port Colborne 

Engineering assistance was given to this municipality on account of the 
extensive reconstruction of its distribution system necessitated by the heavy 
increase of domestic use of power. Debentures to the extent of $14,000 are 
being issued to cover this work and to provide for a rapidly increasing load. 

Port Dalhousie 

Owing to the fact that the municipality's distribution system was becoming 
old it became necessary to spend a considerable amount of money on its main- 
tenance in order to bring it up to standard construction. Approximately $5,000 
was spent on this work and on the many necessary extensions and increases to 
transformer capacity. 

Port Dover 

Engineering assistance was given to this municipality in obtaining an 
increased number of consumers on its system. 

Preston 

The distribution system was changed from 2,200 to 4,000 volts and new 
circuits erected in order to facilitate the removing of all poles from the main 
street. Plans were prepared for the remodelling and completion of the dis- 
tribution system, made necessary by the steady increase in load of power 
customers and domestic users. j£ 

5 H.C. 



130 FIFTEENTH ANNUAL REPORT OF THE No. 49 

Riverside 

This municipality was originally supplied by a system constructed by the 
Hydro-Electric Power Commission and operated by Walkerville. It was 
considered desirable, however, to make arrangements for Riverside to finance 
its own system. 

By-laws for $29,500 were submitted on January 2, 1922, and the system 
was purchased from the Hydro-Electric Power Commission and from the 
municipality of Walkerville. A contract for power was entered into with the 
Commission and arrangements were made to construct a 4,000-volt feeder from 
Walkerville distributing station to supply not only the town of Riverside but 
also Tecumseh and St. Clair Beach. Power will be supplied on the standard 
Hydro basis about November 1, 1922. 

Rodney 

Assistance was given to the local management with an extension to serve 
a power consumer. Assistance was also given from time to time in connection 
with the operation and management of the system. 

St. Clair Beach 

By-laws were submitted on January 2, 1922, for $6,500, for the building of 
a new distribution system. A contract for power was entered into with the 
Hydro-Electric Power Commission. The new distribution system was con- 
structed for the municipality by the Walkerville Hydro system, and arrange- 
ments made to supply power about November 1, 1922. 

St. Thomas 

Engineering assistance was given to the local commission from time to 
time during the year on extensions to the local system, including an extension 
to the Michigan Central Railway plant where a 375-horsepower synchronous 
motor is to be installed in the coming year as well as additional 13,200-volt 
transformer capacity. 

Assistance was given the local commission in connection with changes in 
the waterworks' feeder, and changes in the station and extensions. 

Scarboro Township 

Supervision was kept over the numerous extensions and betterments to the 
distribution system necessary to provide service to many additional customers. 

Money and enabling by-laws were passed providing for the management 
as a separate unit, and on the same basis as an urban municipality, of that 
portion of the distribution system lying within a defined area in the southern 
part of the township. Estimates were prepared covering the cost of the dis- 
tribution system so set apart. 

Stratford 

The increasing demand for current, especially for domestic appliances, 
was responsible for the request by the municipality for assistance in purchasing 
additional station equipment. Plans are being prepared for changing from 
2,300 volts delta to 2,300 volts "Y" and a 1,500-kv-a. transformer has been 
ordered for the local substation. The Appliance department, which has been 
carried on successfully during the year, has rendered a much needed service, 
as shown by the volume of sales. 



1923 HYDRO-ELECTRIC POWER COMMISSION I3J 

Tecumseh 

This municipality was originally supplied by a system constructed by the 
Hydro-Electric Power Commission and operated by Walkerville. It was 
considered desirable, however, to make arrangements for Tecumseh to finance 
its own system. 

By-laws for $18,500 were submitted on January 2, 1922, and the system 
was purchased from the Commission and from the municipality of Walkerville. 
A contract for power was entered into with the Hydro-Electric Power Com- 
mission and arrangements were made to construct a 4,000-volt feeder from 
Walkerville distributing station to supply Tecumseh, Riverside and St. Clair 
Beach. Power will be supplied on the standard Hydro basis about November 
1, 1922. 

Thedford 

A 4,000-volt line from Forest to Thedford was constructed by the Hydro- 
Electric Power Commission and the local distribution system was remodelled 
and put into operation on May 18, 1922. Assistance was given to the local 
management to put the system on a satisfactory operating basis, a number of 
good power customers being secured. 

Thorold 

During the year the municipality installed a 100-kw., 2,300-volt, 3-phase, 
25-cycle generator to replace the old single-phase, 60-cycle unit. The new 
generator is now being used to suppress the peak on the municipality's system. 
This generator is operated by water power on the old Welland canal, which power 
has been used by the municipality for some years. To provide for this new plant 
and also for extensions to its distribution system, additional debentures to the 
extent of $5,000 were issued by the municipality. 

Wallaceburg 

A contract was entered into with the Dominion Sugar Company for the 
supply of power for the operation of its electric furnaces. Power was formerly 
generated by the company itself by the operation of large gas engines. The 
26,000-volt line from Wallaceburg Junction to Wallaceburg was double circuited 
and an extension was made to the plant of the company. Power was first 
taken by the company on March 1, 1922. 

Wellesley 

Assistance was requested in connection with increasing the capacity of the 
local system. Some extensions were made and the secondary systems enlarged 
and improved. 

York Township 

As a preliminary to taking over the portion of the distribution system of 
the Toronto and Niagara Power Company lying in the township a complete 
inventory and valuation was made of this system. A valuation was also made 
of the distribution lines of the Toronto Suburban Railway system in the 
township. 

Numerous estimates were checked and street lighting and power rates set 
for extensions to the existing distribution system, which belongs to the township 
and is operated for it by the Toronto Hydro-Electric system. 

Zurich 

An investigation of the service to the local flour and chopping mill was 
made. Assistance was also given to the local management during the year. 



132 FIFTEENTH ANNUAL REPORT OF THE No. 49 



NIAGARA SYSTEM— RURAL* 

Beamsville Rural Power District 

As a result of meetings held in Grimsby, Beamsville, Vineland, Jordan 
Station, Campden and Tintern, approximately 300 contracts have been obtained. 
About 50 miles of line is now being constructed to give service to these parties. 
This work involved the construction of a 12,000-volt line from St. Catharines 
to Beamsville and Grimsby, at which points substations are being constructed 
to take care of this load. This district is developing very rapidly, especially 
in small fruit farms and the canning industry. Service will be available early 
in the coming year. 

Belle River Rural Power District 

Public meetings were held in this district in the latter part of 1921 and the 
early part of 1922, and local committees, canvassing in the district after the 
meetings, obtained contracts sufficient to build 16 miles of line to serve 35 farm 
contracts and 72 hamlet contracts. Construction work is proceeding by the 
Commission's staff, and power will be supplied in December of this year from 
the new distributing station which is being constructed at Belle River. 

*NOTE: — In the descriptions of work carried on in the rural districts of the various systems 
there are references to certain classes of rural consumers. These classes of service are described 
as follows: 

Class I: Hamlet service includes service in hamlets, where four or more customers are 
served from one transformer. This class excludes farmers and power users. Service is given 
under three sub-classes as follows. 

1-A: Service to residences where the installation does not exceed six lighting outlets 

or twelve sockets. Use of appliances over 600 watts is not permitted under this class. 

1-B: Service to residences with more than six lighting outlets or twelve sockets, and 

stores. Use of appliances over 750 watts permanently installed is not permitted under 

this class. 

1-G: Service to residences with electric range or permanently installed appliances 

greater than 750 watts. 

Special or Unusual loads will be treated specially. 

Class II-A: House Lighting — Includes all contracts where residences cannot be grouped as 
in^Class I. This class excludes farmers and power users. 

Class II-B: House Lighting — Includes lighting of small farms that cannot be grouped as 
in hamlets. This will include power for miscellaneous small equipment and single-phase 
motors not to exceed 2-horsepower, or an electric range. Range and motor not to be used 
simultaneously. 

Class III: Light Farm Service — Includes lighting of farm buildings, power for mis- 
cellaneous small equipment, power for single-phase motors, not to exceed 3-horsepower demand, 
or electric range. Range and motors are not to be used simultaneously. 

Class IV: Medium Single- Phase Farm Service — Includes lighting of farm buildings 
and power for miscellaneous small equipment, power for single-phase motors, up to 5-horsepower 
demand, or electric range. Range and motor are not to be used simultaneously. 

Class V: Medium 3-Phase Farm Service — Includes lighting of farm buildings and power 
for miscellaneous small equipment, power for 3-phase motors, up to 5-horsepower demand, or 
electric range. Range and motor are not. to be used simultaneously. 

Class VI: Heavy Farm Service — Includes lighting of farm buildings and power for mis- 
cellaneous small equipment, power for motors up to 5-horsepower demand, and electric range, 
or 10-horsepower demand without electric range. 

Class VII: Special Farm Service — Includes lighting of farm buildings, power for mis- 
cellaneous small equipment, power for 3-phase motors from 10- to 20-horsepower demand, and 
electric range. 

Class VIII: Syndicate Outfits — Includes any of the foregoing classes which may join 
in the use of a syndicate outfit, provided the summation of their relative class demand ratings 
is equal to the kilowatt capacity of the syndicate. 



1923 HYDRO-ELECTRIC POWER COMMISSION 133 

Brant Rural Power District 

During the year 7 miles of line was constructed in this district on which 
approximately 80 consumers will receive service. These lines are feeders from 
the present Brantford township system. 

Chatham Rural Power District 

Rural meetings were held in the district in the summer and fall of 1921 
and sufficient contracts obtained to build 23 miles of line to supply 70 farm 
contracts and 24 hamlet contracts. Power was first turned on to these lines 
May 5, 1922, by an extension of the distributing lines of the Chatham Hydro- 
Electric system, power being metered at the city limits. These lines were 
constructed for the Commission by the Chatham Hydro-Electric system, which 
also looks after the operation. Additional contracts are being signed and it is 
expected that at least 10 miles of line will be added to the system during the 
coming year. 

Chippawa Rural Power District 

An underground line was constructed from Chippawa to Stevensville, a 
distance of 8.45 miles, to give service to 59 consumers of class 1, 3 of class 2, 
14 of class 3, and 2 of class 7. This line was made alive on July 11, 1922. A 
request has also been made by the township of Bertie to construct a street light- 
ing system in Stevensville, with 25 100-watt lamps. Operation is. being taken 
care of by Stamford Township system. 

Delaware Rural Power District 

Public meetings were he'ld in this district and assistance was given in 
securing contracts which enabled the Commission to construct 10.5 miles of 
rural line to serve 24 farm and 34 hamlet contracts in the hamlet of Melbourne 
and the rural vicinity. Sufficient contracts have been secured to permit the 
building of a line to Komoka and east on the third concession of Lobo township, 
approximately 8 miles in length. It is expected that the necessary agreement 
will be signed with the township and that this line will be built during 1923. 
The operation of this system is looked after by the Commission. 

Dorchester Rural Power District 

Public meetings were held in this district and assistance was given in securing 
contracts which enabled the Commission to construct 28 miles of line to serve 
121 hamlet and 97 farm contracts. Actual construction was commenced on 
November 1, 1921, and completed on May 1, 1922. Estimates were prepared 
on street lighting for the police village of Belmont. 

Drumbo Rural Power District 

Meetings were held in Drumbo, Princeton, Bright and Wolverton, as a 
result of which 65 contracts have been obtained, 48 of which are consumers of 
class 1, 9 of class 3, and 8 of class 4. In all, 7.05 miles of line were constructed, 
and were made alive on August 10, 1922. 

Exeter Rural Power District 

Meetings were held in the township of Stephen and the cost to serve the 
rural users with electric current on 20-year contracts was fully explained. After 
the necessary contracts were obtained, an investigation into the local conditions 
was made in the field. Arrangements were made to construct a distribution 
system to serve 128 rural consumers, 25 of which were farmers and 103 hamlet 
consumers, during the last half of the year. As street lighting was required 



]J4 FIFTEENTH ANNUAL REPORT OF THE No. 49 

in the township, estimates of the cost and the rates to serve, as well as the pro- 
cedure to be followed as per Part II (a) covering street lighting in townships 
were explained to those interested. After the requirements were carefully 
carried out as per the Act, the street lighting system was installed in Crediton 
and Centralia. Arrangements were made for the operation of the local system 
so that good service could be obtained at as low an expense as possible. 

Gait Rural Power District 

The district was started in North Dumfries township by lines on the east 
and west river road south to Gait approximately three miles in extent, serving 
18 customers. These lines are operated for the Commission by the Gait Public 
Utilities Commission. 

Jordan Rural Power District 

As a result of meetings held in the district, service was given on May 20, 
1922, to 23 hamlet consumers and 1 farm consumer on V/% miles of line. Addi- 
tional farm contracts numbering 24 have been obtained in the district and 
approximately 7 miles of line are being constructed to give service to these 
prospective customers. 

London Rural Power District 

Public meetings were held in this district and assistance was given in 
securing contracts which resulted in the building of 5 miles of line to serve 17 
hamlet and 11 farm contracts. This work was commenced on October 9, 1922, 
and will be completed before the end of November, 1922. It is expected that 
approximately 10 miles of line will be added to this district during 1923. This 
district, in conjunction with the Dorchester Rural Power District, is operated 
by the Hydro-Electric Power Commission, thus keeping the operating costs 
at a minimum. 

London Township — Voted Area 

An investigation was made of the conditions in the Broughdale district to 
take care of extensions to serve additional consumers. Changes were made in 
the primary construction at the Thames River bridge, as requested by the 
Township Council, and the capacity of the primary lines was increased. Esti- 
mates were prepared and arrangements made for the issuing of additional 
debentures by the township to take care of this work. 

Lynden Rural Power District 

An underground line was constructed from Lynden substation to Jerseyville, 
a distance of 5.5 miles, to give service to 21 consumers of class 1, 13 of class 3, 
and 1 of class 4. This line was made alive on February 9, 1922. It is expected 
that during the coming summer, as a result of meetings held in this district, 
a line will be extended north from Lynden to Sheffield, a distance of approximately 
8 miles, to give service to 20 farmers and to 15 hamlet consumers. 

Niagara Rural Power District 

Service was given to this line on January 18, 1922, to 7 consumers of class 3, 
3 of class 4, and 2 of class 7. As a result of meetings held in the district, it is 
expected that lines will be constructed to give service to approximately 25 con- 
sumers of class 3, and 30 hamlet consumers. 






1923 HYDRO-ELECTRIC POWER COMMISSION 135 

Preston Rural Power District 

The original Preston Rural district, which consisted of a line from Preston 
high-tension station to Breslau, has been increased by the acquisition of the 
Blair and Doon systems and by an extension to Freeport and Centreville. 
Sufficient contracts have been received to warrant the extension of the Preston- 
Breslau line to Bridgeport and Bloomingdale. This system now consists of 
15 miles of line serving 140 customers. It is expected that another line will be 
built towards New Germany. When this is completed, the township of Waterloo 
will have Hydro lines practically throughout the entire township. This rural 
district is operated by the Commission, a local superintendent being employed. 

Ridgetown Rural Power District 

Public meetings were held in the district in the years 1920-21 and sufficient 
contracts were obtained to warrant the building of 24 miles of line to serve 
55 farm consumers and 67 hamlet consumers. These lines were constructed 
by the Construction department of the Commission and power turned on to 
the lines on March 10, 1922, by connecting to the Highgate 4,000 volt feeder 
supplied from the Commission's distributing station at Ridgetown. 

Included in this district is the street lighting and distributing system in 
Rondeau Provincial park, the street lighting system consisting of 57 100-watt 
standard street lamps. This part of the district was put in operation in July, 
1922. 

St. Jacobs Rural Power District 

A line has been built from the St. Jacobs station to the village of Conestogo. 
There are at the present time 52 consumers on approximately 3 miles of line. 
This line is operated by the Commission, the superintendent of the Preston 
Rural Power district being employed. 

Saltfleet Rural Power District 

On February 14, 1922, the lines in the Saltfleet rural power district were 
made alive and service is now being given to nearly 600 consumers. This rural 
power district is being operated by the Commission and an operating staff is 
located at Stony Creek. 

Sandwich Rural Power District 

Meetings were held in the years 1921-22 and sufficient contracts were 
obtained to warrant the construction of 5 Y2 miles of line to supply 7 farm contracts 
and 28 hamlet contracts. Construction work was carried on for the Commission 
by the Windsor Hydro-Electric system and the Walkerville Hydro-Electric 
system, power being supplied by each of the respective systems to the lines in 
their vicinity. Power was turned on to these lines in August, 1922. 

Simcoe Rural Power District 

As a result of meetings held in Port Dover, 5 class 3 consumers were attached 
to the Simcoe-Port Dover line. It is expected that during the coming year service 
will be given to a large number of summer cottages west of Port Dover as well 
as to the Regal Poultry Feed Company, who will require approximately 30 
horsepower. During the year rural meetings were held in the townships of 
Stamford, Humberstone, Crowland, Thorold, Pelham, Grantham, Louth, 
Clinton and Woodhouse. 



]36 FIFTEENTH ANNUAL REPORT OF THE No. 49 

Stamford Rural Power District 

During the year a line was constructed from the Stamford Hydro-Electric 
System line westward on Lundy's Lane to serve the hamlets of Allanburg and 
the Beaverboard industrial sub-division, to give service to 123 consumers of 
class 1, 6 of class 3 and 1 of class 2. Approximately 6.5 miles of line was con- 
structed. A request has also been made by the township of Thorold that a street 
lighting system be erected in Allanburg. This system is being operated by the 
Commission by the Stamford township system. 

Tavistock Rural Power District 

Sufficient contracts have been received to warrant the building of rural 
lines from Tavistock to Shakespeare, a distance of 3 miles, to serve 40 customers. 
The construction work has been commenced and it is expected service will be 
given soon. 

Wallaceburg Rural Power District 

Public meetings were held in the years 1921-22, and canvassing for contracts 
undertaken by local committees. Contracts were obtained for 15 miles of line 
for 42 farm contracts and 18 hamlet contracts; also 2 power contracts of 30 
horsepower each for power to two large drainage schemes. Construction work 
was undertaken by the Wallaceburg Hydro-Electric system on behalf of the 
Hydro-Electric Power Commission and it is expected power will be supplied 
early in 1923. 

Welland Rural Power District 

A line approximately one-half mile in length was constructed to give service 
to 38 hamlet consumers and was made alive on April 14, 1922. 

Woodstock Rural Power District 

Public meetings were held in this district and as a result of the efforts of the 
committees appointed at these meetings sufficient contracts were obtained to 
warrant the construction of 56 miles of rural line to serve 152 farmers and 74 
hamlet consumers. Construction was commenced in this district on July 17, 
1922, and it is expected that it will be completed by the end of the year. Eight 
street lights were installed in Innerkip and it is likely that this number will be 
increased during the coming year. The operation of this district is taken care 
of by the Commission, a local superintendent being employed who assists the 
consumer in every way possible. 



ESSEX COUNTY SYSTEM 

Extensions were made to the distributing systems in the towns on this 
system and heavier capacity supplied to take care of additional consumers and 
of the increased use of electricity caused by the more extensive use of domestic 
appliances. 

Additions to the street lighting system were made in the town of Kings- 
ville and preliminary investigations were made and a scheme was submitted 
to the council in Leamington for an ornamental lighting system in the business 
section. 

Changes were made in the distributing system in the town of Essex so that 
primary lines and transformers were taken off the main street in the business 
section. This action greatly improved the appearance of the street. 



1923 HYDRO-ELECTRIC POWER COMMISSION 137 



SEVERN SYSTEM 

As has been customary in the past years, engineering assistance of a general 
nature was rendered to all of the municipalities comprising this system. The 
local officials of the various towns were advised concerning the construction 
of extensions to distributing lines; service to new customers; the application 
of rates; the soliciting of new customers and installations on the premises of 
same; the purchasing of proper types of equipment; and in all matters pertaining 
to detailed operation. The operating statements of each individual system 
were analyzed for the purpose of ascertaining the accuracy of existing rates 
and the revision of such, if necessary. This assistance was given the following 
municipalities: Alliston, Barrie, Beeton, Bradford, Coldwater, Collingwood, 
Cookstown, Creemore, Elmvale, Midland, Penetanguishene, Port McNichol, 
Stayner, Thornton, Tottenham, Victoria Harbour, and Waubaushene. 

The combined demands of the Severn System municipalities having become 
such during the year as to require the entire capacity of the Big Chute generating 
station, additional power plant capacity was found to be necessary to supply 
future demands, and an investigation was made to determine the most feasible 
source of such supply. This investigation involved a study of the possibility 
of increasing the output at the Big Chute plant by replacing the existing units 
with others of greater output; or, the construction of a development at Port 
Severn at the mouth of the Severn river at Georgian bay and operating the 
same in parallel with the Big Chute plant; or, connection to the Muskoka 
system by means of a transmission line between the South Falls generating station 
and Waubaushene or Coldwater — additional power to be obtained by constructing 
an extension to the power house at that location — or, a connection to the Niagara 
system through the Eugenia lines between Mount Forest and Harriston ; or, 
a second pipe line at the Eugenia development. Any one of these possibilities 
would provide for the extra power requirements of the Severn system. The 
merits of these various methods of securing an additional supply of power are 
still being considered, but it is anticipated that a decision will be made a.t once 
and construction undertaken early next year. As a temporary means of providing 
for the power requirements of the district until such time as the permanent 
arrangements have been completed, an agreement for the period of one year 
was executed with the town of Orillia whereby a guarantee of 800 horsepower 
was secured from the town covering the delivery of this amount of power to the 
Big Chute generating station. A meeting was held at Barrie on July 25, at which 
representatives- of all the Severn System municipalities were present, as well 
as several of the Commission's staff, to discuss any and all matters of a general 
nature pertaining to the operation of the system, such as rates, cost of power, 
details of administration, etc. At this meeting an Association was formed to 
be known as "The Association of Municipalities of the Severn System." Officers 
for the coming year for carrying on the work of the Association were elected 
at this meeting. 

Collingwood 

A considerable increase in the demand of this municipality during the year, 
amounting to approximately 30 per cent, over last year, has been obtained, 
and there is every indication that the local system will soon recover from the 
industrial slump which occurred at the close of the War. A new substation 
was provided and equipped by the local Utility with the assistance of the Com- 
mission, for the supply of power to an industry manufacturing electric castings 



138 FIFTEENTH ANNUAL REPORT OF THE No. 49 

for the general trade, three 300-kv-a. transformers were installed by the Com- 
mission for this station. The power is used for the purpose of operating an electric 
furnace. This Company's property was formerly used as a large munition 
plant during the War. The Shipyard and Dry Dock and other large industries 
are also beginning to utilize previously established demands. These loads, 
together with the demands of a new industry recently secured by the town, 
will enable the local system to recover completely the load of previous years. 

Midland 

A contract was executed between the Commission and the Grand Trunk 
Railway of Montreal covering the supply of approximately 1,000 horsepower 
to the company's elevator located in this municipality in the portion known 
as Tiffin. To serve this customer, approximately 2,000 feet of 22,000-volt line 
was constructed, as well as a brick substation equipped with a bank of three 
400-kv-a. transformers together with the necessary switching and protective 
equipment. Arrangements were completed during the year by the local system 
with the assistance of the Commission for serving a large flour mill. This cus- 
tomer is taking about 600 horsepower and is being served at 22,000 volts through 
its own substation. 

SEVERN SYSTEM— RURAL 

Following up the efforts of previous years in connection with rural service 
to various townships served from the Severn system, public meetings were held 
at different locations, committees organized and assistance given to the various 
committees which had previously been appointed. Meetings were held at 
Cookstown and Thornton for Essa township, and at Glencairn, Everett and 
Lisle for Tossorontio township. Additional work was performed in Innisfil 
township and investigations were made covering service at various points 
located within the township boundaries. A meeting was held with the council 
of the township of Medonte and all details in connection with rural service were 
explained, covering service out of Cold water station. Special work was per- 
formed in other townships throughout the system, details of which are given 
throughout this report. 

Flos Township 

Various public meetings were held in this township at Phelpston and Elm- 
vale, especially covering service to rural customers in the hamlet of Phelpston 
and the vicinity, and a canvass of this district resulted in securing approximately 
20 contracts. Estimates and rates were prepared and submitted to the local 
officials. 

Nottawasaga Township 

The rural line out of Collingwood station for serving this township, the 
construction of which was begun last year, was completed during the current 
year and service is now being given to 56 customers. Additional customers 
have been added from time to time throughout the year, and extensions to the 
original line were made at various points. 

Oro Township 

Following up the preliminary work performed in this township during 
past years in connection with rural service, an agreement was executed between 
the township council and the Commission covering general distribution of power 
within the township limits, but more particularly for service to the summer 
resort district in the vicinity of Shanty Bay, 25 individual contracts having 



1923 HYDRO-ELECTRIC POWER COMMISSION 139 

been signed between the township and consumers. Approval covering the 
capital expenditure for this work has already been given and construction of 
the necessary lines for serving the various customers will be undertaken early 
next spring. It is anticipated that a considerable farm load will develop from 
this initial installation. 

Sunnidale Township 
Having obtained an insufficient number of contracts, both at Wasaga 
Beach and in the vicinity of Stayner, it was found impossible to proceed with 
the construction of rural lines in the township during the current year. A 
further canvass has been made, however, and revised estimates prepared, and 
approximately 50 additional contracts secured. A delegation from the district 
discussed details of service with the Commission covering the erection of all 
poles for the Wasaga Beach line. With the revised rates on the basis of this 
tender, there is every indication of the construction of the Wasaga Beach line 
being undertaken early next spring, with service given to approximately 105 
contracts (total number of contracts signed to date). It is also anticipated that 
this number of customers will be increased to approximately 200 as soon as the 
lines are completed and service is. available. Whereas this line will be con- 
structed primarily for serving the summer resort district at Wasaga Beach, 
and whereas all the contracts signed to date cover summer cottages, there is no 
doubt but that a large number of farmers will avail themselves of the oppor- 
tunity of taking power from this line as soon as its construction has been com- 
pleted. 

EUGENIA SYSTEM 

Engineering assistance pertaining to operation in general was given to the 
various municipalities of this system throughout the year. The local officials 
of the individual systems were advised on matters concerning rates, extensions 
to distributing lines, the soliciting of new business, the installation of proper 
types of equipment, and details pertaining thereto. Special attention was given 
to several new towns added to the system last year. The operating statements 
of the various local systems were analyzed to determine the necessity of rate 
revision where such was found to be necessary. This assistance was given to 
the following municipalities: Arthur, Chatsworth, Chesley, Dundalk, Durham, 
Elmwood, Flesherton, Grand Valley, Hanover, Holstein, Kincardine, Lucknow, 
Markdale, Mount Forest, Neustadt, Orangeville, Owen Sound, Priceville, 
Ripley, Shelburne, Tara, Teeswater and Wingham. 

An investigation was made covering the purchase of the system now owned 
by Mr. J. M. Deagle, of Orangeville, including a development located near the 
forks of the Credit river, and serving the villages of Alton and Erin, and part 
of the town of Orangeville. A power survey was made of the district served by 
this company with the idea of ascertaining the possible demands of other muni- 
cipalities in the vicinity, in addition to the demands of the three previously 
mentioned, and also to ascertain the possibilities of serving various industries 
located in the district. After holding various conferences and giving the matter 
very careful consideration, it was decided that it would be impossible for the 
Commission to purchase this system and operate it for the benefit of the various 
municipalities adjacent to the development, as the possible demands for power 
were insufficient to warrant the purchase price plus the capital necessary to 
rebuild and reconstruct the plant. 

A meeting was held at Durham on May 15, at which representatives of 
all the municipalities on the Eugenia system were present, as well as represen- 



MO FIFTEENTH ANNUAL REPORT OF THE No. 49 

tatives of the Commission's staff, to discuss matters pertaining to the cost of 
power and the basis on which such cost was determined, as well as matters 
pertaining to the operation of the development and the transmission of power 
to the various municipalities served by the system. At this meeting an associa- 
tion was formed known as the ' 'Association of the Eugenia System Municipal- 
ities/ ' an executive committee was appointed and officers duly elected for the 
coming year. 

An investigation was made to determine the possibility of securing addi- 
tional power for the Eugenia system, various schemes being considered such as 
the construction of a transmission line between the nearest point on the Niagara 
system at Harriston and Mount Forest, and the installation of a frequency 
changer set at the latter point; the construction of a development on the Saugeen 
river near Port Elgin ; and the construction of a second pipe line at the Eugenia 
plant, bringing the output of same up to 8,000 horsepower. A decision has not 
yet been made concerning these various schemes and the investigation will 
continue until sufficient data is available for the Commission to form conclusions 
as to which one of the three will be adopted. As far as can be ascertained at 
the present time, however, in all probability the second pipe line will be installed 
some time during the coming year. 

Durham 

A new outdoor- type substation was constructed, on property formerly 
owned by the National Portland Cement Company, consisting of three 100-kv-a. 
transformers with the necessary switching and protective equipment for the 
purpose of serving a customer requiring between 300 horsepower and 400 horse- 
power at that location. This industry was started on a small scale two or three 
years ago and has been the means of greatly increasing the power demand of 
the town, and has completely compensated for the loss of the National Portland 
Cement Company's load. 

Meaford 

Revised rates and estimates were prepared and submitted covering delivery 
of hydro-electric power to this municipality. The valuation of the local system 
previously prepared was checked and various meetings were held with the 
town council for the purpose of devising some means of making settlement with 
the local privately-owned system now serving the town, so that same could 
be acquired and the municipality served with Hydro power from the Eugenia 
plant. To serve the town with Hydro power, an extension of the transmission 
lines to Meaford would be required, together with the construction of a stepping- 
down station suitable for delivering the power at distribution voltage. An 
enabling by-law was submitted to the ratepayers qualified to vote thereon at 
the last January elections and was carried by a large majority. A money by-law 
authorizing a debenture issue to cover the purchase of the local system and 
the rebuilding of same will be submitted to the ratepayers at the coming January 
elections. 

Paisley 

Estimates and rates were prepared and submitted covering the delivery 
of Hydro power to this municipality and every possible assistance was rendered 
to the local officials in completing arrangements accordingly. 

It is proposed to construct a 4,000-volt line out of Chesley to Paisley 
capable of serving rural customers desirous of obtaining electrical energy for 
farm purposes. As soon as a sufficient number of contracts are obtained in 
Paisley to guarantee the revenue required to pay the cost of service, a trans- 
mission line will be constructed. 



1923 HYDRO-ELECTRIC POWER COMMISSION 14J 

Walkerton 

Arrangements were completed for serving the Hanover Cement & Stone 
Company's quarry, located near the town of Walkerton, and formerly the prop- 
erty of the Commission. The Commission retained possession of the substation 
for the purpose of making use of it as a distributing centre for rural power 
requirements in the adjacent district as well as to supply power to the company. 

EUGENIA SYSTEM— RURAL 

Following up the work performed in various townships throughout the 
Eugenia system during the past years, assistance was rendered to the various 
townships in the preparation of estimates and rates, the holding of public 
meetings, discussions with various local officials, the formation of committees 
to carry on local investigation and in all matters pertaining to rural service. 
This assistance was given specially to the following townships: Arran, Derby, 
Elderslie, Egremont and Howick. 

Artemesia Township 

Arrangements were made for serving the hamlet of Ceylon by an extension 
of the primary lines out of the village of Flesherton. A new contract, based on 
recent legislation, was executed between the township and the Commission, 
and 16 contracts were executed between individual customers and the township. 
This extension was placed in service on February 23. Arrangements were also 
completed for reconstructing the distributing lines in the hamlet of Eugenia, 
and approval was given covering the necessary capital expenditure for carrying- 
on the work. The reconstruction of these lines will be undertaken early next 
year. 

Brant Township 

The construction of approximately lj^ miles of rural line in this township 
was completed for serving four farms in the vicinity of the Walkerton quarry 
substation and power was first delivered to these customers on February 15, 
1922. 

WASDELLS SYSTEM 

At various times throughout the year engineering assistance and advice 
was given to the municipalities of the Wasdells system, on operating matters, 
on matters pertaining to rates, on extensions to distributing systems, concerning 
service to important individual customers, and in all matters pertaining to manage- 
ment and administration. Operating statements of the various local systems were 
analyzed to determine the necessity of rate revision where required. This 
assistance was given to the following municipalities: Beaverton, Brechin, 
Cannington, Sunderland and Woodville. 

The lines of this system were extended south from Cannington to serve 
the municipalities of Port Perry and Uxbridge and the rural communities 
adjacent thereto, details of which are given elsewhere in this report. 

Port Perry 

A distributing system was designed for this municipality and the recon- 
struction of the existing system was undertaken by the local officials with the 
assistance of the Commission. This municipality receives its service from an 
extension of the Wasdells lines south from Cannington to a substation at Green- 
bank and power was first delivered during the month of October. 



]_42 FIFTEENTH. ANNUAL REPORT OF THE No. 49 

Uxbridge 

A distribution system was constructed in this municipality by the local 
officials with the assistance of the Commission, and arrangements completed 
for receiving power from the extension of the Wasdells system south of Canning- 
ton with a substation at Greenbank. Hydro power was delivered to this munici- 
pality in October and assistance was given to the local officials in various matters 
pertaining to operation under the new conditions. 

WASDELLS SYSTEM— RURAL 

As in previous years considerable work was performed in the rural districts 
adjacent to the Wasdells system and forming a part thereof, such as submitting 
information at public meetings and making explanation to the various township 
councils and farmers interested concerning rates and the method of obtaining 
service. The townships for which this work was performed are as follows: 
Brock, Elgin, Mariposa, Reach, Scott and Thorah. 

Mariposa Township 

Various estimates and rates were prepared and submitted to prospective 
customers in this township and several meetings were held in the district and 
all matters pertaining to rural service carefully explained. It is anticipated 
that in the near future a line will be constructed in this township to serve rural 
customers as well as the villages of Little Britain and Mariposa. 

Reach Township 

A number of contracts were obtained in the hamlet of Greenbank adjacent 
to the substation constructed for the purpose of serving the municipalities of 
Uxbridge and Port Perry. The hamlet of Greenbank and the rural customers 
adjacent thereto will be served from the low- tension lines feeding the above 
mentioned municipalities out of Greenbank station. The approval for the 
government bonus and for the expenditure covering the construction of rural 
lines has been received and the construction work will be undertaken early 
next year. Various estimates and rates were prepared covering service to a 
number of farmers in the township adjacent to the town of Uxbridge and it is 
expected that several of these customers will take advantage of the existing 
low-tension line serving this municipality at the present time and will probably 
become connected during the coming year. 

Thorah Township 

A large summer resort load has been built up in this municipality adjacent 
to the town of Beaverton and operated by the local officials. Several extensions 
were made to the rural lines in this township throughout the year and a large 
number of new services added. At the present time approximately 84 customers 
located in the township outside of the municipality of Beaverton are being 
served from this rural system. 

MUSKOKA SYSTEM 

Engineering assistance and advice was rendered throughout the year to 
the municipalities of Gravenhurst and Huntsville, which receive service from 
this system. The operating statements of the two municipalities were analyzed 
to determine the necessity of rate revision and the equity of existing rates. The 
loads in both municipalities have grown to such an extent that the capacity 



1924 HYDRO-ELECTRIC POWER COMMISSION 143 

of the generating station has been reached and an investigation is in progress 
covering the construction of an extension to the development as well as the con- 
struction of a transmission line connecting the Muskoka system with the Severn 
system. 

ST. LAWRENCE SYSTEM 

Radical changes were made on the system during the year, to provide for 
the growth of load. Changes in the high-tension station at Cornwall were com- 
pleted, increasing the capacity up to 15,000 kv-a. The station is now amply 
large enough to meet a considerable growth in load. During the spring and 
summer of 1922, the transmission lines were altered, so as to enable the system 
to operate at 44,000 volts, and at the end of the year the voltage on the system 
was changed from 26,000 to 44,000 volts. This work required changes in several 
stations, and the construction of a new station at Monisburg to step down the 
power required north of Morrisburg from 44,000 to 26,000 volts. This is the 
only portion of the system now operating at 26,000 volts. 

The Commission contracted during the year with the Eugene Phillips 
Electrical Works, Limited, for a supply of power at Brockville, to operate its 
plant, which was undergoing construction at this point. The contract calls for 
delivery of 1,100 horsepower, which may be increased up to a maximum of 
3,000 horsepower. 

The Cornwall Pulp and Paper Company ceased operations in its plant in 
December, 1921, and has not yet resumed. 

Alexandria 

Assistance was given to this municipality on several occasions, in connection 
with obtaining additional power consumers. The demand for power for this 
system forl922 has increased approximately 60 per cent over the demand taken 
in 1921, due to increased demand of additional power and lighting consumers. 

Apple Hill 

The demand of this police village for 1922 shows an increase of over 200 
per cent over the demand taken in 1921, due to increase in the number of lighting 
consumers and a power load. 

Avonmore 

During the year several meetings were held in the vicinity of Avonmore, 
for the purpose of obtaining the co-operation of rural residents, to link up the 
rural supply with the requirements of the police village, but no results have 
been obtained as yet. Assistance was given the police trustees in obtaining 
contracts for service from residents of the police village, but sufficient contracts 
were not obtained to justify the police trustees in proceeding with the project 
of obtaining a supply of power, without the rural district in this vicinity joining 
in a plan of extending lines to serve it. 

Aultsville 

Both by-laws were carried by the ratepayers of this police village in January, 
1921, and it was proposed to erect a small substation at a point near the village, 
to meet the requirements of the village, and adjacent territory. 

Assistance was given the police trustees in obtaining contracts for service 
from residents of the village, but sufficient contracts were not obtained to ensure 
revenue to meet cost, and consequently further action was deferred. 



144 FIFTEENTH ANNUAL REPORT OF THE No. 49 

Cardinal 

Requests were received from the council of the village for estimates on the 
cost of power and a distribution system. The plan proposed was to supply 
the requirements of this municipality from a substation erected within the village, 
at a point on the existing high-tension line. Estimates on cost of power and 
distribution system were submitted to the municipality, and an engineering 
report was furnished its officials on the value of the present plant. 

Casselman 

In order to obtain the co-operation of the rural district, to link up with this 
municipality, public meetings were held during the year in this rural district, 
but the interest of the rural residents was not obtained, and consequently the 
project of supplying power to the village of Casselman was deferred, as sufficient 
demand could not be obtained in the village itself to warrant an extension from 
Maxville. 

Chesterville 

A large part of the power sold in this municipality is delivered to a Con- 
densed Milk Company, and in spite of the prevailing depression in the marketing 
of such products, the Company's demands for power have maintained. An 
effort is being made to build up a load in the district around the municipality 
and to extend the service to other municipalities east of the village, in order to 
effect a reduction in the cost of delivering the power. 

Finch 

By-laws for supply of Hydro power were submitted to the ratepayers in 
January, 1921, and carried with a large majority. It was proposed to supply 
this village from a low-tension line from Chesterville, and to have the rural 
community along the line receive service. Some work has been done to obtain 
this, and further effort will be made to find an economical way of serving the 
municipality. 

Lancaster 

Assistance was given to the officials of this village in obtaining additional 
consumers on the system, and also in obtaining the interest of rural residents 
in the vicinity to take service from extensions to the Lancaster system. The 
demand of this municipality is about 200 per cent more for 1922 than for 1921. 

Martintown 

The number of lighting consumers has been increased during 1922, but no 
power consumers have contracted for service. The power required by this 
police village has increased about 250 per cent in 1922. 

Maxville 

The demand of this village shows an increase of about 100 per cent over 
the demand for 1921. There was a gradual increase in the number of lighting 
consumers, but no increase in the number of power users during the year. 
Assistance was given to this municipality respecting additional power con- 
sumers. 

Newington 

This municipality passed by-laws for Hydro service in January, 1921, 
and it was proposed to supply the police village from an extension from Finch, 
but no action was taken during the year. 



1923 HYDRO-ELECTRIC POWER COMMISSION 145 

South Lancaster 

A request was received from the police trustees for an estimate on the cost 
of power and a distribution system. Both estimates were submitted, but further 
action was not taken by the trustees on account of the possibility of an insufficient 
number of residents taking service. Arrangements have been completed whereby 
those residents who want service are to be supplied as part of the Martintown 
rural district. 

St. Isadore de Prescott 

By-laws for Hydro power were carried by the ratepayers of this police village 
in January, 1921, but further action was deferred, pending the co-operation 
of the rural residents in extending a line to this municipality and the village of 
Casselman. 

Williamsburg 

The service from the small transformer substation erected to supply this 
municipality has been satisfactory, and an improvement over the preceding 
year, when a serious interruption occurred. 

Winchester 

The demand of this municipality is practically the same as for 1921. There 
was an increase in the number of lighting consumers, but no increase in power 
consumers. 

Winchester Springs 

Further action was deferred concerning a supply of power to this police 
village, pending the decision of the rural residents to enter into the scheme. 
Some preliminary plans were prepared on a scheme to erect a small special 
transformer station Which would serve the village, but would not permit of 
extending service to the adjoining rural community. 

ST. LAWRENCE SYSTEM— RURAL 

During the year preliminary engineering was carried on in established 
rural districts, as well as in rural districts not established. 

Work in the following approved rural districts on the St. Lawrence system 
was taken up : 

Alexandria District 

Public meetings were held in this district in 1921, but no requests were 
received for further information in 1922. 

Apple Hill District 

Several public meetings were held during the year in this district, at which 
a representative from the Commission was present to explain the basis on which 
power is distributed to rural residents. 

Chesterville District 

Rural residents. in this district have been receiving a supply since April, 
1921, and during 1922 there was an extension of the line to supply additional 
farmers. A readjustment of rates was also made, in order to make them conform 
to a scheme now adopted throughout all rural sections. 

Maxville District 

Several public meetings were attended by a representative of the Com- 
mission. 



146 FIFTEENTH ANNUAL REPORT OF THE No. 49 

Prescott District 

This district is now being supplied with power out of Prescott substation 
by the Commission. This district includes the village of Spencerville, in which 
there are 44 consumers, and since the advent of Hydro, a new sash and door 
factory has been erected, which will use about 20 horsepower. A number of 
farmers in the vicinity are now using Hydro power. 

In response to a petition, estimates have been submitted for street lighting 
in Spencerville. 

RIDEAU SYSTEM 

The amount of power taken by the Rideau system has shown a consider- 
able increase during the year 1922. The municipalities of Kemptville and Lanark 
have been added to the system, and the Grenville Crushed Rock Co. has con- 
tracted with the Commission for a supply of power for the next three years. 
The various industrial plants in the other municipalities have maintained their 
loads, and there has been the usual normal increase in the lighting and appliance 
service in all the municipalities on the system. Only a small portion of the power 
required was purchased from the Rideau Power Company. The greater part of 
the load was met by the Commission's plant at High Falls. 

The financial statement of the system reflects the results of this increase 
in the sale of power and the loading of a generating plant. 

Carleton Place 

Improvements have been carried out on the distribution system in Carleton 
Place, and all primary wires and old construction have been removed from the 
main street. Owing to the increasing power load, demand meters have now been 
installed on all power consumers, resulting in a much more efficient check of 
sale of power, particularly in the large woollen mills in this town. 

Grenville Crushed Rock Company 

This company has contracted with the Commission for a maximum of 800 
horsepower for a period of three years. The company has been taking power 
since May, 1922, and is using approximately 600 horsepower at present. This 
plant is closed through the months of the winter season. 

Kemptville 

The village of Kemptville was added to the system during this year, and 
to date has shown most satisfactory results. In addition to a good lighting load, 
the village is selling a considerable amount of power. The village is now enjoying 
a more efficient form of electric service than was ever experienced under old 
conditions, the improvement in street lighting being most marked. 

Lanark 

This village was added to the system during the last month of 1921, and 
has secured 107 consumers, and everything points to a successful year's opera- 
tion. There is only a small demand for power during the day. 

Perth 

The power requirements in Perth have remained steady throughout the 
year. With prevailing rates, the municipality continues to show large surpluses 
in annual operation of the utility. 

Smiths Falls 

The load in this municipality has been increasing. Many new consumers 
have been connected to the system. Considerable economy in the local operation 
of this municipality has been effected during the year. 



1923 HYDRO-ELECTRIC POWER COMMISSION 147 



THUNDER BAY SYSTEM 

The development at Cameron Falls on the Nipigon river, placed in opera- 
tion last year, has given entire satisfaction and has provided ample power for 
the municipality of Port Arthur throughout the year. Advice and assistance 
was rendered to the Local Commission of Port Arthur in connection with serving 
certain large power customers. The load has been growing very rapidly in the 
municipality of Port Arthur and there is every indication that additional capacity 
will be required at the Nipigon development in a short time. Information 
was submitted to various large power customers in the city of Fort William 
concerning Hydro-Electric service from the Nipigon development, and a special 
effort was made to secure new business for the Thunder Bay system in that 
municipality. Negotiations were begun with the Kaministiquia Power Company 
concerning the interchange of power for emergency purposes between the two 
cities, and it is expected that an agreement will be completed for this purpose 
early next year. An illustrated pamphlet entitled "The Nipigon Hydro-Electric 
Power Development Constructed and Operated for the Municipalities of the 
Thunder Bay District by the Hydro-Electric Power Commission of Ontario," 
was prepared by the Commission and distributed. This pamphlet gives a history 
of the inauguration and growth of Hydro power in the Thunder Bay district 
and of the negotiations with the municipalities of Port Arthur and Fort William 
William in connection therewith. It also contains a complete description of 
the Nipigon development and directs attention to the advantages of the Twin 
Cities as a field for manufacturers and others who might contemplate residence 
there. 



OTTAWA SYSTEM 

There is considerable increase in the use of power in the city of Ottawa. 
In anticipating the growth of load, the city of Ottawa asked for a reservation 
of two more blocks of power, of 500 horsepower each, to be delivered in the 
autumn of 1922. Later it was realized that this would not meet its requirements, 
and an additional block was ordered. The municipality is now using approx- 
imately 12,000 horsepower out of the total of 20,000 horsepower reserved under 
the agreement with the Ottawa and Hull Power Company. The increased use 
of electrical energy in the municipality is chiefly due to requirements for domestic 
purposes. At the rate at which the power demand is now being increased, 
it is evident that shortly an additional source of supply will have to be provided. 

Nepean Rural Power District 

This is a rural district supplying the farmers of Nepean township with light 
and power. It was first put into operation in the early part of the year, after 
the construction of several miles of line. Since operation began, a number of 
extensions have been made, until now approximately 100 customers are being 
served from 24 miles of line. The power is delivered to this district by the 
city of Ottawa, from its distribution system. 

A number of additional extensions are anticipated, and efforts are being 
made to extend the lines to serve some neighbouring hamlets and urban munici- 
palities. 



148 FIFTEENTH ANNUAL REPORT OF THE No. 49 



CENTRAL ONTARIO AND TRENT SYSTEM * 

Bath 

Estimates are being prepared for service to the village of Bath by a line 
extension from Napanee substation. 

Bloomfield 

The Bloomfield Milling Company has installed 35 horsepower in motors, 
replacing steam power. 

An extension has been constructed to serve a private line built by six 
farmers residing on the outskirts of the village. 

Bowmanville 

An extension of the local distributing system of two miles was erected to 
serve the summer cottages at Bowmanville-on-the-Lake. In connection with 
this, a three-phase, 2,200-volt submarine cable was laid across the harbour. 

Brighton 

Estimates were submitted for the construction of lines to serve summer 
cottages at the Provincial Government park at PresquTle Point. 

Campbellford 

The pulp mill at Campbellford was reopened on September 11, after a period 
of inactivity due to poor market conditions. The mill is operating at full capacity 
and has orders ahead for some weeks. 

Cobourg 

Estimates were submitted for the installation of ornamental street lighting 
in the business district and the removal of poles and overhead wires from this 
section. 
Water and Gas Departments 

In connection with the installation of permanent paving on certain streets, 
the Commission renewed water and gas services in the streets affected and also 
increased the capacity of mains. 

Havelock 

A 20-horsepower power customer has been secured. 

Lindsay 

The distribution system in the south end of the town is being rebuilt 
and the street lighting system improved. A number of arc lamps are being 
replaced by a larger number of incandescent lamps. The greater proportion 
of this work was completed this season, although the reconstruction will not be 
entirely completed until next year. 
Provincial Plowing Match 

The Commission gave a demonstration of appliances and electrically 
operated farm machinery at the provincial plowing match. This exhibit was 
very popular with visitors. 

Marmora 

The Marmora commission is now selling 18 horsepower on the off-peak 
basis. 

*See footnote on page 43. 



1923 HYDRO-ELECTRIC POWER COMMISSION 149 

Newcastle 

Service was supplied to a number of rural customers by means of branch 
circuits from the 2,200-volt feeder connecting the distribution system in Orono 
with the Newcastle substation. 

Norwood 

The number of lighting consumers has increased from 185 to 215. The 
power load has increased from 20 horsepower to 75 horsepower, with the im- 
mediate prospect of more power load. 

Oshawa 

The Corporation has ordered the installation of 130 additional 100 c.p. 
street lights. It is proposed to operate these lights from pole type regulators. 
Gas Plant 

A new water-gas generating equipment was placed in operation early in 
the year and is operating with marked economy. An extensive programme of 
enlargements and additions to mains was carried out. A highly successful 
publicity campaign has resulted in a large increase in gas consumption. 

Peterboro 

The utilities commission carried out a heavy reconstruction program to 
provide for cooking and appliance loads in the east side of the city. A de- 
benture issue of $60,000 was approved by the Hydro-Electric Power Commission. 

Estimates were submitted on the cost of a new substation to be erected 
on property purchased some time ago by the utilities commission. 
Gas Plant 

New mains were laid on a large number of streets and larger mains were 
installed in other sections where the demand had outgrown the capacity of 
the existing mains. Numerous alterations and betterments were completed 
in the gas plant in order to cope with the steadily increasing output of gas. 

Picton 

The distribution system on Main Street was rebuilt, using western cedar 
poles, and presents a greatly improved appearance. 

Port Hope 

A new pole line was constructed from the substation to the centre of distri- 
bution. Two three-phase, primary circuits were erected on these poles and the 
local circuits are being rearranged so that the large power loads will "be on a 
separate circuit from the lighting. 

Trenton 

A portion of the new ornamental street lighting system was completed. 
The entire system will be completed before January 1, 1923. The lights in- 
stalled are 600 c.p. gas filled, operating at 20 amps, on a series system. The 
standards are cast iron. The total installation consists of 48 lamps. A new 
20-k.w. pole-type regulator has been installed to operate 36 units, the remainder 
being supplied from the existing regulator at the substation. 

Warkworth 

Estimates were prepared and submitted to the police village of Warkworth 
for the supply of 20 horsepower from a step-down station on the high-tension 
line connecting Healey Falls and Trenton. The police village will vote on the 
necessary by-laws early in December. The station, if constructed, will enable 
the Commission to serve a large and prosperous rural district which cannot be 
economically served from any existing station. 



150 FIFTEENTH ANNUAL REPORT OF THE No. 49 



CENTRAL ONTARIO AND TRENT SYSTEM— RURAL 

Rates based on the provisions of the Rural Hydro-Electric Distribution Act 
were sent out to the following townships, following requests from the municipal 
Councils: Loughborough, Portland, Kingston, Ernestown, South Fredericks- 
burg, North Fredericksburg, Belmont, Smith, Seymour and Hungerford. 

Public meetings were held in the following townships: Darlington, Hamil- 
ton, Haldimand, Sidney, Hallowell, Loughborough, Portland, Kingston, Ernes- 
town, Ameliasburg and Seymour. 

At all these meetings committees were formed for canvassing and a large 
number of contracts have since been signed; but in only one case, viz., Kingston 
township, have sufficient contracts been obtained to warrant the construction 
of the lines. In Kingston township a system of about three miles of primary 
line serving the hamlet of Cataraqui and vicinity is now under construction. 

Estimates have been made covering a 44, 000- volt line extension to Harrow- 
smith with provision for a substation at that point and distribution lines at 
6,600 volts to supply neighbouring municipalities, mines and rural consumers. 
Rates have been submitted to all concerned and a canvass of the rural district 
is proceeding. 

NIPISSING SYSTEM 

This system comprises the municipalities of Callander, North Bay and 
Powassan, as well as the small hamlet of Nipissing. The demands for power 
throughout this district have become such that additional development was 
found necessary, in consequence of which arrangements were completed for the 
installation of an additional development at Bingham Chutes. Plans have 
been completed and the approval of the Commission has been obtained for 
making the necessary expenditure and proceeding with the work so as to have 
it completed about the middle of next year. The first unit of the new develop- 
ment will increase the capacity of the Nipissing system by approximately 600 
horsepower. Provision is being made for installing an additional new unit 
of similar capacity when required. The improvements effected by the Com- 
mission by providing increased storage on the watershed of the South river with 
the addition of Bingham Chutes development will enable the Commission to 
supply power to this district without using the North Bay steam plant, conse- 
quently, it has been decided to dismantle this and dispose of the equipment. 
Arrangements were completed for additional extensions to the North Bay 
distributing system and for rebuilding a large portion to take care of the 
increased demand, both for domestic and power customers. The station at 
Callander was enlarged and extended and additional capacity was provided for 
serving energy to an additional power customer. 

NEW ONTARIO DISTRICT 

Considerable assistance was rendered to various municipalities throughout 
this district which have not yet executed an agreement with the Commission 
for hydro-electric service, but which have availed themselves of the advice of 
the Commission in the solution of their various local power problems. Matters 
pertaining to new power developments and the providing of suitable distribution 
systems were given consideration by the Commission and reports made to 
the various municipalities. This work was performed for the municipalities 
of Bruce Mines, Capreol, Massey and Thessalon. 



1923 HYDRO-ELECTRIC POWER COMMISSION 15 



SECTION VII 



ELECTRIC RAILWAYS 

This section of the Fifteenth Annual Report dealing with the activities 
of the Railway department has, for convenience, been divided into four main 
sub-divisions, as follows: 

1. Discussion of certain aspects of procedure in connection with municipal 

Hydro-electric railways. 

2. Record of reports made to municipalities. 

3. Report on work done during the year in connection with railways now 

under operation. 

4. Financial statement and statistics of railways operated by the Com- 

mission. 

GENERAL DISCUSSION 

The Commission believes that a brief statement may profitably be pre- 
sented respecting the electric railways work which has been carried out on behalf 
of municipalities. The presentation of such a statement has been contemplated 
for some time. Owing, however, to numerous and extensive changes in conditions 
affecting the general electric railway situation — some of which conditions 
are still in an unsettled state, — it is impracticable at this date to present 
a statement as full as it may be possible to present on some other occasion. 

First of all, it is desirable to correct a few misapprehensions. During the 
past year or so, a number of charges have been made against the railway activities 
and certain programmes of municipalities in connection with Hydro-electric 
railways. Criticisms, made both from the public platform and through the 
public press, have occasioned a large amount of misunderstanding and confusion 
in the minds of citizens of the Province of Ontario respecting the general opera- 
tions of the Commission with regard to municipal electric railways. These 
criticisms, in a number of instances, have been most unfair, and the Commission 
has been more or less placed on the defensive and frequently has not been in 
a position adequately to correct the misunderstandings which have been created . 

Prominent among the unjustifiable impressions which have been left in the 
mind of the public are those which have been caused by three main misrepre- 
sentations, as follows: 

First: It has been charged that the Commission definitely recommended 
a complete network of electric railway lines for construction throughout the 
Province, — it being represented that 3,500 miles of railway work was planned 
at a cost aggregating $200,000,000. 

Second: It has been charged that the proposed publicly-owned hydro- 
electric railways in many cases would parallel and compete with the publicly- 
owned Canadian National Railways, thereby resulting in financial loss to all 
concerned. 



[52 FIFTEENTH ANNUAL REPORT OF THE No. 49 

Third: It has been charged that the Commission has forced its railway- 
projects upon reluctant municipalities and has even sought to attain this object 
by unwarranted propaganda. 

Such charges cannot be justified as, indeed, will be fully evidenced from the 
following brief discussion: 

First: The statement made to the effect that the Commission had planned 
a provincial-wide railway system aggregating in cost some $200,000,000, has 
time and again been authoritatively denied by the Chairman of the Commission. 
The statement, in some minds, may have originated through attention being 
drawn to the fact that the Commission had received requests from various 
municipalities to make preliminary investigations respecting portions of rail- 
ways — aggregating some 3,500 miles — which some citizens in the municipalities 
had thought might possibly and advantageously be constructed. In whatever 
manner the error has arisen there has been no justification whatsoever for re- 
peating the statement after its erroneous character had once been fully declared. 

The Commission plans and builds electric railways under authority from 
the Government of Ontario. A fuller setting forth of this authority is given later 
in the introduction to the report presenting the reports made to municipalities. 
It is only necessary here to state that until the municipalities through which 
the proposed road is to pass formally request by resolution in Council that the 
Commission investigate and report, no railway is reported upon or investigated 
by the Commission. 

After a report has been requested by, and made to, a municipality, it by no 
means follows that the Commission will recommend the building of the proposed 
road. Recommendation favouring a new project is only made when the facts 
and conditions are found to be favourable for its success, and after a full knowledge 
of the financial responsibility involved has been conveyed to the municipality 
and after its ratepayers have voted in favour of the project. 

As evidence of the conservative policy followed by the Commission it may be 
cited that out of the 3,500 miles of suggested lines upon which reports have been 
requested and surveys made, the Commission has only recommended projects 
embracing a total of 326 miles, about 60 per cent of which mileage is already 
in operation. 

Second: With reference to the charge that the publicly-owned Hydro 
lines will duplicate and compete with the publicly-owned federal lines, it is 
necessary to refer to certain prominent changes in general railway conditions. 

At the end of the Great War, it was found that a new railway situation 
had arisen in the province of Ontario, due to the fact that the Government of 
Canada was compelled to take over the Canadian Northern Railway, with the 
probability of later finding it necessary to take over the Grand Trunk system. 

In acquiring the Canadian Northern Railways, it was found that the pro- 
posed electric railway from Toronto to Bowmanville — already partly constructed 
— would parallel the proposed Toronto North-eastern Railway Again, the 
Canadian Northern Railway system comprised the Toronto Suburban Railway, 
and this would be paralleled by the proposed new Toronto to London line from 
Toronto as far as Guelph. In a similar manner, the proposed Welland-Bridge- 
burg line would serve much of the same territory as the N agara, St. Catharines 
and Toronto Railway, a subsidiary of the Canadian Northern Railway. 

These three lines, as just intimated, were part of the Canadian Northern 
Railway system, which had been acquired by the Dominion Government. 
Owing to the changed status of these railways, it became necessary to consider 
the advisability of having three publicly-owned municipal electric lines paralleling 



1923 HYDRO-ELECTRIC POWER COMMISSION [53 

the three publicly-owned Dominion electric lines. The whole question was 
opened for conference between the Dominion, Provincial and Municipal author- 
ities, and as a solution of the problem, the Dominion Government offered to 
sell the assets of the three electric roads mentioned to the Hydro-Electric Power 
Commission of Ontario, acting on behalf of the municipalities, for a specified 
amount. The offer was conditioned upon the Commission agreeing to make an 
exclusive traffic inter-change with the Canadian National Railways. 

The municipalities interested requested that the Toronto to Port Credit 
section of the proposed line from Toronto to London be united to the proposed 
electric railway from Port Credit to St. Catharines, thus giving a through line 
from Toronto to St. Catharines, connecting at St. Catharines with the Niagara, 
St. Catharines and Toronto railway serving Niagara Falls and other points. 
For the time being, the portion from Port Credit to London of the proposed 
Toronto to London line would be abandoned. 

A new line was also recommended from Hamilton to Gait from which place 
connection would be given to Guelph, Preston, Hespeler, Elmira, Waterloo and 
Kitchener, either by purchase of or by securing running rights over light traffic 
Grand Trunk branch lines. 

The carrying out of these specific proposals involved only a 326-mile system, 
and this constitutes the extent of the systems finally recommended by the 
Commission out of its surveys aggregating 3,500 miles. Approximately 200 
miles of this 326 miles were already constructed and most of the 200 miles 
was in operation. It may here be stated that the proposed project was to be a 
unified system of high-class electric railways giving high speed, frequent service 
with modern equipment and operating with cheap power. The proposed lines 
would serve a populous and prosperous territory adjacent to thriving industries. 
The proposed system would comprise the following: 

Niagara, St. Catharines and Toronto Railway — in operation. 

Toronto Suburban Railway — in operation. 

Toronto Eastern — partly constructed. 

Hamilton, Guelph, Elmira — acquisition, running rights and some new 

construction. 
Toronto, St. Catharines Railway — new construction. 

In giving an option on its proposed roads as above explained, the Dominion 
Government evidently did not entertain any fear that the portion of the lines 
which it was ready to dispose of would be operated in such a manner as to injure 
the federally-owned roads or rob them of desirable business. As a matter of 
fact, and looked at in a broad way, the success of the Canadian National Rail- 
ways is bound up with the general intensive development and growth of the 
territory they traverse. Upon this development and growth the proposed 
electric railways would, in the portion of the country they serve, unquestionably 
exercise a most beneficial influence. 

It may further be explained that prominent trunk-line railway men, both 
throughout the United States and the Dominion of Canada have, on various 
occasions, publicly stated from the platform, through the press, and while under 
judicial examination, that short-haul freight and passenger business, which are 
a particular function of interurban electric railway operation, are handled on 
trunk roads — with lines and equipment primarily designed for long-distance 
traffic — not only at a heavy loss, but with the handicap of congesting their 
through traffic facilities. The recognition of this fact on the part of the 
administration of the Canadian Northern Railways was doubtless a strong 



[54 FIFTEENTH ANNUAL REPORT OF THE No. 49 

influence in deciding the administration to be willing to dispose of the railways 
which they offered to sell. Moreover, it may be added that the federal govern- 
ment was taken into the complete confidence of the Commission in regard to 
all its electric railway plans. The service of an interurban line supplements, 
but does not replace, the service of a heavy trunk line railway. 

The facts just presented are in direct opposition to the charge made that 
the Hydro-Electric Power Commission was planning to enter into competition 
with the Dominion Government railways. 

Third: With regard to the charge that the Commission, by unwarranted 
means, has forced its railway projects upon reluctant municipalities, it may be 
stated that a charge such as this could only be made by those who willingly 
disregard the facts. 

In the first place, the original legislation of 1913 under which the Commission 
was empowered to investigate, plan and build electric railways, resulted from 
specific request made by the largest deputation of municipal representatives 
that ever appeared before the provincial Government. In 1914, by request of 
a similar deputation, the Act of 1913 was revised. Up to the end of 1914, 
resolutions had been received from more than 200 municipalities asking for reports 
on electric lines, and to date resolutions have been received from an additional 
300 municipalities. 

Assuredly, in the face of such facts, it must be acknowledged that the whole 
railway policy of the Commission is the result of a clearly and definitely expressed 
public opinion demanding that the local transportation system of the Province 
of Ontario be improved, and that all such improvements and operation of 
electric railways must be in the hands of a public Commission such as the Hydro. 

With respect to the question of propaganda, it is only necessary to state 
that inasmuch as many of the railway proposals under examination involved 
technical problems and other considerations which were not readily under- 
standable by many of the citizens interested, it became necessary for some of 
the Commission's engineers to be present at public meetings and in other ways 
to explain the plans and estimates, and also to be prepared to answer questions 
and furnish such supplementary information as local circumstances demanded. 
The officers of the Commission, whenever so requested, have always rendered 
similar service in the general public interest upon all matters entrusted to the 
administration of the Commission. 

Representative charges, as commonly made, have now been dealt with. 
Much more might be said if detailed refutation were attempted but it is believed 
that sufficient has been said to demonstrate that no justifiable foundation can 
be found for the charges which have been made. 

The Hydro-Electric Power Commission has believed that the municipal 
hydro-radial project could have been advanced with caution and yet with 
great benefit to the province as a whole. From its commencement, however, 
the whole project has been subjected to a very great deal of unfair misrepre- 
sentation. It is unnecessary here to enter into a discussion of the aggressive 
opposition involving a consideration of some of the more technical aspects of 
the radial railway programme originally proposed by the Hydro-Electric Power 
Commission. Questions such as the essential difference between trunk steam 
railway operation and electric railway operation; capital costs of high-grade 
electric railways such as the Commission proposed to construct; operating 
costs; possible revenues from local, suburban and interurban passenger and 
freight traffic; the earning power of electric railways already in operation, and 
many other features have already been discussed in a Report entitled " Statement 



1923 HYDRO-ELECTRIC POWER COMMISSION [55 

respecting Findings and other Statements contained in Majority Report of the 
Commission — known as the "Sutherland Commission" — appointed to inquire 
into the subject of Hydro-Electric Railways" which was issued by Sir Adam 
Beck on the 10th of February, 1922. A copy of this Statement will be found on 
file in government libraries, also in all the public and leading institutional libraries 
of the Province, thus affording the opportunity for further reference by those 
interested in the discussion which has centred in the more technical aspects 
of the proposed hydro-radial programme. 

REPORTS MADE ON ELECTRIC RAILWAYS 

It has already been stated that upon receiving authoritative request from 
a municipality, the Commission may examine into and prepare a report upon any 
specific railway project that may be urged by a municipality or municipalities 
as of possible general benefit to the communities concerned. 

Before presenting brief summaries of the reports that have been made, 
it is desired to make clear how it is that the Hydro-Electric Power Commission 
has been acting in the matter of electric railway building, because it has been 
stated that the Commission has been prosecuting this work without proper 
authority. 

It has been recognized that for many years local transportation in Ontario 
was far from satisfactory, and the problem of providing adequate transportation 
facilities between adjacent large centres and, in conjunction therewith, of meeting 
the transportation needs of smaller towns and of the more densely populated 
rural areas, has induced public-spirited men in many communities to seek a 
remedy. That there is a positive need for improved facilities for the interchange 
of commodities is evidenced by the fact that in Ontario farm produce is frequently 
allowed to decay on the farm, while the urban populations are paying high prices 
for similar goods. The prosperity of both city and country depends upon the 
unhampered interchange of commodities, and both farm and city dwellers should 
have rapid and frequent access to each other's domain. 

The citizens of Ontario had before them the demonstrated success of their 
municipally-owned Hydro undertaking, in supplying the people of Ontario 
with electrical power and light "at cost," and all communities recognized that 
these benefits were actual and had resulted from the co-operative effort of all 
concerned. It was logical, therefore, for municipalities to enquire whether it 
would not be possible to build and operate electric railways on a plan correspond- 
ing to the Hydro undertaking. 

All over the continent examples were found where a single organization 
was operating both power utilities and electric railroads with general benefit 
to both, and it was concluded, therefore, that it should be feasible to place 
under the administration of the successful Hydro Commission the operation 
of such electric railways as might first be started in connection with a programme 
for increased and improved electric railway transportation. 

With this plan in mind, municipalities requested the provincial Govern- 
ment to empower them to construct and operate electric railways after such 
projects had been favourably reported upon by the Hydro-Electric Power 
Commission of Ontario. 

In 1913, the Hydro-Electric Railway Act was passed by the provincial 
legislature. Almost immediately following the enactment of this legislation, 
numerous resolutions began to come in to the Commission from municipalities 
asking for reports upon various electric railway projects. In 1914, at the 



156 FIFTEENTH ANNUAL REPORT OF THE No. 49 

request of the municipalities concerned, the Act was revised so as to provide 
that the Commission only could construct and operate the railways. 

The work was to be financed by the municipalities issuing their own deben- 
tures. These were to be placed with the Hydro-Electric Power Commission, 
which, in turn, would issue its bonds to the public, employing the municipal 
debentures as collateral security. After the electric railway programme was 
first started, various provincial governments expressed a willingness — under 
the Hydro-Electric Railway Act — to guarantee the bonds of the municipalities. 
As a consequence, the municipalities naturally felt justified in proceeding upon 
this basis, believing that the Government was not unsympathetic towards the 
efforts being made and was willing to strengthen the hands of the municipalities 
by guaranteeing their bonds. 

The policy of the present Government has not followed the line laid down 
by former administrations under which the electric railway programme was 
initiated. In 1922, a new Act — The Municipal Electric Railway Act — was passed, 
repealing the Hydro-Electric Railway Act and cancelling all the radial railway 
agreements which had been consummated. This new Act, however, exempted 
the railways which were already being operated by the Commission, namely: 
Essex District Railway and the Guelph Radial Railway, and certain other 
proposed railways. The Toronto Suburban and the Toronto and York Railways 
were covered by special Acts. The new Act required the municipalities interested 
in the proposed Toronto -St. Catharines Railway to re-affirm their position in 
regard to the completion of this line. To date 17 of the 20 interested munici- 
palities have passed the required resolutions asking that the road be gone on 
with. The Niagara, St. Catharines and Toronto Railway was also exempted 
and may still at some future date be acquired under the old Act. 



REPORTS MADE 

Toronto -Markham Railway 

This report, made in 1914, recommended, as a self-sustaining undertaking, 
a hundred-mile railway from Toronto eastward through Markham and Stouffville 
to Newmarket, Uxbridge, Port Perry and Whitby. It was made in response 
to municipal resolutions and on the authority of the Government. The line 
was estimated to cost $3,159,234. It was approved by the electors in 1914, 
and sanctioned by legislation in 1915, but the agreements were all cancelled 
by The Municipal Electric Railway Act of 1922. 

Ontario West Shore Railway 

In accordance with the requests of municipalities interested, and with 
Government approval, a report was made on this road in 1914. It was partially 
built by a private company the bonds of which were guaranteed by the munici- 
palities through which the line ran, but the company failed before the work 
was finished. The Commission found that there was insufficient traffic to war- 
rant the completion of the line and so informed the municipalities. In 1917 
further study was made, with the same result, and the Commission recom- 
mended that no more action should be taken on the line. The material on hand 
was then offered for sale. 



1923 HYDRO-ELECTRIC POWER COMMISSION L>7 

Aylmer District Railways 

A report on several alternative lines in the St. Thomas-Aylmer-Tillsonburg 
district was made to the municipalities at their request in 1914. As the estimates 
showed that the lines could not be self-sustaining, the Commission recommended 
against their construction and nothing further has been done in the matter. 

Gravenhurst-Baysville Railway 

Reports were made to the municipalities on a line through this district 
in 1916 and 1917, both of which recommended against the construction of the 
line due to lack of traffic. No further action has been taken. 

Minden District Railway 

The municipalities in this district requested a report on a line from Kin- 
mount Junction to Minden. This was presented in 1917 and recommended 
against the construction of the line as it was estimated that it would not be 
self-sustaining. No further action is contemplated. 

Toronto-London Railway 

A report on this railway was requested by the municipalities along the 
route, in 1914 and 1915. On the authority of the usual Order-in-Council the 
report was made in the fall of 1915, recommending the construction and equip- 
ping of a 137-mile line from Toronto through Port Credit, Milton, Guelph, 
Kitchener, Stratford, and St. Marys, to London, at a total cost of $13,734,155. 
Agreements and by-laws were prepared and were carried by the electors of 
23 of the 31 interested municipalities. The agreements were ratified by Act 
in 1916. 

The 1916 Act specified that actual construction should not be undertaken 
until the conclusion of the war, so that nothing further was done until 1919. 
In the interim the Dominion Government had taken over the Toronto Suburban 
which practically paralleled the new line authorized by the electors. The Do- 
minion Cabinet, however, gave the Hydro an option on the Toronto Suburban 
Railway on behalf of the municipalities, which action would avoid the necessity 
of raising funds for the new line, which would to a great extent duplicate the 
service given by the existing electric railway. 

The acquisition of the existing Toronto Suburban Railway would not, 
however, take care of the requirements of the district between Toronto and Port 
Credit where an improvement in service was urgently required. The conditions 
were fully explained to the Government and to the municipalities affected, 
whereupon resolutions were passed by all the councils requesting the Govern- 
ment to authorize the construction of their section of the Toronto-London 
line as a part of the Port Credit-Hamilton-St. Catharines Railway, which, 
in the meanwhile, had been definitely authorized, and for which bonds had been 
issued. The Government then in power agreed to bring in legislation validating 
such action. 

The new 1922 Municipal Electric Railway Act did not cancel the agree- 
ments of the six municipalities in the section of the Toronto-London line between 
Toronto and Port Credit, but authorized the municipalities to proceed with 
that section provided the councils or the electors reaffirmed the original agree- 
ments. Resolutions have been passed by the councils of all six municipalities 



]J8 FIFTEENTH ANNUAL REPORT OF THE No. 49 

which means that these original agreements and debentures, that have been 
deposited with the Commission, are still legal and binding. 

The original agreement voted on by the electors of the city of Toronto 
in January, 1916, and reaffirmed by the Council in July, 1922, specified that the 
route of the railway should extend westerly from the foot of Yonge Street to 
Sunnyside, "using Harbour Board property and private right of way wherever 
possible." It was therefore necessary to prepare a formal agreement to provide 
for the transfer of various lands from the city of Toronto to the Commission. 
Meetings were held with the various interested bodies and after an extended 
discussion a special agreement was prepared and authorized by the city council 
of Toronto. 

Port Credit-St. Catharines Railway 

Resolutions requesting a report on a railway through the Toronto-Hamilton- 
Niagara district were received in 1915 and 1916. A report was presented to the 
municipalities in 1916, recommending the construction of a railway from St. 
Catharines through Hamilton to Port Credit to connect with the proposed 
Toronto-London line at Port Credit. It was estimated that the cost of con- 
structing and equipping this line, which was about 60 miles in length, would be 
$11,360,363. By-laws and agreements were prepared, sanctioned by Order-in- 
Council, and carried by the electors in 1916 and 1919 in fifteen of the seventeen 
interested municipalities. As authorized by the Act, the fifteen municipalities 
agreed by resolutions to assume the share of the two which had not carried their 
by-laws. An order-in-council authorizing the construction of the line and 
guaranteeing the Commission's bonds to the above amount was passed on 
August 8, 1919. Approximately $500,000 had been spent on right-of-way, 
etc., by the first of July, 1920, when all further commitments were held up 
pending the report of an investigating Commission. 

The new 1922 Act exempted this line from its provisions and permitted 
that it be proceeded with under the old Act on condition that the municipalities 
reaffirm their desire to go on with the work. To the present date nine of the 
fifteen municipalities have passed the necessary resolutions and the electors in 
the remaining six will vote at the coming municipal elections. 

Essex District Railways 

This railway system extends from Tecumseh through Windsor, Sandwich 
and other towns to Amherstburg, and previous to its purchase by the Commission 
was operated by the Detroit United Railway. Owing to the many separate 
franchises great difficulties were encountered by the municipalities in arranging 
with the company for extensions and betterments. As early as 1915 the Com- 
mission's engineers visited Windsor at the request of the city council to assist 
in various proposals then under consideration. Again in 1917, on requests 
of the various councils, a valuation of the property was made but the company 
was not prepared to sell until the expiration of its franchise. In 1918, by vote 
of the ratepayers, the Commission was again requested to report on the proposed 
purchase of the line. A report was made early the following year but as the 
company was still unwilling to dispose of its holding nothing further was done 
at the time. 

Later in the year further resolutions were passed by the councils asking 
the Commission to continue active negotiations with the company. This was 
done and the company finally agreed to negotiate. After the matter was 



1923 HYDRO-ELECTRIC POWER COMMISSION [59 

thoroughly gone into it was found that a satisfactory agreement could not be 
made and the municipalities were so informed. Previous to this time a by-law 
permitting the company to increase fares had been defeated and the company 
stated they were unable to grant a wage increase demanded by their employees. 
The men went on strike and after some days without service, the Ontario Rail- 
way Board operated the road and granted the increases, the road being returned 
to the company about two weeks later. 

Negotiations for the purchase of the road were re-opened shortly after 
this time and a satisfactory option was finally secured. By-laws and agree- 
ments were at once prepared, were sanctioned by the Government on October 
16, 1919, and were submitted to the electors on December 6, 1919. Eight of 
the nine municipalities interested carried their by-laws and immediately agreed 
to assume the share of the township which had defeated the by-law. In 1920 
the agreements were ratified by Act, and the Government, by order-in-council 
dated January 27, 1920, authorized the taking over of the road and guaranteed 
the Commission's bonds to the extent of $2,100,000. 

The transfer was made on April 1, 1920, and the Commission has since 
operated the road. 

The amount passed upon by the electors, which was $2,100,000, included, 
in addition to the purchase price, a small sum for badly needed immediate 
betterments only, as it was thought inadvisable to delay the taking over of the 
road until a complete study was made of the requirements of the system. Dur- 
ing the winter of 1920 and 1921 a survey of the entire property was made to 
determine what further improvements could be recommended arid a programme 
calling for an expenditure of $900,000 was advised. This was approved by the 
municipalities and additional bonds to that amount were guaranteed by the 
Government on September 13, 1921. The betterments that were undertaken 
during the current year will be found under subdivision (3) and statistics of 
operation under subdivision (4). 

Toronto Eastern Railway 

Requisitions were received in 1919 from the municipalities along the un- 
completed Toronto Eastern Railway from Toronto to Bowmanville, a distance 
of about 44 miles, asking that the Commission make a report on the acquisition 
and completion of this railway on behalf of the municipalities. The order-in- 
council authorizing this report was issued and a report was made recommending 
that the road be purchased and completed as it was found that it would be a 
self-sustaining utility. It was to cost completely equipped $8,360,794. All 
the municipalities interested passed their by-laws and the agreements were 
validated by Act in 1920. Further proceedings were halted at this point 
pending the report of an investigating commission and the 1922 Radial Act 
cancelled all the agreements. 

Hamilton, Guelph and Elmira Railway 

After resolutions had been received from the municipalities in this district 
and on the authority of order-in-council, a report was made recommending that 
a new line be constructed from Hamilton to Gait and that purchase or running 
rights be obtained over the Grand Trunk Railway Branch Lines connecting 
Gait, Preston, Hespeler, Elmira, Kitchener and Waterloo, a total distance of 
about 80 miles. The construction and equipment costs were estimated to be 



^60 FIFTEENTH ANNUAL REPORT OF THE No. 49 

$6,170,072. Thirteen of the fourteen municipalities voting carried their by-laws 
and three did not vote. Nothing further was done on this line pending the report 
of an investigating commission. The agreements authorized by the electors 
in the thirteen municipalities were cancelled by the 1922 Act. 

Niagara Falls Street Railway 

This report was made to the city of Niagara Falls in March, 1920, and 
indicated that it would be impossible to purchase this property and operate it 
on a self-sustaining basis, but it could be run at a profit if operated as a part 
of the Niagara Central System. This line is owned by the Canadian National 
Railways, forming a part of the Niagara, St. Catharines and Toronto Railway, 
and is subject to the option held on that line by the Commission. No further 
action has been taken since the report was presented. 

Niagara, St. Catharines and Toronto Railway 

Municipalities of the Niagara district forwarded resolutions from 1914 
to 1916 asking for a report on a line from Welland to Niagara frontier. The 
Government by order-in-council of August 31, 1916, authorized the preparation 
of the report which was presented to the municipalities late in the same year. 
It recommended the construction of a line from Welland through Port Colborne 
to Bridgeburg. It was estimated that the revenue would meet all charges and 
was to cost $2,208,716. Agreements were prepared and sanctioned by order-in- 
council dated September 28, 1916, and voting took place on January 1, 1917. 
All municipalities interested carried their by-laws. The agreements were 
ratified by Act in 1919. During the period following the voting, however, the 
Dominion Government, as stated above, became the owners of the N.S. & T. Ry. 
which paralleled the proposed line for a great portion of its length. The Com- 
mission therefore recommended that the new construction should be withheld 
pending conference with the Dominion Government as to the best procedure 
under the new conditions. 

In 1920 resolutions were received from all municipalities on the N.S. & T. Ry. 
asking that a report be made on the acquisition of that line in their behalf. 
Resolutions were again forwarded by the municipal representatives in 1921. 
Previous estimates were then revised to date and a report prepared which 
recommended the taking over of this line as a paying proposition at a cost of 
$4,663,830. This included, in addition to the purchase price, a sum for better- 
ments and improvements. The report was approved by the municipalities 
and voted on in January, 1922. Nine of the fourteen municipalities voting 
carried their by-laws. The agreements so authorized have not been cancelled 
by the 1922 Act. 

Chatham, Wallaceburg and Lake Erie Railway 

Resolutions were received in 1920 from the municipalities served by this 
railway requesting a report as to whether it would be advisable that this railway 
be acquired on their behalf. After authority had been granted by order-in- 
council of April, 1921, information was collected and the report was prepared and 
considered by the Commission, but no recommendation has yet been made to 
the municipalities. 



1923 HYDRO-ELECTRIC POWER COMMISSION 161 

Guelph Radial Railway 

In response to a resolution of the Guelph city council passed in September, 
1919, the Commission made an investigation of the operation of this railway, 
and reports were submitted to the city on two propositions — one assuming the 
incorporation of the existing railway as a part of the Hamilton, Guelph and 
Elmira Railway, and a second on the basis of an independent railway. Both 
proposals were favorably voted upon by the electors. When action on the 
Hamilton, Guelph and Elmira Railway was held up in July, 1920, the city of 
Guelph requested the Commission and the provincial Government to permit 
the Commission to take over and operate the railway as a separate unit, as 
covered by the second above described proposition. The Government, however, 
ordered the project to be re-submitted to the electors before the transfer could 
be made. A new agreement was prepared providing for a sum of $300,000, 
and was accepted by the electors at the annual elections, January, 1921. It 
was ratified by special Act in the same year, and the road was transferred to 
the Commission's management on May 1, 1921. 

Toronto Suburban Railway 

A resolution was received in 1921 from the city of Toronto requesting a 
report on this railway. A report was made recommending its purchase at a 
cost of $2,778,000, which sum included an amount for betterments. By-laws 
and agreements were approved as authorized by the Toronto Suburban Railway 
Act, 1921, and were favorably voted on by the electors, January 1, 1922. The 
Dominion Government has given an option on the line on the basis that it will 
be a feeder to its trunk line railway. Details of the transfer are now being 
discussed. 

REPORT ON WORK DONE DURING THE YEAR 

Essex District Railways 
Equipment 

A Jarge number of the two-man cars in the city service have been replaced 
by seventeen one-man, safety cars built according to the Commission's own 
plans and specifications. After considerable time and study had been given to 
a consideration as to the best type of car to be used, it was finally decided to 
provide double doors instead of the usual single-door design. The aisles were 
also made wider, and heavier motors, more comfortable seats and better heating 
were installed than had been used on similar cars in other cities. These cars 
are, of course, equipped with the usual automatic safety devices by which power 
is cut off, brakes applied and doors unlatched in the event of the operator re- 
moving his hand from the controller handle, through illness, negligence or for 
any other reason. The best possible fittings and equipment have been used 
and the cars represent the latest development of this type of rolling stock on 
the continent. 

Service was given to certain districts of Windsor and Walkerville from 
which the traffic at present does not warrant the construction of rail lines, by 
four trolley buses operating on two routes. The buses also are the latest develop- 
ment of their kind and have several new features heretofore not used. The 
operation has been entirely successful up to the present time and has been re- 
marked upon and inspected by electric railway operators from various sections 
of Canada and the United States. 

6 H.C. 



J62 FIFTEENTH ANNUAL REPORT OF THE No. 49 

Late in the year it was decided to purchase a motor express car and trailer 
to take care of the rapidly increasing freight and express traffic in this territory. 
Several offers are now receiving consideration and it is expected to have the new 
cars in service early in the new year. 

For special heavy passenger service in Windsor and Walkerville, four 
double- truck safety cars have been ordered. These are now under construction 
and have been designed to facilitate rapid loading and unloading. They are 
to be equipped with all the latest automatic safety devices and may be operated 
either by one or by two men as the traffic demands. They will be delivered 
in 1923. 

A new rotary substation at Petrimoux Corners on the Amherstburg line 
was put into operation during the year. The equipment is housed in a temporary 
galvanized iron structure as it was felt that the traffic developments in this 
section during the next few years will require further adjustment of the power 
supply. Previous to the opening of this station, all the power was supplied 
from the Salt Block station on Sandwich street, Windsor, and a booster was 
used for the Amherstburg line. Under these conditions about half of the energy 
supplied by the booster was dissipated in resistance on the trolley wire between 
Windsor and Amherstburg which resulted in most inefficient operation and low 
speeds. This condition has been rectified by the new station. 

Track, Roadway and Buildings 

During the year further rehabilitation and improvements were made to 
these facilities, as follows: — 

The Ferry street loop, started last year, has been completed. 

On Wyandotte street the old double track between Moy avenue and the 
easterly limits of the city of Windsor has been reconstructed using 56-lb. relay 
rails with creosoted ties on a 6-inch concrete base and plain concrete paving 
surface. On the remainder of the unreconstructed track on this street all joints 
have been lifted and the fish plates welded. 

On London street repairs to the pavement were carried out. 

Reconstruction on Ouellette avenue between Pine street and Sheppard 
avenue included installation of 85-lb. relay rail and tie plates taken from the 
Niagara development work. These were supported on creosoted ties and 
crushed stone ballast with a macadam paving surface. 

From Sheppard avenue to Tecumseh road joints were repaired in a similar 
manner to those on Wyandotte street. 

Steel combination light and trolley poles have been erected on Wyandotte 
street east to the city limits and on Ouellette avenue from Erie street north to 
Sandwich street. Some necessary changes were made in alignment on Welling- 
ton avenue when this street was paved and the track was resurfaced. 

In Ford city the "Y" at the corner of Strabane avenue and Ottawa street 
was shifted and lowered so as to conform to the changes made last season in 
the Ottawa street tracks, and the Strabane avenue-Ottawa street curve relaid 
with 85-lb. rail on creosoted ties, the municipality having in both cases supplied 
an 8-inch concrete paving base. Between these points where Strabane avenue 
is being paved on either side of the track allowance, reconstruction has been 
carried out with 56-lb. relay rail, about 50 per cent, of the ties being renewed 
and the line resurfaced with rock ballast. 

On London street, Sandwich, 500 feet of double track was replaced with 
56-lb. rail and creosoted ties on crushed rock ballast and finished off with a 
tarvia pavement. 



1923 HYDRO-ELECTRIC POWER COMMISSION 163 

Private industrial spurs have been constructed on River street, and into 
the properties of V. Benoit, Windsor, V. Mayrand, and the Martinette Realties 
Company on the Amherstburg division, and an interchange with the Essex 
Terminal railway was installed near the southerly limit of Ojibway. Increased 
yard capacity at the car barns was effected by purchase of additional land and 
extensions of trackage. 

Considerable improvement has been effected throughout various portions 
of the interurban lines. A 6-inch lift of ballast was given to one mile on the 
Tecumseh division and one and one-half miles on the Amherstburg division, 
and weeds were removed from the remainder throughout. Some 9,000 ties 
have been replaced and some other necessary betterments made to the track. 

Seven new. shelters were erected and the old ones repaired and repainted. 
An additional steel span was erected over the Canard river and repairs made 
to other bridge structures. The new sub-station at Petrimoux Corners has 
been completed and alterations to the feeder system made to conform thereto. 
Up-to-date telephones and telephone boxes have replaced obsolete equipment. 

Generally, the whole of the Essex district with the exception of the tracks 
on Sandwich street and on the Walker road route has been placed in first-class 
operating condition. 

Operation 

The Commission is pleased to report that the rehabilitation of the property 
to place it in fair operating condition is now completed and that the most pressing 
of the improvements required for reasonable operation have also been placed 
in service. The district served is growing so rapidly that more cars must be 
secured immediately and additional double track with some extensions must 
also be provided if the traffic offered is to be satisfactorily handled. A pro- 
gramme of suggested improvements is now being prepared and will be submitted 
to the municipalities for approval early in the new year. 

The financial statements showing the balance sheet as of October 31, 1922, 
and the operating figures for the current fiscal year, will be found in the next 
subdivision of this section of the Commission's report. 

The balance sheet shown, refers to the Sandwich, Windsor and Amherstburg 
Railway as the books must be kept in the name of that Company until all the 
outstanding bonds issued by the old Company are retired in September, 1927. 
The Commission's bonds for an equal amount are meanwhile in the hands of a 
Trust Company and are only delivered to the owners of the former Company 
as the old bonds are retired by them. 

The investment of the municipalities in the railway is now made up as 
follows : 

(1) Purchase price and allowance for imperative repairs at 

date of acquisition $2,100,000 

(2) Rehabilitation and improvements as authorized by 
municipalities in 1921 .• 900,000 



$3,000,000 



Some $2,000,000 of the above capital is in the form of 4J/£ per cent, 40-year 
bonds used to purchase the property. This amount is equivalent to approxi- 
mately $1,500,000 on the basis of 6 per cent bonds so that the investment to 
date in ready money is about $2,500,000. 



164 FIFTEENTH ANNUAL REPORT OF THE No. 49 

It has been asserted that the Commission paid about $400,000 more than 
the depreciated value of the property at the time purchased. Those making 
such a statement have forgotten to take into consideration the fact that the 
purchase bonds were based on 4^ per cent money whose face value at 6 per 
cent was only some $1,500,000. The Commission's depreciated valuation was 
approximately $1,650,000, i.e. slightly more than the purchase price. The 
Commission estimates that the actual physical value of the property is at least 
equal to or greater than the value of the outstanding bonds and that the net 
return from operation in the future will be sufficient to meet all operating and 
capital charges. 

A statement that has been made that the line is over capitalized, does not 
bear investigating. In 1919 the capitalization was approximately $2,000,000 
and the gross earnings of the line in that year were $377,000, while in 1922 the 
capitalization stood at approximately $3,000,000 and the gross revenue was 
over $570,000 so that the ratio of capital investment, as compared with the 
earning capacity, is considerably in favour of the 1922 condition. 

The operating statement for the current year is technically correct, but 
it cannot be used as a guide for future years. The revenue was seriously affected 
by the more or less disorganization of service that occurred while the property 
was being rehabilitated and improved and by the inability to maintain a regular 
service with some of the older cars. The repairs to track and equipment have 
been practically completed and the most run-down of the cars replaced by those 
of a more modern and efficient type, thus it is reasonable to anticipate an in- 
crease in revenue for the coming year. 

The operating expenses were adversely affected by the same conditions 
as the revenue only to a greater degree. It is impossible to record the difficulties 
that faced the operating staff in maintaining even the semblance of regular 
service with the dilapidated condition of track and equipment but it is hoped 
these difficult conditions are past and that the service may continuously be 
improved. 

At this stage it may not be out of place to add a few words as to the stand 
the Commission has taken regarding a reserve fund for depreciation. The 
Accounting department, without a specific ruling from the Commission, com- 
menced setting aside monthly amounts for depreciation from the date of pur- 
chase. The Commission has recommended that depreciation charges should 
be set aside for the utilities which it operates but when the returns from operation 
after completion of the rehabilitation programme were available and indicated 
that this work had seriously affected the net revenue, it was decided that it 
would be equitable to defer the depreciation charges until the property was 
placed in satisfactory working condition. It is now the intention to charge 
depreciation each month dating from November 1, 1922. 

Before leaving this subject it might be well to point out that the Hydro- 
Electric Railway Act under which the Essex District Railways are operated 
does not call for the Commission to set aside a reserve fund for depreciation. 
Clause I (0 of the agreement between the municipalities and the Commission 
also makes it clear that depreciation should only be provided out of any surplus 
remaining after all other charges have been met. It is apparent that it is equit- 
able to postpone the depreciation charges during the reconstruction period 
that is estimated to have been completed on November 1, 1922. 

The operating statement for the year, shown in the next subdivision of 
this report, indicates a net deficit of $4,385. This deficit was largely caused 
by the increase in interest charges to cover the new capital used for repairs and 



1923 HYDRO-ELECTRIC POWER COMMISSION 165 

improvements from which full returns were not secured until all had been placed 
in service and properly co-ordinated towards the end of the year. It should 
be noted that the deficit of $4,385 is, after all, a relatively insignificant amount, 
— a fact which will be clear when it is realized that an increase in revenue of 
only one per cent or a decrease in expenses of the same amount would have 
entirely wiped out this deficit. 

It is believed that much useful information can be obtained from a study 
of the annual statistics of operation over the past ten years and a graph of the 
more important items is, therefore, presented on an accompanying page. 

The available traffic in any district is naturally a function of the population 
so it is encouraging to note that, during the decade covered by the graph, the 
population served has increased from 30,000 to 70,000 — that is, it has more 
than doubled. This means that the inherent possibilities of the railway are 
very good indeed, especially when statistics of other corresponding districts 
indicate that the number of times per year the average resident uses an electric 
railway increases very rapidly as the population grows. This is but natural 
as, once a city has reached a certain size, the new population must settle in the 
outskirts at some distance from the business section and consequently must 
use the street cars to a greater extent than older population settled closer down- 
town. There is also a tendency for manufacturing plants to locate on the 
outskirts to secure proper railway sidings, lower taxes, etc., all of which increases 
the average riding per head of population. 

The lack of adequate facilities to take care of the increased traffic is clearly 
shown by the curve of revenue passengers which, as pointed out, should have 
shown an appreciable improvement in riding habit when the population doubled. 

The comparative returns for November, 1921, and 1922, show this to be 
the case as the passengers increased almost 10 per cent, due entirely to the new 
cars, track, other facilities and the. more reliable service rendered in November, 
1922, over November, 1921. There is every reason to anticipate that the 
coming year will show a considerable increase both in the riding habit per in- 
habitant and in the total revenue passengers handled, as the facilities are how 
much mproved. 

The same remarks are equally applicable to the curve of operating revenue. 
There should also be an improvement in the additional revenue secured from the 
non-resident or casual rider who is now charged six cents for his fare on local 
lines. This change was explained to representatives of the municipalities at a 
meeting in Windsor towards the close of the year. 

It will be noted from the graph that the annual car miles operated by the 
old company remained practically constant during the last six years under its 
control. The number of passengers carried increased about 75 per cent during 
the same period. In other words the service (i.e. the car miles run per passenger) 
was very much reduced. This fault, as far as possible, has been corrected 
with the equipment that is available and still further improvement will be made 
if the municipalities authorize the purchase of the additional cars now being 
recommended by the Commission. The graph indicates that there was no 
increase in car miles given by the railway from 1913 to 1919 and that since 
then, under the Commission management, there has been an increase of 45 
per cent. The lack of proper service in 1918 and 1919 resulted in there being no 
gain in passengers carried during that period and is in remarkable contrast with 
the period from 1919 to 1922 where an increase in service of 40 per cent resulted 
in a corresponding increase in passengers carried. 



166 



FIFTEENTH ANNUAL REPORT OF THE 



No. 49 



ESSEX DISTRICT RAILWAYS 
OPERATING STATISTICS 



/£ 00,0 00 
1.4 00.0 00 
J. 3 00.0 00 
/,2 00.0 00 
/;/ 00.000 
/, 00 0,0 00. 
90 0,000 

600.000 
560.000. 
S 2 0.000. 
480.000 
440.000. 
400,000 
360,000 


CAR MILES 


















































































































































REVENUE 
















































































































/ 
























y 


































200,000 
240.000 
200, 000. 




















































































460,000 
420.000 
3 S 0.0 00 
340, 000. 
300, 000 
260.000 
220,000. 
/ 00,000 
/4 0.0 00 
/ 00,000 


E - -" E f . 3 E 3 


































































































































































































"^ 
























REVENUE PASSENGERS CARRIED 


/ 1,000,000 
/0000.000 
9.000,000. 
8000,000 
7,000000 
6,000,000 
5,000.000 
4,000.000. 
3,000.000. 










































/ 
























f 








































































































*^^ 
































70,000. 
60,000 
50J>00. 
40,000 
30.000 


POPULATION SE RVE D 


































































































1912 


1913 


1914 


1915 


1916 


1917 


1918 


1919 


\9Z0 


1921 


1922 


1923 



1924 HYDRO-ELECTRIC POWER COMMISSION 167 

It should be noted, first, that the traffic handled and revenue secured have 
shown a gratifying increase in rate of growth as compared with the preceding 
years and, second, that the operating expenses per car mile have been kept 
within 10 per cent of the 1919 figure although employees' wages, cost of power 
and other items of expense have increased at a greater rate. These results 
could not have been secured if the improvement programme had not been 
carried out. 

The operating expenses per car mile for the period immediately preceding 
the acquisition of the railway as compared with the corresponding figure for 
recent periods with the rehabilitation programme finished, possibly gives the 
best justification for the new expenditure incurred. It is well known that the 
company curtailed every possible expense for some months prior to turning over 
the railway and, therefore, the expense of 27 cents per car mile for such period, 
with practically no maintenance being done on either track or cars, was very 
much less than it should have been. Since that date wages of employees have 
been increased nearly 40 per cent, the cost of power has increased about the 
same percentage and practically every other charge also, including an amount 
to make up for the deferred maintenance, and yet the corresponding figure for 
the fiscal year 1922 is 29.5 cents per car mile. Many of the improvements 
were not installed until late in the summer, hence it is reasonable to anticipate 
a lower operating cost for the current year. The operating expenses per car 
mile for the month of November, 1922, were 25.4 cents or considerably below 
the corresponding figure for the last year under the old company. control, when 
wages, cost of power, etc., were very much less and when no attempt was made 
to maintain the property in working condition. 

It has been asserted that the Commission did not have the right to take 
over the existing railway on behalf of the municipalities until the 1920 Act was 
passed, i.e. some two months after the purchase deal was put through. This 
statement is incorrect as the amendment to The Hydro-Electric Railway Act 
passed in 1916 provided — 

"The agreement may include the purchase - 

or running rights over any steam railway, 

electric railway, etc., as part of the railway to be constructed by 
the Commission." 

Those who have made the above statements that the Commission was not 
empowered to take over the railway, have evidently been misled by section three 
of the 1920 Act passed about three months after the railway was acquired. 
This section repealing the corresponding section of the 1916 amendment was 
passed on the recommendation of legal counsel to make the clause more clear, 
but counsel, at the same time, maintained that the language of the original 
clause left no doubt respecting the right of the Commission to acquire a railway 
to form a part or a whole of any proposed line. It should further be pointed 
out that the Government itself recognized the Commission's authority to pur- 
chase the railways by passing orders-in-council authorizing the purchase agree- 
ment and the guaranteeing of the bonds, etc., and, still further, that the bonds 
were marketed and duly approved by the counsel of purchasers. 

Guelph District Railways 

Equipment 

Previous to the acquisition of this road by the Commission, service was 
given with heavy, double-truck, two-man cars of a type suitable for heavy 
service in large cities. When it is pointed out that these cars, throughout the 



168 FIFTEENTH ANNUAL REPORT OF THE No. 49 

greater part of the day, carried an average of only four or five passengers, it 
can readily be seen that the heavy expenditure on maintenance of both track 
and equipment, power and crew wages, necessitated by their use was not war- 
ranted by the traffic. They were, therefore, replaced by eight one-man, safety 
cars similar to those supplied for use on the Essex District Railways mentioned 
above. They have proved successful in operation and have helped, materially, 
to reduce operating expenses. 

Track, Roadway and Buildings 

The programme of reconstruction initiated shortly after the Commission 
assumed the management of the Guelph radial railway has been continued 
throughout the year. 

The single track line along Woolwich, Wyndham, Carden and Wilson 
streets was torn up and has been replaced with 80-lb. rail, having welded joints 
and resting on steel ties embedded in concrete; 80-lb. material was also placed 
on the curve at Surrey and Neeve streets in conjunction with 140-lb. special 
work. 

Reconstruction with 85-lb. steel was carried out on Brock road and Moore 
avenue, on Waterloo street from Edinburgh street to the end of the line and on 
Elora road between Suffolk and Clark streets, this latter stretch being paved 
with concrete. 85-lb. steel was also used in a new interchange track with the 
C.P.R. on York road. 

80-lb. relay rail was used in reconstructing the track in front of the G.T.R. 
depot, on Elora road from Kitchener road to the end of the line, in the con- 
struction of new passing sidings on Gordon street and on Ontario street and on 
the single track gap on Surrey street between Gordon and Huskisson streets. 
In connection with the two last mentioned installations 140-lb. special work 
was employed. 

A new diamond has been placed at the C.P.R. crossing on York road and 
the track at various places throughout the system reballasted and paved. 

In addition to the above a considerable amount of joint welding, bonding, 
renewal of poles and wiring has been completed and the distribution system, 
except at a few points which are under construction, put in first-class condition. 

Operation 

The rehabilitation of the Guelph properties which has been under way 
since they were acquired by the Commission, is now well advanced. There 
are still certain details requiring attention but these will likely be carried out 
during the ensuing year. 

It is well known that when the Commission took over this property the 
roadbed and equipment were in such a condition that it was impossible to 
operate efficiently. In other words, conditions that have faced the Commission 
during the past year or two were practically the same as those which were met 
with in Windsor and which have already been outlined in the report on the 
operation of the Essex District railways. 

Prior to the acquisition of the property by the Hydro-Electric Power 
Commission, the line for some years had not been meeting its operating expenses, 
and hence during the rehabilitation period the benefits from the suggested 
improvements would naturally not be fully apparent. The work of rehabilita- 
tion is now being completed and the present operating statistics show con- 
clusively that the rebuilding of the line was well advised because it is now possible 
to give a very much improved service and this condition is reflected in the earn- 






1923 HYDRO-ELECTRIC POWER COMMISSION 169 

ings which also show improvement with a considerable reduction in operating 
expenses notwithstanding the increased car mileage. 

In connection with the financing of the undertaking the city of Guelph 
issued the necessary debentures as collateral guarantee only and the line is 
being purchased not from these debentures but, as is shown by the operating 
statement, out of receipts from revenue. It has been said that the actual 
agreement under which the road is now being operated was different from that 
originally presented to the electors in 1919, and that these differences were not 
explained. This is incorrect as the matter was thoroughly discussed at many 
public meetings when the final agreement was under consideration. The 
Guelph daily papers for December, 1920, set out the proposition in great detail. 
They contained letters from the city solicitor as well as editorials commenting 
upon the two agreements. 

An attempt is being made to show that the Commission's estimates for 
rehabilitation and improvements have been largely exceeded. The expenditure 
to date is approximately $265,000 or some 35 per cent over the estimate sub- 
mitted in November, 19.19. Those making such incorrect statements must 
lack even a superficial knowledge of what was included in the estimates as 
compared with the work actually carried out. The 1919 report explicitly 
stated that the estimate of $197,000 included the cost of putting the railway 
"in fair operating condition only." The rehabilitation and betterments carried 
out have gone far beyond the 1919 estimate but only after thorough discussions 
with the city. An additional $150,000 over that provided to take care of the 
$197,000 estimate, was authorized by motion of the city council on June 19, 
1922. The rehabilitation programme has been carried out under various 
estimates that have been submitted by the Commission and approved by the 
city council of Guelph. 

There may possibly be some misunderstanding as to the present rates of 
fare, because some reference has been made to a statement of the Chairman 
of the Commission in December, 1919 — that the estimate of that date con- 
templated a continuation of a straight 5-cent rate. Since that time the Com- 
mission has recommended a considerable number of improvements not con- 
templated in 1919, and there has also been a large increase in the cost of 
labour and material. These changes in programme were duly ratified by the 
city council and the improved financial statement made possible by these better- 
ments justifies the Commission's recommendations. The average citizen of 
Guelph can still secure the old 5-cent fare by purchasing tickets while the casual 
rider or visitor is certainly not injured in being required to pay the 6-cent cash 
fare recommended by the Commission and assented to by the city council. 
The citizens in general have made up the deficiency in revenue that has occurred 
during the past years in their tax bills and it would seem perfectly equitable 
to ask the visiting rider to pay slightly more than the average citizen as such 
a rider does not assume any responsibility beyond his straight car fare. 

The number of passengers handled and the revenue from operation has 
shown a favourable increase, and the operating expenses, even with an increase 
in service, are showing a substantial reduction now that the improvement 
programme is completed. It is quite true that depreciation and sinking fund 
must sooner or later be provided for, but it is unreasonable to expect a street 
railway system operating in a small city to earn sufficient during a rehabilitation 
period to take care of such additional charges as well as the operating and capital 
expenses. Even large city properties are frequently unable to make such pro- 
visions. The Government evidently considers it perfectly equitable to defer 



170 FIFTEENTH ANNUAL REPORT OF THE No. 49 

sinking fund for a period of ten years to permit any railway operated under the 
Hydro-Electric Railway Act to become well established and developed. The 
period for omission of sinking fund for the power undertaking is only five years 
but the power system is, relatively, a less expensive undertaking and one that 
does not require as long a period in which to become established. There are 
few electric railways that make provision out of revenue for retiring the total 
capital invested and, therefore, from all sides it would appear equitable to 
defer depreciation during the rehabilitation period, and sinking fund for a 
period of ten years. 

It may be suggested that it would have been more advantageous for Guelph 
to elect the members of the Hydro Power Commission as a Board of Directors 
for the Guelph street railway, thus permitting Guelph to change the control 
from time to time as it might desire. This would not give Guelph the benefits 
of the Commission's engineering and operating staff, the value of which has 
been clearly shown in the reduction in operating expenses from 37.4 cents per 
car-mile to approximately 23 cents per car-mile during the past two years. 
The Commission could hardly be expected to keep a railway engineering and 
operating staff available from time to time for service for Guelph. 

The present agreement under which the railway is operated by the Com- 
mission on behalf of the city, was authorized by the electors after the matter 
had been thoroughly discussed in one form or another for a period of a year. 
The agreement is modelled on the standard form used for Hydro-Electric Rail- 
ways but contains some special clauses to meet certain local conditions and the 
requirements that were outlined by the Government. The Premier went on 
record to the Mayor of the city of Guelph, prior to the date of voting, that the 
Government would sanction and approve the agreement if it were accepted 
by the electors. This was taken care of by the Guelph Railway Act of 1922. 
A clause was inserted in the agreement that it would not be binding until such 
special Act had been passed. 

There appears to be an attempt to show that the city is receiving no financial 
benefit from placing its railway for a period of fifty years in the hands of the 
Commission, whose personnel may change from time to time. In the first place 
the city is even to-day receiving a considerable financial benefit inasmuch as 
the receipts are now sufficient to cover all operating expenses and interest on 
the entire capital. Before the railway was acquired, receipts were not sufficient 
to meet the purely operating expenses. In the second place the tracks, cars 
and property have been placed in first-class condition and a much more frequent 
and reliable service is being given. This may not be a direct financial benefit 
to the city but must at least be a very welcome improvement and indirectly 
is doubtless a financial benefit. 

Lastly, the decision to transfer the railway to the management of the 
Commission as trustee for the municipality of Guelph was only authorized 
after the agreement had been carefully scrutinized. Such matters as the con- 
tinuation of the present Hydro Commissioners in office, the 50-year contract 
and other important features, were fully discussed prior to voting so that the 
mandate of the people — of 1,152 votes for the agreement and 472 against — is 
conclusive evidence that they were in favour of the proposed change in manage- 
ment. 

It will be noted from the operating statement given in the next subdivision 
of this report that the railway has paid taxes as it did prior to the date of transfer 
to the Commission management. 



1923 HYDRO-ELECTRIC POWER COMMISSION [71 

ESSEX DISTRICT RAILWAYS 

Operating Statistics 

Route-miles: 

City trolley 14.56 

City trollibus 4.21 

Amherstburg interurban 14.31 

Tecumseh interurban 6.42 

Total route-miles 39.32 

Passenger and freight car-miles operated 1,482,516 

Passenger and freight car-hours operated 176,847 

Average number of employees 153 

Accidents 316. 

Passengers carried 11,015,257 

Percentage of transfer passengers to revenue passengers 13.5 

Passenger cars operated 57 

Passengers carried per route-mile 280,143 

Passengers carried per car-mile 7.6 

Passengers carried per car-hour 63.5 

Average mileage per car operated. . 25,385 

Average passenger per car operated 193,250 

Average riding (revenue) habit 147.9 

Freight tonnage carried 6,726 

GUELPH DISTRICT RAILWAYS 

Operating Statistics 

Route-miles 8.49 

Passenger and freight car-miles operated. . . • 215,796 

Passenger and freight car-hours operated 30,735 

Average number of employees 34 

Accidents 53 

Passengers carried 1,545,623 

Percentage of transfer passengers to revenue passengers 14.2 

Passenger cars operated 13 

Passengers carried per route-mile 157,606 

Passengers carried per car-mile 7.2 

Passengers carried per car-hour 52.3 

Average mileage per car operated 16,393 

Average passengers per car operated 118,894 

Average riding (revenue) habit 74.2 



172 FIFTEENTH ANNUAL REPORT OF THE No. 49 



SANDWICH, WINDSOR AND AMHERSTBURG RAILWAY AND 

STATEMENT OF ASSETS AND 



Assets 

Road and Equipment Rights, Franchises and Goodwill of the Sand- 
wich, Windsor and Amherstburg Railway $2,299,700.77 

Of the Windsor & Tecumseh Electric Railway Company 367,561.55 

Construction Material on hand 55,051.19 

$2,722,313.51 

Investments: 

City of Windsor 4^ per cent. Bonds due 1960 $190,000 00 

Interest accrued thereon 712.50 

190,712.50 

Materials and Spare Equipment $48,842.35 

Stationery, Tickets and other Supplies 3,754.31 

Accounts Receivable 6.329.02 

Cash in Bank 10,444.97 

69,370.65 

Detroit United Railway — In respect of Bond Interest accrued 10,762.50 

Valuation and other expenses re purchase of Plant Assets and Capital 

Stock of these Companies by the Hydro-Electric Power Com- 
mission of Ontario $17,795.45 

Less three-tenths written off 5,338.64 

12,456.81 

Insurance unexpired 5,177.09 



$3,010,793.06 



SANDWICH, WINDSOR AND AMHERSTBURG RAILWAY AND 
COMBINED OPERATING ACCOUNT FOR THE 

Maintenance — Way and Structures $ 36,351.34 

Maintenance — Equipment 65,032.02 

Power , . 49,070.99 

Transportation Expenses 215,567.50 

General and Miscellaneous Expenses 69,659.45 

Taxes : 3,471.94 

$439,153.24 

Interest on borrowings 38,819.70 

Interest on bonds, $2,039,000.00* issued by the Hydro-Electric Power Com- 
mission of Ontario to cover the purchase price of the Plant assets and Capital 
Stock of the Railway Company 91,755.00 

$569,727.94 



* $689,000.00 of these bonds are held by the National Trust Company as security for 
retirement at maturity, by the Detroit United Railways, of the outstanding bonds of the 
Railway companies. 

Note: Interest on- the outstanding bonds of the Railway companies has been paid by the 
Detroit United Railways under agreement dated 14th January, 1920. 



923 HYDRO-ELECTRIC POWER COMMISSION 173 



THE WINDSOR AND TEGUMSEH ELECTRIC RAILWAY COMPANY 
LIABILITIES, 31st OCTOBER, 1922 

Liabilities 

Capital Stock: 

Sandwich, Windsor & Amherstburg Railway, 2,970 shares of 

par value of $100.00 each $297,000.00 

Windsor & Tecumseh Electric Railway, 1,000 shares of par value 

of $100.00 each 100,000.00 

General Reserves 753,839.58 

$1,150,839.58 

Bonded Debt: 

Sandwich, Windsor & Amherstburg Railway First Mortgage 

Gold Bonds due 1st December, 1922 $490,000.00 

Windsor & Tecumseh Electric Railway Co. First Mortgage 5 

per cent. Gold Bonds due 2nd September, 1927 189,000.00 

Interest accrued to 31st October, 1922 . ". 10,762.50 

689,762.50 

Hydro Electric Power Commission of Ontario: 

Cash Advance $1,100,000.00 

Less Current Account . .• . 40,997.95 

1,059,002.05 

Accounts payable and accrued charges 22,646.47 

Deposits to cover cost of customers sidings 3,916.25 

Provision for unredeemed tickets 2,200.00 

28,762.72 

Premium on Hydro-Electric Power Commission 6 per cent. Bonds 73,166.67 

Surplus 9,259.54 

$3,010,793.06 



THE WINDSOR AND TECUMSEH ELECTRIC RAILWAY COMPANY 
YEAR ENDED, 31st OCTOBER, 1922 



Operating Revenue $556,792.68 

Interest from Bonds of the City of Windsor 8,550.00 

Total Revenue $565,342.68 

Net Deficit for the year 4,385.26 



$569,727.94 



174 FIFTEENTH ANNUAL REPORT OF THE No. 49 



GUELPH RADIAL 
STATEMENT OF ASSETS AND 



Assets 

Road and Equipment $395,377.65 

Construction Material 6,030.12 

Stores and Spare Parts $4,802.21 

Stationery, Tickets and other Supplies 220.00 

Accounts Receivable 2,714.57 

Insurance unexpired 834.10 

Cash in Bank 863.55 

9,434.43 

Valuation and other expenses re purchase of plant assets by the Hydro- 
Electric Power Commission of Ontario 2,563.00 

Less — one-fifth written off 512.60 

2,050.40 
Due by the City of Guelph 15,062.78 



$427,955.38 



GUELPH RADIAL 
OPERATING ACCOUNT FOR 



Maintenance — Way and Structures $ 6,729.40 

Maintenance — Equipment 16,261.27 

Power 10,808.54 

Transportation Expense 28,353.94 

General and Miscellaneous Expenses 13,569.36 

Taxes 3,176.82 

$78,899.33 

Interest 6,334.69 

Payment to City of Guelph, of Instalment due 1st May, 1922, and pro- 
vision for payment due 1st November, 1922: 

Interest for year $6,581.68 

On account of Principal : 5,118.32 

11,700.00 



$96,934.02 



923 HYDRO-ELECTRIC POWER COMMISSION 175 



RAILWAY 

LIABILITIES, 31st OCTOBER, 1922 



Liabilities 

Hydro-Electric Power Commission of Ontario: 

In respect of the purchase price of the railway from the City of 

Guelph under agreement dated 8th December, 1920 $150,000.00 

Less — Instalments paid on account of principal 

1st November, 1921 $2,475.00 

1st May, 1922 2,530.69 

5,005.69 

$144,994.31 

In respect of the 6 per cent. 1931 bonds, issued by the Commission for the purposes 

of the railway 150,000.00 

Interest accrued thereon 4,489.32 

In respect of demand loan from the Bank of Montreal, obtained by the Commission 
for the purposes of the .railway secured by $150,000.00 Guelph Radial 6% 
1942 Bonds 115,000.00 

$414,483.63 
Less — a portion of the proceeds of loan, held, for the time being, by the 

Commission $8,021.57 



406,462.06 



Accounts payable, and accrued charges $15,211.88 

Provision for unredeemed tickets 620.00 

Deposits to cover cost of Sidings to be constructed for customers. . . . 655.75 

16,487.63 

General Reserve 5,005.69 

$427,955.38 



RAILWAY 

YEAR ENDED 31st OCTOBER, 1922 



Operating Revenue $74,022.51 

Net deficit for year, payable by the city of Guelph 22,911.51 



$96,934.02 



176 



FIFTEENTH ANNUAL REPORT OF THE 



No. 49 



SECTION VIII 

GENERAL ACTIVITIES 
ELECTRICAL INSPECTION 

Inasmuch as all electrical installation work in the province of Ontario 
has to be carried out in accordance with definite rules, with which -wiremen are 
now well acquainted, inspection has become so well standardized that it is 
unnecessary here to refer in detail to this aspect of the work of the Department 
of Electrical Inspection. 

The work of the Electrical Inspection department grows with the growth 
of the Commission's operations. Every new municipality connected, even 
every new customer, adds something to the department's responsibilities. 
The increase in the amount of work handled by the department is well illustrated 
by the following table: 



Year 


Number of 
Permits Issued 


Number of 
Inspections 


1916 




100,787 


1917 




113,863 


1918 




110,445 


1919 




135,804 


1920 


87,399 
84,352 
91,932 


160,990 


1921 


160,873 


1922 


182,522 









Although the work of the Inspection department grows in proportion to 
the steady increase in the number of electrical installations in the Province, 
it is satisfactory to record that the extra work in 1922, as compared with 1921, 
was handled by practically the same sized staff, there being only two new 
inspectors. One new inspector was appointed at Sioux Lookout, north of Fort 
William, this appointment being necessary on account of the special activity 
in house building which took place during the year in this territory. The other 
new inspector was appointed to meet the needs of a new district in the Timmins 
region, in Northern Ontario. This inspector is in charge of the new district of 
Cochrane, which comprises Cochrane, Iroquois Falls, Smooth Rock Falls and 
Kapuskasing. 



Defective Installations 



The amount of money spent each year by consumers, usually without any 
protest, in putting defective installations into good condition following recom- 
mendations made by the department, indicates that the public as a whole 
recognizes that these recommendations are made entirely for the public good. 



1923 HYDRO-ELECTRIC POWER COMMISSION \TJ 

The sum spent in 1922 throughout the Province on work of this kind was nearly 
$340,000, of which Toronto's share was $110,000. 

Electric Cooking 

Another item worthy of notice is the large number of electric cooking ranges 
used in various Hydro municipalities, for which, in very many instances, special 
wiring, involving special inspection, has been required. In twenty of the larger 
municipalities in the Province there are about 18,000 electric ranges in use, most 
of which have been installed during the last few years. 

Fires and Accidents 

The number of accidents and fires occurring annually in Ontario due to 
the use of electricity by the general public, is altogether insignificant. This 
will be better appreciated when it is remembered that there are more than 
300,000 consumers of electrical energy in the Province. Considering the very 
rapid rate of increase in the number of consumers throughout the whole period 
since the Electrical Inspection department was first created ten years ago, the 
fact that so few accidents occur may be attributed in large measure to the 
vigilance of the department and to the loyal co-operation therewith of practically 
all wiring contractors and wiremen, who realize that their best interests are 
served by having all installation work kept up to a reasonable standard of safety. 

Inspection in Rural Districts 

The extension of the Commission's lines into rural districts is also adding 
considerably to the work of the Inspection department, for not only is the 
number of inspections to be made in such districts becoming quite appreciable — 
approximately 355 miles of rural lines were constructed, and about 1,500 rural 
consumers were connected in 1922 — but the fact that these consumers are far 
apart as compared with those in cities, makes the work relatively more arduous. 
It may be mentioned here, also, that this same fact makes inspection in rural 
districts considerably more expensive than in cities and towns where the popula- 
tion is more dense. 

It has been pointed out in earlier annual reports that the Inspection depart- 
ment is at all times in close touch with the Commission's Testing and Approval 
Laboratory; this is essential, for it is plain that no installation work could be 
considered good or safe, however well the work might be carried out, if the 
apparatus, devices, material, etc., made use of, were of poor design or quality. 

Committee on Rules and Regulations 

Apart from the actual work of inspection, the Inspection department has, 
during the year, been closely associated with the revision of the Commission's 
"Rules and Regulations for Inside Electrical Installations," which are in the 
hands of a sub-committee of the Rules and Regulations Committee. This 
latter body is composed of various members of the Commission's staff drawn from 
the Inspection and Engineering departments, and of representatives of those 
outside bodies specially interested in such work. 

The outside bodies thus represented are: 

The American Institute of Electrical Engineers. (Toronto Branch) 
The Toronto Electrical Contractors' Association. 
The Canadian Fire Underwriters' Association. 
The Electrical Jobbers' Association. 



m FIFTEENTH ANNUAL REPORT OF THE No. 49 

The Electrical Supply Manufacturers. 

The Electrical Manufacturers. 

The Fire Marshal of Ontario. 

The Ontario Safety League. 

The Ontario Association of Architects. 

The Ontario Association of Electrical Contractors and Dealers. 

The Association of Municipal Electrical Utilities of Ontario. 

The Chief Electrical Inspector is chairman of both the main and the sub- 
committees. 

The Commission's "Rules and Regulations," as closely as seems desirable 
for Ontario conditions, follows the National Electrical Code of the National 
Board of Fire Underwriters in the United States, and, since the latter is at present 
under revision and will be published early next summer, it has been thought well 
to delay putting into force any revised rules until advance copies of the proposed 
changes in the National Electrical Code become available. These, it is expected, 
will be ready some time in January, 1923. The National Code is well-known all 
over this continent and the Commission's rules follow it as closely as possible. 
In addition, the Commission's Code embodies many provisos regarding safety 
to life with which the National Board of Fire Underwriters has not in the past 
concerned itself. 

Radio Equipment 

The number of persons who have installed "radio" equipment within the 
past year has been phenomenal, and the Inspection department has noted with 
regret that this has given rise to quite a number of accidents. In the United 
States the same conditions are to be found on a larger scale, and the National 
Board of Fire Underwriters has already issued a set of tentative rules designed 
both to minimize fire risk and accidents by warning unsuspecting persons of 
possible dangers, and to constitute a standard for safe construction and 
installation. It was felt that some such action was needed in Ontario, and at 
the instigation of the Inspection department the matter of formulating a set of 
rules governing "radio" installations is being given careful consideration. 

Electrical Homes 

"Electrical Homes," that is, houses specially wired and furnished with 
convenience outlets in practically every room, have been on exhibition within 
the past year or two in several Ontario municipalities. These houses are of 
course equipped by various branches of the electrical industry, in co-operation 
with the builders, for advertising purposes, but they are of advantage to the 
Electrical Inspection department because the public is educated to know what 
constitutes a first-class installation comprising the best materials and workman- 
ship and the safest types of household electrical devices. 

Moreover, the provision of an ample number of properly installed outlets 
reduces the risk attached to the indiscriminate use of long extension cords and 
amateur wiring. 

One other matter of interest which may be mentioned is the excellent 
influence which the equipping of these so-called "Electrical Homes" has had 
on builders, who, on the whole, have been quick to realize the convenience 
and consequent selling advantages of first-class electrical installation work and 
the provision of numerous outlets to which various household electrical devices 
may readily be connected. 



923 HYDRO-ELECTRIC POWER COMMISSION 179 



LABORATORIES 

In this department are centralized the functions of testing, research, and of 
inspection of materials, and the facilities and staff are at the service of the 
municipalities, in connection with all problems coming within the scope of these 
functions. 

A considerable amount of testing has been done for the municipalities but 
it is believed that much greater use should be made of the Laboratories by the 
municipalities, and an effort is being made by means of articles in the "Bulletin" 
to describe the facilities for testing and research which are offered by the Com- 
mission through the Laboratories. 

Despite a decrease in certain portions of the laboratory work, the total 
volume of testing has maintained the level of previous years. The growth of the 
Commission's activities has given rise to an increase in the testing and research 
work connected with problems of maintenance and operation, and this has offset 
the decrease due to the completion of several large construction jobs. The 
variety of work has increased during the year and the added knowledge and 
experience gained by the staff in attacking new and unusual problems is of 
increasing value in the routine work of the department. 

The volume of testing for parties outside the Commission (exclusive of 
approval testing) has not been great during the year, but it has been varied in 
character and has included electrical, chemical and physical problems. 

The reports of the various sections of the Laboratories, seven in number, 
given below indicate by examples the activities of the department during the 
year. Several tests of particular interest or importance, and certain items of 
equipment are illustrated in the accompanying cuts. 



High-Tension and Electrical Testing Laboratory 

The general routine activities of the High-Tension and Electrical Testing 
Laboratory have followed the lines indicated in previous reports, and special 
attention has been given to several problems which have become of great 
economic importance. 

As one of these last, the construction and installation of a reliable system 
of communication using radio frequency equipment with the main power trans- 
mission line as a guide has been carried on with assured success. Considerable 
experimental work has been necessary to adapt the equipment to local con- 
ditions and to increase the efficiency of communication. This system promises 
greater reliability during periods of trouble as well as freedom from inductive 
disturbances at audio-frequencies which are always present when communication 
lines run in close proximity and parallel to power lines. 

Again, the general problem of inductive interference of power circuits with 
communication lines which is increasing with the expansion of the distribution 
systems and which has given rise to much litigation in various parts of the 
United States, has been dealt with by the Laboratory in a sound engineering 
manner. 

Special attention is required to be given to generating apparatus, trans- 
formers, etc., in order to eliminate all sources of such distortions in wave form as 
cause interference in neighbouring communication circuits, but which are little 
or no trouble to the power circuit itself. Elaborate and severe tests have been 
planned and carried out in close co-operation with one well-known communication 



180 FIFTEENTH ANNUAL REPORT OF THE No. 49 

company, thus obtaining definite knowledge as to what is or is not possible in 
correcting troubles of this nature. In this connection it is worthy of note that 
the voltage wave forms of the new Queenston generators are nearly ideal. 

Investigations have been made on equipment for specific purposes, some 
theoretical only, others supplemented by practical work when advisable. The 
experience obtained by the staff in carrying out such investigations is reflected 
in the facility with which problems of widely differing characteristics are attacked 
and solved. 

Special problems of more or less general interest have included the following: 

Tests and study of heat insulations for electrically-heated water tanks 
and the determination of comparative efficiencies of various materials ; electrical 
characteristics of paints, varnishes, tapes, compounds, etc., and proposed 
systems of high-voltage direct-current transformation. Supplementary methods 
of heating have been given some attention with a view to ameliorating con- 
ditions anticipated on account of fuel scarcity. Some advisory inspection and 
testing of a special character has been undertaken on engineering materials and 
assembled parts for electrical purposes. Systems of refrigeration, electric and 
electrically driven, have also been investigated and more work remains to be 
done along this line. Special high-voltage testing, for which the facilities of this 
Laboratory are particularly well adapted, has been carried out. 

The service which a laboratory such as this may render is increased in value 
by using it as a clearing house for up-to-date scientific knowledge with special 
reference to its application to engineering practice. The field of applied electrical 
engineering is very wide and progress therein is made more certain by co-ordin- 
ation of effort through such an agency as this laboratory. 

Approval Laboratory 

The improvement in business conditions in the electrical manufacturing 
trade has been reflected in the increased number of applications for approval of 
devices received during the year, nearly 200 new or improved devices or appliances 
having been submitted. During the same period 139 approval reports were 
completed and 153 cards issued summarizing these reports. In addition, a large 
number of applications was received from manufacturers using the Underwriters' 
Laboratories "re-examination" or "label" service, and 103 cards covering their 
products were added to the approval record. 

Among the new lines added during the year have been bread wrapping and 
sealing machines, water-pumping outfits, portable drills and grinders, motor- 
operated fans and blowers, interlocking switches for elevator doors and porcelain 
insulating devices. Additions have been made by many manufacturers to their 
lines of air and water heaters, ranges, snap switches and receptacles, etc. 

Following up the issue by the Rules and Regulations Committee of a 
tentative set of rules for radio installations, applications were received for the 
approval of a number of so-called socket antennae devices and arresters. Inquiries 
have also been received from several importers of English and European electrical 
goods, and undoubtedly a number of lines such as theirs will be submitted for 
approval during the coming year. 

A revision of the specifications issued to date is now under way in order that 
they may be brought up to date and into line with improvements accepted by the 
manufacturers and other interests concerned. A specification for Christmas 
Tree lighting sets allowing considerable leeway from the standard applying to 
flexible cords has been adopted. This will result, it is believed, in reducing the 



1923 HYDRO-ELECTRIC POWER COMMISSION 181 

fire hazard from Christmas trees on which candles are now used, by encouraging 
the use of electric lights instead. 

For the re-examination service a schedule of fees has been adopted and the 
original agreement for this service has been superseded by a new form which 
requires the applicant to pay a fixed sum per annum in advance for each line of 
devices or appliances which receives the approval of the Commission. In line 
with the new schedule of fees a scheme of re-examination annually or quarterly 
has been worked out and put into operation during the year. Likewise the 
label service has been put on a regular schedule and inspections are made at the 
factory of each user of this service monthly, wherever possible. The number of 
labels distributed this year has been practically double that distributed in the 
previous fiscal year. 

The work of following up advertisements in the technical and daily press 
and electrical displays at exhibitions and fairs has been carried on vigorously 
and has resulted in the practical elimination of advertisements and displays of 
"unlisted" goods offered for sale in Ontario. 

Meter and Standards Laboratory 

While the year has been marked with a slight decrease of the independent 
work of the Meter Laboratory, there has been a great volume of work done in 
co-operation with other sections. In many tests made in the field, especially 
upon new power houses and stations which were being placed in service, or 
rearranged, it has been possible to co-ordinate the work of this Laboratory with 
the High-Tension and Electrical Testing Laboratory, so that results could be 
obtained with greatest efficiency and general satisfaction. Almost every test 
is a special problem with its own individual characteristics, and for each a 
peculiar equipment of instruments and measuring equipment gives the best 
results. In assisting in the selection of this equipment, the Meter Laboratory 
has been of great help, and by the maintaining of a continual check on the 
accuracy of the apparatus, has eliminated many sources of controversy. 

In a number of these field tests the oscillograph has proved of inestimable 
value. Practically all large generators now installed are required to withstand 
very severe short-circuit tests ; and these produce in the circuits transient effects 
that may last but a very small fraction of a second — a period far too short to 
give dependable readings on instruments of the indicating type. Here the 
oscillograph is able to detect not only the maximum swing of current, but to 
give a permanent record of the exact time taken for a steady condition to be 
reached, and to furnish a complete history of conditions existing at the same 
time in auxiliary circuits. A number of such tests have been made, and engin- 
eering information gathered which could not have been obtained satisfactorily 
in any other manner. In a transforming station, where it was feared that a 
rearrangement of connections which was under way with a view to increasing 
the system capacity might be productive of conditions which would cause trouble 
on neighbouring communication circuits, the oscillograph was called into service 
and the most desirable conditions of operation quickly and definitely determined. 
When such outside tests as these are not in progress, the oscillograph is usually 
kept set up in the Laboratory, and can be put into service at short notice. It 
has been possible thus to supplement many tests which were in progress in the 
Laboratories with oscillographic records, thereby adding immensely to the 
value of the tests. Among these may be mentioned tests on rectifiers, telephone 
circuits and experimental systems of transformer connections. 



\_82 FIFTEENTH ANNUAL REPORT OF THE No. 49 

Throughout the earlier part of the year there continued a great activity 
in the movement of watthour meters through the Meter shops, there being a 
larger demand for second-hand apparatus, and also for new meters, many of 
which received their Government inspection at the Laboratory. For some weeks 
in the summer, watthour meter work was comparatively quiet, but with the 
coming of the autumn and the shortage of coal, encouraging the use of small 
heater units, there was a distinct revival of meter work and considerable ship- 
ments were handled in the Meter shops. Several new types of meters have come 
into use in the year and opportunity has been taken to make careful tests upon 
these at the Laboratories, their performance being carefully watched afterwards 
in service, under the variety of conditions of use existing upon the Commission's 
systems. Besides watthour meters, a few new types of measuring instruments, 
such as demand indicators and graphic meters have made their appearance, and 
have been submitted to complete tests to prove their worthiness. 

A number of meetings of the Watthour-Meter Sub-Committee of the 
Canadian Engineering Standards Association have been attended, and a standard 
specification for meters, agreeable to manufacturers, users and federal authorities 
is nearing completion. The Laboratory has a representative also upon the 
Instruments and Measurements Committee of the American Institute of Electrical 
Engineers and by his work the Commission is kept in the closest touch with the 
most up-to-date practice in metering, both in Canada and the United States. 

The repairing of instruments and various testing devices for other depart- 
ments and for outside parties has continued as heretofore in considerable volume, 
full use being made of the Instrument shop and the Standards equipment. 
Indicating and recording instruments, meggers, time switches, relays and 
testing sets may be mentioned. The Instrument shop has been busily engaged 
in co-operation with other departments of the Laboratories in the construction 
of special equipment needed in individual tests. The investigation of stresses 
in bus-bars, referred to elsewhere in this report, called for apparatus of a most 
delicate and special nature, which required many modifications and additional 
refinements as the tests proceeded. This equipment was all constructed in the 
Instrument shop, the closest co-operation being required between the instrument 
builders and the engineers conducting the test. Upon completion of this 
investigation, much of the apparatus which was developed for the tests was 
salvaged and has been added to the permanent equipment of the Laboratories. 
A large part of the radio equipment being placed in use by the Commission for 
purposes of communication has been built and assembled in this shop. Here, 
also, have been constructed a number of pieces of permanent equipment for the 
Structural Materials Laboratory, and for the production of test specimens used 
in investigations of the characteristics of steels and other materials which have 
become a matter of routine. 

Full advantage has been taken of the occasional quiet periods in the work of 
the Laboratory to improve the equipment generally, bringing it up to higher 
degrees of accuracy and efficiency of operation. This applies particularly to the 
standardization apparatus. While, as described in last year's report, this 
equipment may be looked upon as being in permanent shape, new possibilities 
are continually becoming evident and slight improvements ever suggesting 
themselves. Some rearrangements of the wiring of the test tables in the Stand- 
ards room have been made, and a number of valuable improvements, built for 
the most part by the Instrument shop, added. An oil-immersion tank has been 
constructed for the standard resistances, and arranged for quick and convenient 
connection of any unit, as required in standardization work. The units terminate 



1923 



HYDRO-ELECTRIC POWER COMMISSION 



83 



I L 




METER AND STANDARDS LABORATORY 
Triple reversing switch for wattmeter testing and oil bath for standard resistances 

in mercury cups, and are thoroughly protected from the effects of moisture and 
other disturbing influences. This tank is illustrated in an accompanying cut. 
At one end is a small circulating pump, which is driven by an outside motor, and 
serves to keep the oil, when in use, at a uniform temperature* It is of interest, 
here, to note that, whereas it was formerly supposed that the only oil suitable 
for immersion of these standard resistances was a very expensive grade, obtain- 
able only in the United States and at a very high price, the Chemical Laboratory 
was able to derive a formula for an equally satisfactory oil, which was purchased 
at a reasonable figure from a local refinery. k *| 

Little new apparatus has been purchased for the Meter Laboratory, the 
present very complete equipment of meters and measuring devices being found 
capable of adaptation to practically all the work encountered in the routine of 
the Laboratories and to the special tests upon which the engineers have been 
engaged. At the same time it has been possible to place much of the metering 
apparatus at the disposal of other departments of the Commission and outside 
customers, for which service a moderate rental is charged. 



Photometric Laboratory 

The Photometric Laboratory is entrusted with all tests in which the measure- 
ment of light is involved, and is frequently consulted regarding the planning of 
the lighting for various classes of service. 

The greater proportion of the work of this section is the testing of lamps 
manufactured for the Commission under contract. Before contracts are placed 



]84 FIFTEENTH ANNUAL REPORT OF THE No. 49 

the lamp situation is studied and the results of the previous year's experience 
reviewed. New developments in lamp making are investigated when possible. 
With data thus accumulated the specifications of efficiencies, life performance and 
tolerances are decided upon for the next year's lamp supply. The efficiencies are 
studied with special reference to the rates for current for lighting, prevailing 
throughout the districts served by the Commission, the aim being to secure 
lamps that will give economical and reliable service. 

The lamp business for the coming year appeared to be of sufficient volume 
to justify the placing of a resident inspector in the factory supplying the lamps, 
and early in the fall this plan was carried out. . A member of the staff was trans- 
ferred to the factory and has direct supervision of all lamps made for the Com- 
mission. This inspector makes the regular inspection and tests to detect defects 
and measures the lamps to determine their conformity with specifications. 
Samples of lamps fulfilling requirements are forwarded to the Laboratory for 
life test. 

In addition to these duties the inspector, who receives copies of orders, 
directs the shipping. It has been found that this plan saves much time and 
enables shipments to be made direct to the purchasers when desirable, in addition 
to eliminating the delay caused by rejected shipments when inspection is made 
at the Laboratory. 

This section has co-operated with the engineering department in designing 
a system of signal lighting for Queenston generating station and is making tests 
of lamps for this purpose. 

Many important details of the lighting of Queenston and some other stations 
have been designed by this section. 

In addition to the Commission's own requirements systems have been 
planned and recommendations made for lighting several churches, an office, a 
collegiate institute and for the flood-lighting of an office building. 

The measurement of the absorption of light of enclosing globes has been 
reduced to a routine basis, and a scale of charges for such work has been decided 
upon. By making some slight additions to the equipment of the 7-foot sphere 
photometer such work can be done quickly and at very low cost. 

The selection of suitable glass for the panels of a street lighting lantern 
involved the measurement of the transmission of light by several samples of 
glass submitted. By this means the characteristics of the different samples were 
determined and the one best fulfilling the requirements was selected. 

Tests have been made on train lighting globes, interior lighting reflectors, 
street lighting globes, automobile headlights and street illumination. 

During the year the specifications for the testing of automobile headlight 
devices have been revised. 

Engineering Materials Laboratory 

The character of the work carried out by this Laboratory is the same as has 
been described in past reports to which the reader is referred. Only a few of the 
more interesting tests and investigations performed in the past year will there- 
fore be described here. 

Concrete Inserts 

The special size and design of the bus insulators for the Queenston power 
house raised the question of a suitable method of fastening these to the concrete 
of the floors, walls and ceilings. Ordinarily a metal plug known as an "insert" 






1923 



HYDRO-ELECTRIC POWER COMMISSION 



185 



and drilled to receive a bolt of proper size is embedded in the concrete at the time 
the concrete is placed. These inserts take many forms, each manufacturer 
claiming special advantages for the particular type made by him. A number 
of these inserts were submitted to the Laboratory for comparative tests. As a 
result of these experiments it was found that the effectiveness of an insert was 
almost altogether due to the depth to which it was embedded in the concrete and 
not to any projections or lugs with which it was embellished; that the only 
projection required was a shoulder on the end inserted in the concrete to prevent 
the insert pulling out. With this information an insert was designed having a 
pull-out strength of 16,000 pounds and which could be made from a drop forging 
at a cost very much less than that of the cast-iron insert ordinarily used. 

Floor Hardeners 

A great many compounds are available for the treatment of concrete floors 
and each is claimed to have advantages over all others. In order to obtain 
information concerning these, comparative tests were made on a number, both 
of the integral and surface treatment type. Concrete panels made up in a 
manner similar to the top course of a concrete floor were treated with the 
different preparations and subjected to mechanical abrasion test. 

The cut reproduced overleaf illustrates the apparatus used in making 
these tests. As will be seen, carborundum cylinders fit into upright pipes and 
rest on the concrete slabs under test and these in turn are fastened to the recip- 
rocating table driven by the electric motor. 

It was found in the case of the surface treatments that all were based on the 
well-known action of the fluosilicate compounds on concrete and that their 
effectiveness could be approximately predetermined from a knowledge of their 
chemical analysis. A floor hardener of this type made up in the Chemical 




STRUCTURAL MATERIALS LABORATORY 
Torsion test on large post-type insulator 



186 FIFTEENTH ANNUAL REPORT OF THE No. 49 

Laboratory proved as efficient as the best of those tested. The integral hardeners 
tested were made up mainly of calcium chloride and the results obtained with 
them were those which could be expected from the use of this salt. 

Line Materials 

Tests were carried out on different forms of strain and dead-end clamps. 
From the information gained from these tests a clamp of each type was finally 
obtained which was lighter in weight, neater in appearance and of better holding 
power than the clamps then in use. 

A particularly interesting series of tests was made on large post-type insu- 
lators. It was necessary to test these under a purely torsional load of 40,000 
inch-pounds and a purely bending load of 40,000 inch-pounds. To do this the 
machine shown in an adjacent illustration was constructed. As shown, it is set 
up for the torsion test, but with a few simple changes it was possible to use 
the same machine for the bending test. 

Metallurgical Studies 

The Laboratory has co-operated in the investigation to determine the cause 
of the failure of No. 15 generator at the plant of the Ontario Power Company. 
Physical, chemical and microscopic studies have been made of the materials 
used in the construction of this machine and much valuable information was 
secured. 

Few additions of note were made to the equipment of this Laboratory during 
the year. Provision has been made for the calibration of steel tapes, using as a 
standard a master tape calibrated by the Department of the Interior, Canada. 
The standards of one of the universal testing machines were extended to provide 
for tests upon line hardware assembled in place on transmission cable. This 
extension has proved very valuable. 

After some experience with the commercial type of ball and socket specimen 
holders used to prevent eccentric loading of the standard tension test specimen 
for metals, an improved form of this device was designed and built in the Labor- 
atory and embodied several special features. It could be used on any standard 
testing machine, it could be operated much more quickly than the usual type, it 
would not drop out of the grips and it was protected against the sudden shocks 
occurring when the test specimen ruptured. It is illustrated in a cut reproduced 
herewith. 

Standard instructions have been prepared for the use of the inspectors 
covering all of the principal materials usually inspected by this branch of the 
Laboratories. These instructions are prepared in loose leaf form, and are to be 
revised annually as necessary to keep them thoroughly up to date. 

Certain standards of materials and workmanship are necessary in the 
construction of any structure, and these are covered by the purchaser's specifica- 
tions. Many different specifications exist, all having the same standard of 
accomplishment in mind, but differing in some minor requirement or perhaps 
only in wording. During the year the inspection engineers of the Laboratories 
in co-operation with the designing engineers of the other departments have 
developed a set of standard clauses covering materials and workmanship for 
steel structures. Standard specifications for concrete are likewise in preparation. 



1923 



HYDRO-ELECTRIC POWER COMMISSION 



187 





188 FIFTEENTH ANNUAL REPORT OF THE No. 49 



Chemical Laboratory 

The activities of the Chemical Laboratory do not differ materially from year 
to year. Many different kinds of tests are carried out and valuable co-operation 
is given to the other Laboratories in connection with the problems upon which 
they are working. New materials of all kinds are referred to it by the Pur- 
chasing department for examination and report, and while none of these tests 
is of sufficient importance to warrant special mention, in the aggregate they 
form a considerable proportion of the total work done and are of great value to 
the Commission. 

Problems peculiar to the Chemical Laboratory are protective compounds 
and lubricating materials. The former includes paints, metallic coatings such 
as galvanizing and wood preservatives. Investigation work along each of these 
lines is in progress almost continuously. 

Photographic Branch 

This branch of the Laboratories has been very busy during the year, owing 
principally to the Queenston-Chippawa development. During the period of 
greatest activity weekly visits were made to Niagara by the photographer and at 
present progress pictures are being taken every month. A considerable number 
of airplane views of the development was taken during the summer. An "air- 
plane" map was also constructed showing the power canal and the Niagara 
river from Chippawa to Queenston ; the pictures for the map were taken from a 
height of 2,500 feet. For this work a special camera was built in the Laboratory 
workshop. Official pictures were also taken during the year of the 110,000- 
volt line from Queenston, the rural underground installation in Saltfleet town- 
ship, the new Hamilton outdoor station, and Ranney Falls generating station. 

The Blueprint section received 2,250 orders during the year. 



1923 HYDRO-ELECTRIC POWER COMMISSION 189 



SECTION IX 

FINANCIAL STATEMENTS 

EXPLANATORY STATEMENT RESPECTING THE ACCOUNTS 

The Hydro-Electric Power Commission of Ontario believes that a satis- 
factory understanding of the manner in which the various operations of the 
Commission are financed will contribute greatly to the interest of those engaged 
either directly or indirectly with the work of the Commission. 

In this section of its Annual Report the Commission presents detailed 
financial statements which may easily be understood although, upon casual 
inspection, they might appear somewhat complex. 

For the purpose of financial statement, the various systems are treated 
as quite separate units for each of which similar statements and details are 
given. Many of the pages which follow, therefore, simply repeat for each system 
the class of data which is presented for the first system dealt with, namely, the 
Niagara system. In order, therefore, to possess a ready grasp of all the figures 
presented in this and other similar reports of the Commission, all that is neces- 
sary is to have a true understanding of the financial procedure followed in 
connection with one system and with one municipality. 

The accounts of the Hydro-Electric Power Commission of Ontario are 
subjected to a strict audit by auditors specially appointed by the Provincial 
Government. The accounts of the individual municipalities are prepared 
according to approved and standard practice and are also duly audited. In 
fact, in preparing the various financial reports and statistical tables relating 
to all Hydro enterprises, the greatest care is exercised and all statements are 
presented in such form that they may be comprehensive and at the same time 
easily understood. 

It is proposed here to explain briefly the general plan of the financial 
operations of the Commission and in the course of the explanation to illustrate 
by reference to specific data. 

The balance sheet which immediately follows, exhibits the assets and 
liabilities of the Hydro-Electric Power Commission of Ontario in respect of 
all of its undertakings, except those of the "Central Ontario and Trent" and 
"Nipissing" systems — which owing to special conditions are separately sub- 
mitted — and of the Ontario Power Company, Limited, the financial report of 
which is separately presented at the end of this section of the Report. 

It will be understood that this statement of assets and liabilities and the 
financial tables which follow relate to the properties constructed and operated 
by the Commission as trustees for the municipalities; and the balance sheets, 
operating reports and statistical data appearing in Section X, under the heading 
of "Municipal Accounts," refer to the operation of the municipalities' properties 
within the boundaries of those municipalities which have contracted with the 
Commission for their supply of electrical energy. 



190 FIFTEENTH ANNUAL REPORT OF THE * No. 49 

The whole Hydro-Electric undertaking of the municipalities, so far as 
finances are concerned, is operated in what may be termed two distinct divisions: 
first — the division which covers the generation, transformation, and transmission 
of electrical energy, in wholesale quantities to municipalities. The equipment 
essential to this work is constructed, or otherwise provided, and also operated 
on behalf of the associated municipalities by the Hydro-Electric Power 
Commission of Ontario. 

The second division comprises the various operations involved in the local 
distribution by various municipal utility commissions, within their respective 
municipalities, of the electrical energy which they purchase from the Hydro- 
Electric Power Commission. The work performed by the various municipal 
commissions in their local distribution and sale of electrical energy is under the 
supervision of the Hydro-Electric Power Commission. 

To convey a better understanding respecting the operations of Hydro 
undertakings, the financial results of the two divisions just mentioned have 
been combined and are shown in balance sheet form immediately following 
statement "A" in Section X of this Report. These balance sheets are headed 
"Statement combining the Hydro-Electric Power Commission's plant and 
reserves with the assets, liabilities and reserves of the 'Hydro' Municipal Utilities 
as at 31st December, 1922," and information respecting the several columns of 
figures is given in a statement immediately preceding these balance sheets. 

The ultimate source of all revenue — whether for the larger operations of 
the Hydro-Electric Power Commission or for the smaller local operations of 
the municipalities — is, of course, the consumer. The revenue collected from 
the service supplied by the municipalities is divided so as to pay for the power 
purchased from the Commission and also for the expense incurred by the local 
utility in supplying its customers. 

The portion of the total revenue remitted to the Hydro-Electric Power 
Commission — and this remittance appears in the financial statements as the 
total "Cost of Power" — must be sufficient to pay the municipality's proportion 
of the expenditures made by the Commission on behalf of the municipality, 
in connection with the particular system to which the municipality belongs, 
in order to provide, transmit and sell to the municipality the agreed upon 
amount of power. This remittance to the Commission includes a sinking fund 
and a depreciation or renewals reserve fund ; the former making full provision 
for the liquidation of the capital investment and the latter creating a fund 
considered to be fully adequate to renew or rebuild any section of the various 
properties when necessary. The Hydro-Electric Power Commission of Ontario 
obtains its revenue from power service — that is from the sale of electricity 
generated for and transmitted to the municipalities in bulk — and with this 
revenue operates and maintains its system and also creates the reserves just 
mentioned. Power service is given to each municipality "at cost." 

All municipalities have current expenses to meet similar to the expenses of 
the Commission and have adopted the same sound financial procedure with 
respect to the operation of their local utilities. In other words, concurrently 
with the creation of funds to liquidate their debt to the Commission and provide 
a reserve to rebuild generating, transforming, and transmission systems, the 
municipalities are taking similar action with respect to their local Hydro systems. 

From the foregoing explanation it will be seen that the revenue obtained 
from "Hydro" light and power customers is sufficient to meet all operating 
and maintenance costs and capital charges in connection with (a) individual 
municipal investments and (b) collective municipal investments made through 



1923 HYDRO-ELECTRIC POWER COMMISSION 191 

the agency of the Hydro-Electric Power Commission, and in addition there is 
being provided a fund for the purpose of renewing or rebuilding the properties — 
if necessary — of the whole Hydro installation from the generating stations to 
and including the municipal systems. 

It will be profitable to consider, very briefly, the basic principle upon which 
the whole Hydro project is founded. This is set out in the contracts under 
which the municipalities enter into the partnership of which the Commission acts 
as trustee. The rates at which power is supplied to the various municipalities 
vary with the amount of power used and the distance from the source of supply. 
The entire capital cost of the various power developments and transmission 
systems are pro-rated annually to the connected municipalities, according 
to the relative use made of the lines and equipment. Each municipality is 
required to assume responsibility for just that portion of capital employed in 
delivering electrical energy to it, together with such expenses as are incident to 
that particular portion of the investment. Municipalities are not charged with 
expenses connected with equipment or plant from which they derive no benefit 
or are in no way interested. The entire annual expense of operation, mainten- 
ance, administration, interest and sinking fund and full depreciation are paid 
out of revenue collected from the municipalities, through the medium of thirteen 
power bills rendered by the Commission each year. Power bills are rendered 
at an interim estimated rate each month during the year and a thirteenth bill — 
or credit memorandum as the case may be — is rendered at the end of the year, 
when the Commission's books are closed and the actual cost determined.* 
There is no burden on the taxpayers or on non-users and no avenue through 
which losses, should they occur, could be absorbed, except by a direct charge to 
the contracting municipalities for power supplied. It should be noted that the 
sinking fund on the debentures is treated as an operating expense and that, 
therefore, the municipalities are not only paying the interest on the investment, 
but are also paying off the principal by means of a sinking fund and, in 
addition, are providing for the perpetuity of the system through an adequate 
depreciation fund. 

The results obtained by the annual adjustments of the Commission's capital 
investment, operating expenses and fixed charges as they affect individual 
municipalities are clearly shown in the tables for the respective systems. 

These financial statements are typical of others appearing in this section of 
the Commission's Annual Report, and if their significance is fully appreciated 
there can be no misconception of the relationship of the municipalities to the 
Commission's operations. 

To further illustrate the foregoing explanatory comments a typical Operat- 
ing Report is now submitted, viz., that of the Hydro-Electric Utility of the 
city of Sarnia: 

•The financial year for the Commission accounts ends on October 31. The financial year for the Municipal 
accounts, however, ends on December 31, and the Municipal accounts are made up to this date, and so recorded in 
Section X. 



J92 FIFTEENTH ANNUAL REPORT OF THE No. 49 

SARNIA HYDRO SYSTEM 

OPERATING STATEMENT FOR THE YEAR 1922 

REVENUE 
Revenue from Sarnia Hydro customers, for year $198,856.82 

EXPENSES 

Representative illustration of expenses incurred by Hydro- 
Electric Power Commission on behalf of a municipality in 
connection with the supplying of its electrical energy. These 
data really show — as determined by annual adjustment — what 
it costs the Commission to supply the municipality with its' 
power. See Annual Adjustment Statement, 'page 206 for the 
city of Sarnia as follows: 
Cost (pro. share) of generating and transform- 
ing at Niagara Falls, Ontario $55,325.76 

Cost (pro. share) of administering, maintain- 
ing and operating Commission's trans- 
former stations and transmission lines . . . 22_,457.89 
Interest on Sarnia's proportionate share of 

capital investment in stations and lines. . 19,941.89 
Renewal reserves (pro. share) yearly provision 

for plant renewal purposes 5,459.62 

Contingencies (pro. share) yearly provision.. . 3,297.90 

Payments to sinking fund (pro. share) 5,786.99 

$112,270.05 

Expenses incurred by a municipality through its utility 
commission in connection with the sale of electrical energy to 
consumers. Consult the section dealing with the Municipal 
Accounts: 

Operation, maintenance and administrative 

expenses, etc $40,386.99 

Interest and fixed charges on debenture debt. 25,833.00 

Depreciation charge 9,662.00 

$75,881.99 

Total expenses charged against the re- 
venue from customers of the Sarnia 
system $188,152.04 



Net surplus for the year $10,704.78 



1923 HYDRO-ELECTRIC POWER COMMISSION 193 

The city of Sarnia situated at the extreme end of the Niagara system, 
185 miles distant from source of power, Niagara Falls, Ontario, was connected to 
the system, December, 1916. This utility has fulfilled every monetary obliga- 
tion imposed upon it by the Power Commission Act. With the close of the 
sixth year of operation its financial condition as set forth in the municipalities 
balance sheet (see Statement A, in Section X) stands as follows. 

Total assets, $542,157.76; total liabilities, $283,935.37; reserves and surplus, 
$258,222.39. The last mentioned figure comprises the following items: 

Debentures paid $ 39,092.81 

Reserve for renewal of plant (local) 57,040.00 

Sinking fund equity in Hydro-Electric Power Com- 
mission system 14,142.76 

Surplus 147,946.82 



$258,222.39 






In addition to these reserves the Hydro-Electric Power Commission of 
Ontario has collected from this utility during the period under review the sum of 
156,621.58 which represents Sarnia's proportionate share of renewals reserve 
retained by the Commission for purposes as hereinbefore mentioned. 



7 H.C. 



]94 FIFTEENTH ANNUAL REPORT OF THE No. 49 

HYDRO-ELECTRIC POWER 

Detailed Statement of Assets 

POWER 

Assets 
Niagara Svstem: 

Right-of-way $1,670,895.30 

Steel-Tower Lines 5,622,611.87 

Transformer Stations 10,779,068.25 

Wood-Pole Lines 2,806, 734 . 49 



Rural Construction $307,41 1 . 13 

Rural Lines ■{ Rural Power Districts Con- 

[ struction 532,129.72 



$20,879,309.91 



839,540.85 



$21,718,850.76 



Niagara Power Development Works: 

Expenditure to date on Construction Work at Niagara 

Falls 65,642,615.86 

Severn System: 

Power Development $654,286. 51 

Wood-Pole Lines 566,276 . 93 

Transformer Stations 211,549.91 



$1,432,113.35 
Rural Power Districts Construction 10,188.55 



Eugenia System: 

Power Development $994,737.54 

Wood-Pole Lines 804,940.51 

Transformer Stations 261,265.66 



$2,060,943.71 

Rural Lines 2,239 . 07 

Rural Power Districts 3,070. 83 



Wasdells Svstem: 

Power Development $144,379 . 35 

Wood-Pole Lines 203,186 . 79 

Transformer Stations 31 ,485 . 22 



1,442,301.90 



2,066,253.61 



$379,051.36 
Rural Lines 14,955 . 95 



Muskoka System: 

Power Development $148,473 . 74 

Wood-Pole Lines 54,420. 23 

Transformer Stations 9,896 . 85 



St. Lawrence System: 

Wood-Pole Lines $521,052 . 01 

Transformer Stations 484,747 . 25 



394,007.31 



212,790.82 



$1,005,799.26 
Rural Power Districts Construction 29,462 . 82 



Rideau System: 

Power Development $756,926 . 70 

Wood-Pole Lines 261 ,964 . 20 

Transformer Stations 60,855 . 90 



1,035,262.08 






Thunder Bay System: 

Power Development (Nipigon River) $5,772,133.31 

Transmission Lines " " (Port Arthur) 602,161.90 

Transformer Station " " " " 149,681.01 

Transformer Station (Port Arthur) 89,317.45 

Transmission Lines " " 29,476.46 



1,079,746.80 



6,642,770.13 



923 



HYDRO-ELECTRIC POWER COMMISSION 



95 



COMMISSION OF ONTARIO 

and Liabilities— 31st October, 1922 

UNDERTAKINGS 

Liabilities 

Provincial Treasurer: 

Cash Advances for Niagara and other Systems $44,938,798 . 24 

Cash Advances for Niagara Power Development Works. . 61,278,545.52 

$106 

Unexpended portion of the sum appropriated by the Legislature to cover ex- 
penditures by the Commission on account of the Province 

Bank of Montreal : 

Cash Advances re Construction of Third Pipe Line on 

Ontario Power Company's Property 1 

Debentures issued to cover purchase of Capital Stock of 

Ontario Power Company of Niagara Falls $8,000,000. 00 

Interest accrued thereon 80,000. 00 

Debentures issued to cover the purchase price of the Capital 
stock of The Toronto Power Co., Ltd., and in certain 
Electrical Power Equipment of the Toronto and York 

Radial Railway $619,000 .00 

Interest accrued thereon 15,475 .00 

Debentures issued for the purpose of retiring the 1921 issue of 

the Ontario Power Company of Niagara Falls $3,200,000 . 00 

Interest accrued thereon. . . 67,856. 16 

: 3 

Debentures issued to cover purchase price of Essex System. . $226,000.00 

Interest accrued thereon 3,875 . 00 

Debentures issued to cover purchase price of Thorold System. $100,000.00 

Interest accrued thereon 1,666 . 67 

Debentures Assumed : 

Line to Brick Companies at Streetsville $4,267.26 

Muskoka Power Development 40,678 . 96 

$44,946.22 
Interest accrued thereon 1,605.45 

Accounts Payable $190,938 . 84 

Bond Interest Coupons Overdue, but not presented 59,016.50 

Cash on deposit on account of Central Ontario System 

Insurance Department: 

Outstanding Claims and Awards $618,547 . 86 

Surplus 38,197.54 

Balances due to Municipalities in respect of amounts paid by 

them to 31st October, 1922, in excess of the cost of power 

supplied to them as provided to be paid under Section 23 

of the Act: 

Niagara System '. $110,368. 85 

Severn System Ill, 145 . 03 

Eugenia System 27,830.22 

Wasdells System 1,682 . 25 

Muskoka System 11,534.56 

St. Lawrence System 25,945 . 04 

Rideau System 30,504.78 

Ottawa System (Nepean District) 590. 66 



217,343.76 
58,230.11 

,200,000.00 
8,080,003.03 

634,475 .00 

267,856.16 
229,875.00 
101,666.67 



46,551.67 

249,955.34 
363,400.20 

656,745.43 



319,601.39 



196 



FIFTEENTH ANNUAL REPORT OF THE 



No. 49 



HYDRO-ELECTRIC POWER 
Detailed Statement of Assets 

POWER UNDER 



Assets 



Ottawa System: 

Meters, etc 

Rural Power Districts 



$2,748.91 
23,200.83 



Bonnechere River Storage System : 

Round Lake Dam 

Golden Lake Dam 

Interest on above to 31st December, 1916 

Essex System; 

Purchase price of System 

Additional Expenditure to date 



$20,292.68 

11,092.81 

2,780.25 



$226,000.00 
115,960.09 



Thorold System: 

Purchase price of System 

Less: Credit Balance on Current Account 



Service Buildings: 

Service Building and Equipment, Toronto 

Equipment of Storehouse and Garage, Hamilton 
Pole Yard and Equipment, Cobourg 



Office Buildings: 

On University Avenue, Toronto 

On Corner Elm Street antd Centre Avenue, Toronto . 

Office Furniture and Equipment: 

At Toronto Office 

At Hamilton Office 

At Electrical Inspection Offices 

Library 

Stationery and Office Supplies 



$100,000.00 
81,429.53 



$466,900.43 

9,473.74 

20,070.79 



$499,000.29 
161,356.87 



$104,852.52 

2,157.61 

5,330.70 

2,172.38 

23,850.79 



Automobile and Trucks 

Inventories: 

Construction and Maintenance, Tools and Equipment 

Construction Material and Sundry Supplies 

Maintenance Materials and Supplies 



$264,068.28 
761,611.99 
255,326.21 



•Capital Stock of Ontario Power Company of Niagara Falls 

Investment of Capital Stock of Toronto Power Company, Ltd., and in certain 
Electrical Power Equipment of the Toronto and York Radial Railway .... 
Ontario Power Company of Niagara Falls: 
Re 6 per cent. 1941 Debentures issued by 
the Commission for the purpose of 
retiring the 1921 issue of the Power 

Company $3,200,000 .00 

Interest accrued thereon 67,856 .16 

$3,267,856.16 



Expenditure in connection with construc- 
tion of Third Pipe Line $3,514,676 .62 

Accrued Interest on $8,000,000 Bonds 
issued by the Commission to cover 
the purchase price of the Capital 
Stock of the Power Company 80,000 .00 



Current Account 



3,594,676.62 
344,602 .49 



The Toronto Power Co., Ltd., Current Account 

Toronto and York Radial Co., Current Account 

Sinking Fund: 

On deposit with Provincial Treasurer, including interest 
allowed thereon 

Invested in Securities of the Province of Ontario which are 
deposited with the Provincial Treasurer — par value 
$827,000.00 

Interest accrued thereon 



$638,699.16 



827,000.00 
18,964.03 



$25,949.74 



34,165.74 



341,960.09 



18,570.47 



496,444.96 



660,357.16 






138,364.00 
8,491.30 



1,281,006.48 
8,000,000.00 

619,258.00 



7,207,135.27 

191,820.96 

59,375 .00 



1,484,663.19 



$1,979,824.85 



120,054.10 



1923 HYDRO-ELECTRIC POWER COMMISSION [97 

COMMISSION OF ONTARIO 

and Liabilities — 31st October, 1922 — Continued 

TAKINGS— Continued 

Liabilities 

Reserves for Sinking Fund: 
Municipalities — 

Niagara System $1,740,390. 63 

Niagara Rural Lines 40,142.80 

Severn System 83,613.38 

Eugenia System 38,857 . 68 

Eugenia Rural Lines 190. 18 

Wasdells System 17,137.42 

Wasdells Rural Lines 885 . 27 

Muskoka System 4,524.03 

St. Lawrence System 27,677 . 90 

St. Lawrence Rural Lines 

Thunder Bay System 22,115 .45 

Ottawa System . 353 . 12 

Bonnechere Storage System 3,936.99 

Service and Office Buildings — 

Service Buildings $52,676 . 94 

Office Buildings 67,377 . 16 

Reserves for Renewals: 

Contributed by Municipalities — 

Niagara System $2,475,421.02 

Severn System 132,743 . 72 

Eugenia System 137,200.69 

Wasdells System 35,564.12 

Muskoka System 15,215 . 17 

St. Lawrence System 64,743 . 78 

Rideau System 33,771 . 00 

Thunder Bay System 42,433 .51 

Ottawa System 434 . 59 

In respect of Service and Office Buildings — 

Service Buildings $111,984.52 

Office Buildings 12,303 . 55 

Reserves for Contingencies: 

Niagara System $4,853 . 87 

Severn System 29,220.08 

Eugenia System 12,801.38 

Wasdells System 6,068 . 13 

Muskoka System 3,375 . 57 

St. Lawrence System 6,255 . 17 

Rideau System 7,673 . 25 

Thunder Bay System 4,601 . 65 

— 74,849 . 10 

Interest reserved for the benefit and credit of Municipalities which have paid 
Sinking Funds — being the Interest return from the Investment of such 
funds in excess of the 4 per cent. Interest already allowed by the Com- 
mission thereon 13,083 . 97 

Surplus arising from Departmental Operations in Service Buildings 22,168. 26 



2,937,527.60 



124,288.07 



198 FIFTEENTH ANNUAL REPORT OF THE No. 49 

HYDRO-ELECTRIC POWER 
Detailed Statement of Assets 

POWER UNDER 

Assets 

Investments: 

Debentures of the Hydro-Electric Power Commission pur- 
chased (issued in connection with the purchase of 
Capital Stock of the Ontario Power Company) par 

value $115,000.00 $79,844.50 

Interest accrued thereon 1,150.00 

$80,994.50 

Cash: 

In Banks $1,453,407 . 64 

In hands of employees as advances on account of expenses 1 19,937 . 87 

In Bank to pay Bond Interest Coupons overdue, but not 

presented 59,016 . 50 



1,632,362.01 



Accounts Receivable: 

Due by Municipalities in respect of Con. 

struction Work and Supply Sales .... $563,402 .07 
Less: Reserve for Doubtful Accounts ... . 11,288.36 



$552,113.71 

Due by Municipalities in respect of Power Accounts 1,185,061 .22 

"Sinking Fund and Interest" and "Consumers" Accounts 

owing in respect of Rural Lines 78,838 . 82 

Due by Town of Renfrew for Water from Bonnechere 

Storage System for power purposes 7,116. 75 

Balances due by Municipalities in respect of the Costs of 
Power supplied to them, as provided to be paid under 
Section 23 of the Act : 

Niagara System $343,650 .35 

Severn System 14,620 .23 

St. Lawrence System 10,517 .08 

Wasdell System 6,634 .10 

Eugenia System 33,761 .96 

Muskoka System 3,784.15 



412,967.87 



Walkerton Quarry Mortgage, securing Balance of Sale Price . . . $260,000 .00 

Interest accrued thereon 10,670. 69 



2,236,098.37 



270,670.69 



Amount recoverable out of future revenues from the City of Port Arthur, and 
other Power Customers on The Thunder Bay System — being that portion 
of the interest on the Nipigon Development which was deferred as at 
31st October, 1922 318,320.65 

Receivable from the Province of Ontario as the amount owing ^ ■* 
under the Rural Hydro-Electric Power Distribution Act 
of 1921 in respect of bonus to primary rural lines com- 
pleted and in operation on 31st October, 1922 202,953 .07 

Balance on interest account to be charged against 

operations in the year following , 49,674 .94 

Work in Progress: 

Expenditure on account of various Systems chargeable 
upon completion to — 

Capital Construction $64,624 .23 

Operating and Maintenance Expenses 3,896.93 

$68,521.16 

Insurance Unexpired 49,672 . 42 



1923 HYDRO-ELECTRIC POWER COMMISSION 199 

COMMISSION OF ONTARIO 

and Liabilities — 31st October, 1922 — Continued 

TA KINGS— Continued 

Liabilities 

Contingent Liabilities: 

In respect of Contracts entered into, for works under 

construction $2, 140,835 . 17 

In respect of outstanding Bonds of The Ontario Power 
Company of Niagara Falls, and the Ontario Trans- 
mission Company, Limited 10,691,000.00 



200 FIFTEENTH ANNUAL REPORT OF THE No. 49 

HYDRO-ELECTRIC POWER 
Detailed Statement of Assets 

RADIAL RAILWA Y 
Assets 
Sandwich, Windsor and Amherstburg Railway: 

Cost of Capital Stock, and Plant Assets of Company. . . . $2,039,000.00 
Advances for Construction and Exten- 
sions and Operations $1,100,000.00 

Less : Current Account 40,997 . 95 

$1,059,002.05 

Guelph Radial Railway: * $3,098,002.05 

Purchase price of Railway $150,000 . 00 

Less : Instalments paid 5,005 . 69 

$144,994.31 

Proceeds of Sale of Bonds $150,000 . 00 

Proceeds of Loan from Bank of Montreal 115,000. 00 

265,000.00 
Less: Cash held by the Commission. . . . 8,021.57 

256,978.43 

York Radial Railways: 401,972.74 

Purchase price of Road and Equipment of the Metropolitan, Scarboro 

and Mimico Divisions 2,375,000 .00 

Port Credit to St. Catharines Radial Railway: 

Expended upon purchase of Right-of-way $71,299.02 

Construction materials purchased 281,882 . 06 

Surveying, Engineering, Administrative Expenses and 

Interest 128,01 1 . 29 

481,192.37 

Toronto to Port Credit Radial Railway : 

Expended upon purchase of Right-of-way $631,231 .87 

Surveying, Engineering, Administrative Expenses and 

Interest • 148,803 . 87 

780,035.74 

Expended prior to 31st October, 1921, in connection with 

investigations, surveys, by-laws and reports on proposed 

Radial Railways _ . $151,871 .77 

Expended prior to 31st October, 1921, in connection with 
preparation of information for a submission of evidence 
to the Royal Commission which investigated Hydro 
Radial Railways 335,123 .93 

$486,995 .70 
Less cash advances by the Province on account of the above. 150,000.00 

336,995.70 
Interest added thereto in year 21,904.72 

Balance carried as recoverable from the Province of Ontario 358,900 .42 

$133,206,532.76 

NIAGARA 

Operating Account for Year 

Costs of Operation as Provided for under Sections 6c and 23 of the Act 

Power Purchased ;•••••. : • • $3,848,497.60 

Costs of operating and maintaining the Transmission Lines, Stations, etc., 

including the proportion of Administrative Expenses chargeable to the 

operation of this System ' 765,775 . 23 

Interest on Capital Investment 726, 107 .61 

Provision for Renewal of Lines, Stations, etc 195,255.52 

Provision for Contingencies: 

By charges against Municipalities $190,416.40 

By charges against contracts with Private Companies which 

purchased power 31,275.20 

Provision for Sinking Fund: — 221,691.60 

By charges against Municipalities $211,587.56 

By charges against contracts with Private Companies which 

purchased power 42,555.81 

254,143.37 

$6,011,470.93 



1923 HYDRO-ELECTRIC POWER COMMISSION 20] 

COMMISSION OF ONTARIO 

and Liabilities — 31st October, 1922 — Continued 

UNDERTAKINGS 

Liabilities 

In respect of the Sandwich, Windsor and Amherstburg Railway: 
Debentures issued to cover purchase price of Capital 

Stock and Plant Assets $2,039,000.00 

Interest accrued thereon 7,646 . 25 

$2,046,646.25 

Debentures issued for the purpose of making extensions 

and betterments $900,000.00 

Interest accrued thereon 18,020. 55 

918,020.55 

Bank of Montreal— Advances 200,000.00 

(Secured by hypothecation of $261,000.00 Hydro Radial Debentures 
issued by Commission and $190,000.00 Debentures of City of Windsor) 
In respect of the Guelph Radial Railway: 

City of Guelph — Purchase price of Rail- 
way payable thereto, in half yearly 
instalments, according to purchase 
agreement $150,000.00 

Less : Instalments paid '. 5,005 . 69 

144,994.31 

Debentures issued by the Commission for the purpose of 

making extensions and betterments 150,000. 00 

Bank of Montreal— Advances 115,000.00 

(Secured by hypothecation of $150,000.00 Guelph 409,994.31 

Radial Railway Debentures issued by the Com- 
mission.) 
In respect of York Radial Railways: 

Debentures issued to cover the purchase price of the Road 
and Equipment on the Metropolitan, Scarboro and 
Mimico Divisions $2,375,000 .00 

Accrued interest thereon 59,375 .00 

2,434,375.00 

In respect of the Port Credit to St. Catharines Radial Railway: 

Bank of Montreal— Advances 500,000. 00 

(Secured by hypothecation of $1,200,000.00 Hydro Radial Debentures, 
being part of issue of $11,360,363.00 guaranteed by Province of 
Ontario) 

Contingent Liability: 

In respect of Contracts entered into for Construction Materials $82,756.25 



$133,206,532.76 



SYSTEM 

Ended 31st October, 1922 

Revenue for Period 

Collected from Municipalities $4,959,172.76 

Power sold to Private Companies 698,569.58 

Add: Amounts due by certain Municipalities, being the difference 
between sums paid and the Costs of Power supplied to them 
in the year $307,322 . 34 

Deduct: Amounts collected from certain Municipalities in excess 
of the sums required to be paid by them for power supplied 

in the year 110,182.33 

197,140.01 

Revenue $5,854,882.35 

Loss on Sale of Power supplied to Private Companies (written off to Contingency 

Reserve) 156,588.58 



$6,011,470.93 



202 



FIFTEENTH ANNUAL REPORT OF THE 



No. 49 



NIAGARA 

Statement Showing the Amount to be Paid by Each Municipality as the Cost — under 

Received by the Commission from Each Municipality on Account of such Cost, 

upon Ascertainment (by Annual Adjustment) of the Actual Cost 



Municipality 



Interim Rates per 
Horsepower col- 
lected by Com- 
mission during 
year 



To 

Dec. 31, 

1921 



To 

Oct. 31. 
1922 



Share of 
Capital Cost 
of system on 

which 
interest and 

fixed 

charges are 

payable 



Horse- 
power 
supplied in 
year after 
correction 
for power 
factor 



Cost of 
Power to 
Com- 
mission 



Share of Operating 



Operating 
Main- 
tenance 

and 
Adminis- 
trative 
Expenses 



Acton ..... 
Ailsa Craig, 
Alvinston . . 

Aylmer 

Ayr 



$ c. 
32.00 
49.00 



Baden 
Beachville, 
Blenheim. 
Bolton 
Bothwell. . 



Brampton 
Brantford. . . . 

Brigden . 

Burford 

Burgessville. . 

Caledonia 

Chatham 

Chippawa Vil 

Clinton 

Comber 



Dashwood 

Delaware 

Dereham Twp 
Dorchester . . . 
Drayton 



Dresden. . 
Drumbo. . 
Dublin... 
Dundas. . 
Dunnville. 



Dutton ..... 

Elmira 

Elora 

Embro 

EtobicokeTwp 



Exeter 

Fergus 

Forest 

Gait 

Georgetown 



Glencoe . . . 
Goderich. . 
Granton. . . 

Guelph 

Hag^rsville 



45.00 
50.00 

32.00 
30.00 
53.00 
60.00 
60.00 

20.00 
20.00 
60.00 
70.00 
48.00 

24.00 
28.00 
(see end 
46.00 
60.00 

56.00 

85.00 
37.00 
50.00 
70.00 

38.00 
55.00 
60.00 
17.00 
40.00 

40.00 
38.00 
40.00 
75.00 
27.00 

41.00 
44.00 
60.00 
21.00 
35.00 

78.35 
50.00 
55.00 
20.00 
36.00 



$ c. 
37.00 
49.00 
95.95 
50.00 
50.00 

36.00 
37.00 
54.00 
60.00 
55.00 

26.00 
25.00 
66.00 
70.00 
52.00 

29.00 
31.00 
of this 
48.00 
60.00 

62.00 
85.00 
37.00 
50.00 
72.00 

38.00 
55.00 
70.00 
22.00 
50.00 

44.00 
38.00 
44.00 
80.00 
27.00 

46.00 
47.00 
60.00 
25.00 
38.00 

76.00 
55.00 
55.00 
25.00 
36.00 



$ c. 
36,641.23 
37,377.93 
31,099.14 
54,655.55 
16,664.90 

28,038.14 
31,680.56 
38,988.04 
40,473.99 

33,282.72 

102,723.76 

330,713.15 

28,448.61 

26,054.44 

7,044.95 

8,596.55 
297,627.44 

table) 

43,720.45 
29,223.71 

20,783.97 
4,673.66 

10,347.66 
4,354.97 

26,643.07 

25,274.24 
5,561.28 
10,235.89 
55,004.14 
82,816.04 

18,405.16 
56,931.42 
42,935.43 
18,730.91 
46,617.14 

53,603.18 

39,779.67 

44,778.77 

273,913.77 

104,191.96 

36,947.74 
147,283.42 

13,783.69 
287,598.30 

58.143.55 



249.1 
124.4 

25.9 
199.6 

79.9 

210.4 
271.1 
176.9 
114.1 
136.5 

997 

,152.6 
55.6 
52.1 
25.3 

101.1 

,742.9 



$ c. 
4,178.92 
2,086.94 
434.50 
3,348.50 
1,340.41 

3,529.68 
4,547.99 
2,967.69 
1,914.15 
2,289.93 

16,739.15 

86,440.31 

932.75 

874.03 

424.43 

1,696.06 
46,015.05 



$ c. 
1,811.56 
1,177.87 
1,322.24 
2,525.18 
1,027.17 

1,770.56 
2,210.01 
2,334.59 
873.02 
1,634.83 

4,785.43 

16,193.37 

1,297.01 

887.79 

541.63 

374.51 
13,076.05 



174.8 
104.7 

47.2 
134 
57.4 
23.9 
51.3 

160.5 
26.5 
28 
1,173 

296.3 

109.7 
417.5 
244.1 
51.3 
517 

204.5 
218.0 
130.3 
3,616.2 
563.1 

72 
460.3 

44 
4,458 
428.9 



2,932.46 
1,756.45 

791.83 
219.77 
962.95 
400.95 
860.61 

2,692.56 

444.56 

471.41 

19,691.74 

4,970.75 

1,840.33 
7,004.00 
4,095.04 
860.61 
8,681.62 

3,430.70 

3,657.18 

2,185.92 

60,665.58 

9,446.60 

1,216.26 

7,722.02 

751.57 

74,794.37 

7.195.25 



2,232.28 
1,077.60 

913.82 
224.03 
1,055.27 
431.50 
927.26 

1,475.99 

333.89 

905.77 

2,692.95 

1,096.38 

1,413.18 
3,245.64 
1,767.62 
1,032.13 
3,736.68 

1,857.71 
1,762.98 
2,354.01 
14,826.07 
4,031.40 

1,233.44 

6,626.49 

586.63 

17,483.67 

1,913.73 



1923 



HYDRO-ELECTRIC FOWER COMMISSION 



203 



SYSTEM 

Section 23 of the Act — of Power Supplied to it by the Commission, the Amount 
and the Amount remaining to be Credited or Charged to Each Municipality 
of Power Supplied to it in the Year Ending 31st October, 1922 



Costs and Fixed Charges. 



Renewals 


Contin- 




gencies 


$ c. 


$ c. 


408.73 


249.10 


441.98 


124.40 


277.86 


25.90 


652.83 


199.60 


196.17 


79.90 


318.14 


210.40 


351.92 


271.10 


454.99 


176.90 


486.77 


114.10 


385.23 


136.50 


924.56 


997.80 


3,351.48 


5,152.60 


341.87 


55.60 


317.78 


52.10 


84.22 


25.30 


92.06 


101.10 


3,040.88 


2,742.90 


519.90 


174.80 


339.36 


104.70 


249.63 


47.20 


55.77 


13.10 


120.61 


57.40 


46.93 


23.90 


325.23 


51.30 


276.24 


160.50 


65.50 


26.50 


123.68 


28.10 


508.83 


1,173.80 


1,034.59 


296.30 


213.37 


109.70 


648.21 


417.50 


488.40 


244.10 


226.33 


51.30 


493.96 


517.50 


628.54 


204.50 


454.11 


218.00 


527.51 


130.30 


2,799.82 


3,616.20 


1,191.00 


563.10 


445.49 


72.50 
460.30 


1.771.00 


163.20 


44.80 


2,712.96 


4,458.40 


661.49 


428.90 



Sinking 
Fund 



$ c. 
534.88 
480.09 



227.20 

441.97 

555.32 
634.81 
698.48 
646.39 

1,331.37 
3,381.90 



Total Cost 

of Power 

for year as 

provided 

to be paid 

under 

Section 23 

of Act 



283.86 
64.78 

132.37 
3,612.55 



$ c. 
8,676.62 
5,894.36 
3,044.26 
9,067.91 
3,578.92 

7,436.78 
9,234.63 
8,209.39 
5,825.00 
6,478.85 

28,251.83 

127,448.07 

3,842.82 

3,545.60 

1,442.35 

2,742.36 
79,793.51 



Amounts 
paid to the 
Com- 
mission 
by each 
municipal- 
ity 



9,005.56 
6,096.63 
2,489.89 
9,803.84 
3,994.56 

7,416.63 
9,768.40 
9,519.76 
6,847.35 
7,627.90 

26,197.94 

124,256.96 

3,583.89 

3,646.97 

1,298.82 

2,851.05 
83.886.13 



Amounts remaining to 
be credited or charged 
to each municipality 
upon ascertainment of 

the actual Cost 

of Power by annual 

adjustment 



Credited 



» c. 
328.94 
202.27 



735.93 
415.64 



533.77 
1,310.37 
1,022.35 
1,149.05 



Charged 



$ c. 



554.37 



20.15 



SinkingFund 

for the years 

mentioned 

hereunder 

charged as 

part of the 

Cost of 

Power 

in the year 

1921-1922 



101.37 



108.69 
4,092.62 



2,053.89 

3,191.11 

258.93 



143.53 



1920-21 
1917-18 



1918-19 

1920-21 
1920-21 
1917-18 
1917-18 
1917-18 

1921-22 
1918-19 



1917-18 
1916-17 

1920-21 
1917-18 



725.78 
304.33 



69.94 
79.49 



415.81 
78.80 



732.71 



310.21 
656.96 
744.98 
319.98 



2,547.49 
544.46 



4,031.74 
1,491.13 



2,583.27 
191.69 

3,906.66 
679.25 



8,453.66 
4,799.97 

2,891.55 
781.79 
2,633.38 
1,153.23 
3,320.46 

6,028.72 

1,185.64 

1,970.48 

26,848.79 

11,039.77 

4,661.93 

14,345.36 

9,112.92 

3,298.30 

15,282.11 

10,926.30 

8,283.07 

7,083.20 

96,588.66 

21,039.18 

4,551.74 

25,498.07 

2,322.20 

113,884.47 

13.301.21 



8,079.85 
6,279.40 

2,873.58 
1,116.99 
2,123.13 
1,196.63 
3,678.87 

6,099.20 

1,458.39 

1,917.22 

25,130.21 

14,256.25 

4,753.06 
15,863.73 
10,593.23 

4,071.91 
13,972.48 

9,248.94 
10,124.95 

7,816.00 
91,270.11 
21,095.68 

5,541.64 

24,195.54 

2,464.45 

107,621.52 

15,438.81 



373.81 



1,479.43 



17.97 



335.20 



510.25 



43.40 
358.41 

70.48 

272.75 



3,216.48 

91.13 

1,518.37 

1,480.31 

773.61 



53.26 
1,718.58 



1,309.63 
1,677.36 



1,841.88 
732.80 



5,318.55 



56.50 
989.90 



142.25 
'2.137.60 



1,302.53 



6.262.95 



1918-19 
1917-18 



1917-18 
1918-i9 



1917-18 
1918-19 



1921-22 



1917-18 
1919-20 
1918-19 
1918-19 



1916-17 
1918-19 



1921-22 
1919-20 



1918-19 
1916-17 
1921-22 
1919-20 



204 



FIFTEENTH ANNUAL REPORT OF THE 



No. 49 



NIAGARA 

Statement Showing the Amount to be Paid by Each Municipality as the Cost — under 

Received by the Commission from Each Municipality on Account of such Cost, 

upon Ascertainment (by Annual Adjustment) of the Actual Cost 



Municipality 



Hamilton. 
Harriston. 
Hensall. . 
Hespeler. 
Highgate . 



Ingersoll. 
Kitchener 
Lambeth . 
Listowel. . 
London. . 



Interim Rates per 
Horsepower col- 
lected by Com- 
mission during 
year 



To 

Dec. 31, 

1921 



London Railway 
Commission. . . 

Lucan 

Lynden 

Markham 

Milton 



Milverton 

Mimico 

Mitchell 

Moorefield 

Mount Brydges. 

Newbury 

New Hamburg. . 
New Toronto . . . 
Niagara Falls. . . 
Niagara-on-Lake 



Norwich 

Oil Springs . 
Otterville.. 
Palmerston 
Paris 



Parkhill.. .. 
Petrolia 
Plattsville. . 
Port Credit. 
Port Dover. 



Port Stanley . 

Preston 

Princeton 

Queenston. . . 
Ridgetown . . 



Rockwood . 
Rodney. . . 
St. George. 
St. Jacobs. 
St. Marys. 



To 

Oct. 31, 
1922 



$ c. 
16.00 
55.00 
57.00 
23.00 
55.00 

23.00 
20.00 
75.00 
37.00 
20.00 

15.00+ 

kw-hr 

35.00 

50.00 

77.74 
28.00 

35.00 
21.00 
36.00 
70.00 
70.00 

67.10 
32.00 
22.00 
12.50 
28.00 

35.00 
43.00 
50.00 
45.00 
21.00 

75.00 
36.00 
65.00 
23.00 
62.00 

53.00 
22.00 
90.00 
18.42 
45.00 

55.00 
55.00 
45.00 
35.00 
32.00 



Share of 
Capital Cost 
of system on 

which 
interest and 

fixed 

charges are 

payable 



Horse- 
power 
supplied in 
year after 
correction 
for power 
factor 



$ c 

20.00 

50.00 

64.00 

29.00 

55.00 

29.00 
25.00 
75.00 
37.00 
25.00 

15.00+ 
kw-hr 
38.00 
50.00 
70.00 
32.00 

35.00 
26.00 
37.00 
70.00 
76.00 

67.10 
38.00 
26.00 
17.50 
26.00 

39.00 
48.00 
52.00 
45.00 
26.00 

75.00 
36.00 
75.00 
28.00 
62.00 

50.00 
27.00 
90.00 
18.42 
45.00 

65.00 
55.00 
49.00 
40.00 
35.001 



$ c. 
1,506,231.82 
52,313.23 
24,157.00 
37,494.33 
14,204.31 

101,737.64 

517,005.12 

11,024.12 

74,520.49 

1,079,944.93 



138,090.46 
30,293.63 
24,206.53 
18,974.76 

103,995.01 

52,123.10 
58,465.72 
33,708.58 
14,060.06 
9,739.76 

9,378.28 

35,102.77 

171,347.96 

39,269.58 

7,998.19 

38,139.16 
39,503.84 
10,173.58 
40,943.24 
65,850.42 

34,399.18 
93,825.09 
15,561.28 
21,430.11 
20,483.53 

42,727.88 

128,079.07 

9,294.16 

800.07 

40,667.08 

14,590.85 

15,981.58 

6,471.84 

10,143.36 

106,761.28 



18,832.2 

191.2 

54.7 

447.7 
42.8 

1,197.8 

7,312.0 

30.9 

412.8 

15,137.0 



Cost of 
Power to 
Com- 
mission 



$ c 
315,930.06 
3,207.58 

917.65 
7,510.64 

718.01 

20,094.36 

122,666.53 

518.38 

6,925.16 

253,939.18 



1,025.8 

178.5 

96.8 

77.4 

894.4 

351.5 
595.1 

224.2 
30.7 
27.3 

24.5 

245.1 

1,803.9 

4,050.9 

185.7 

248.7 
212.6 
40.4 
197.2 
897.6 

61.9 
611.0 

28.9 
143.2 

58.1 

207.0 

1,808.1 

18.5 

36.6 

205.2 

50.7 
67.8 
72.9 
66.2 
892.8 



Share of Operating 



Operating 
Main- 
tenance 

and 
Adminis- 
trative 
Expenses 



17,208.88 
2,994.53 
1,623.92 
1,919.59 

15,004.51 

5,896.79 

9,983.43 

3,761.19 

515.03 

457.98 

411.01 

4,111.81 

30,262.33 

67,958.13 

3,115.31 

4,172.21 

, 3,566.59 

677.75 

3,308.24 
15,058.19 

1,038.44 
10,250.17 

484.83 
2,402.33 

974.69 

3,472.64 

30,332.79 

310.36 

614.00 

3,442.45 

850.55 

1,137.42 

1,222.97 

1,110.58 

14,977.66 



S c 

36,820.71 

2,676.82 

831.05 
2,486.67 

575.95 

7,291.28 

28,416.88 

689.83 

3,418.69 
46,602.54 



15,914.89 

1,566.66 

963.34 

163.80 

4,896.10 

2,811.16 

2,558.77 

1,883.02 

981.71 

486.71 

431.64 
2,301.17 
7,603.66 
4,228.74 

975.68 

2,485.33 
2,159.21 
639.61 
2,134.33 
3,261.13 

1,042.42 
4,266.31 
855.93 
1,457.43 
1,283.09 

2,774.10 

7,091.13 

443.40 

93.58 

2,104.03 

584.91 

1,027.93 

720.51 

575.67 

7,048.58 



1923 



HYDRO-ELECTRIC POWER COMMISSION 



205 



SYSTEM— Continued 

Section 23 of the Act — of Power Supplied to it by the Commission, the Amount 
and the Amount Remaining to be Credited or Charged to Each Municipality 
of Power Supplied to it in the Year Ending 31st October, 1922 



Costs and Fixed Charges. 


Total Cost 

of Power ] 

"or year as 

Drovided to 

be paid 

under 

Section 23 

of Act 


Amounts 

Daid to the 

Com- l 

mission 

by each 

munici 

pality 


Amounts remaining to 
be credited or charged 
to each municipality 
ipon ascertainment of 
the actual Cost of 
Power by annual 
adjustment 


SinkingFund 
for the years 
mentioned 
hereunder 
charged as 
part of the 
Cost of Power 


Renewals 


Contin- 
gencies 


Sinking 
Fund 




Credited 


Charged 


in the year 
1921-1922 


$ c. 
8,428.00 


$ c. 

18,832.20 

191.20 

54.70 
447.70 

42.80 

1,197.80 

7,312.00 

30.90 

412.80 

15,137.00 

1,025.80 

178.50 

96.80 

77.40 

894.40 

351.50 

595.10 

224.20 

30.70 

27.30 

24.50 

245.10 

1,803.90 

4,050.90 

185.70 

248.70 
212.60 
40.40 
197.20 
897.60 

61.90 
611.00 

28.90 
143.20 

58.10 

207.00 

1,808.10 

18.50 

36.60 

205.20 

50.7C 

67.8C 

► 72.9C 

66.2C 

892. 8C 


$ c. 
12,136.32 
740.56 
810.46 
563.64 
226.10 

1,568.85 

7,704.05 

144.45 

834.97 

15,015.76 

2,456.76 
460.53 
445.54 

' i, 383.33 

488.46 
531.99 
557.64 

" 227. i6 

578.14 

4,420.29 
378.19 

658.59 

60.47 

678.88 
774.88 

' 1,536.71 

411.98 
198.31 

728.98 

i,856.07 

147.02 



720. i A 

224.65 


233.24 



1,726.0 C 


$ c. 

425,948.29 

9,682.36 

3,937.45 

12,876.13 

2,313.93 

35,339.69 

191,886.87 

1,984.87 

15,608.62 
381,150.34 

43,928.07 
6,787.29 
4,451.89 
3,232.88 

27,333.64 

12,328.31 

16,638.26 

8,225.63 

2,307.41 

1,730.37 

1,377.41 

9,104.76 

52,757.94 

78,845.26 

4,729.06 

9,603.27 
7,863.58 
1,974.11 
8,539.65 
23,291.65 

4,043.08 
21,416.72 
2,647.33 
5,334.88 
3,367.42 

9,499.88 

47,311.04 

1,435.78 

789.48 

8,605.21 

2,500.81 
3,049.62 
2,581.14 
2,291.5( 
> 30.259.1J 


$ c. 

372,310.10 

9,738.10 

3,425.88 

12,816.83 

2,356.61 

35,594.11 

179,509.95 

2,991.85 

15,272.68 
366,059.43 

35,661.90 
6,683.08 
4,840.28 
5,521.82 

28,039.06 

12,303.48 

14,982.41 

8,258.79 

2,146.12 

1,934.45 

1,645.60 

9,076.29 

45,925.60 

67,395.34 

4,883.47 

9,498.77 

10,043.76 

2,012.60 

8,875.12 

22,677.07 

4,639.99 

21,997.20 

• 2,114.95 

4,362.28 

3,600.62 

10,349.14 
47,465.11 

1,693.5C 
673.82 

9,232.7<: 

3,026.77 

3,437.75 

t 3,153.2/ 

) 2,558.48 

\\ 30,775.28 


$ c. 


$ c. 
53,638.19 


1921-22 


624.83 


55.74 


1916-17 


290.17 


511.57 
59.30 


1916-17 


391.41 




1921-22 


164.09 


42.68 
254.42 


1916-17 


1,089.48 




1921-22 


5,350.03 


12,376.92 


1921-22 


131.53 


1,006.98 


1917-18 


868.67 


335.94 
15,090.91 

8,266.17 
104.21 


1916-17 


10,427.58 




1921-22 


1,570.03 




1918-19 


342.45 




1917-18 


287.84 


388.39 

2,288.94 

705.42 


1917-18 


237.19 






1,097.11 




1919-20 


598.06 


24.83 
1,655.85 


1916-17 


627.95 

387.25 


33.i6 


1920-21 
1921-22 


171.07 


161.29 




116.21 


204.08 
268.19 


1917-18 


111.70 






401.49 


28.47 

6,832.34 

11,449.92 


1921-22 


1,830.03 




1918-19 


493.21 
100.08 


" " 154.41 


1917-18 


438.90 


104.50 


1920-21 


415.60 


2,180.18 

38.49 

335.47 




121.02 




1916-17 


481.79 




1916-17 


686.46 


614.58 


1918-19 


417.42 


596.91 

580.48 




1,021.77 




1916-17 


190.12 


532.38 
972.6C 


1918-19 


243.84 




1920-21 


229.82 


233.2C 

849.2<: 
154.07 

257.72 




502.59 





1920-21 


1,288.94 
113.37 




1921-22 
1918-19 


10.02 


115.6( 




462.02 


627.5! 

525.9( 
388.r 

572.1: 

263.9: 
516.K 


1917-18 


172.32 




1919-20 


177.34 


1 




69.8C 


5 


1917-18 


116.72 


> 




1,198.6/ 


) 




J 1921-22 



206 



FIFTEENTH ANNUAL REPORT OF THE 



No. 49 



NIAGARA 

Statement Showing the Amount to be Paid by Each Municipality as the Cost — under 

Received by the Commission from Each Municipality on Account of such Cost, 

upon Ascertainment (by Annual Adjustment) of the Actual Cost 





Interim Rates per 
Horsepower col- 
lected by 
Commission 

H 11 n n O" woof 


Share of 
Capital Cost 
of system on 


Horse- 
power 




Share of Operating 




Operating 






which 


supplied in 


Cost of 


Main- 




Municipality 


UUl 111^ 


> y~"- 


interest and 
fixed 


year after 
correction 


Power to 
Com- 


tenance 
and 










Interest 




To 


To 


charges are 


for power 


mission 


Adminis- 






Dec. 31, 


Oct. 31, 


payable 


factor 




trative 






1921 


1922 








Expenses 






$ c. 


$ c. 


$ c. 




$ c. 


$ c. 


$ c. 


St. Thomas. . . 


25.00 


30.00 


239,026.38 


2,742.8 


46,013.37 


15,095.35 


9,650.06 


Sarnia 


35.00 


35.00 


501,993.95 


3,297.9 


55,325.76 


22,457.89 


19,941.89 


Scarboro Twp. 


28.00 


35.00 


17,598.46 


295.3 


7,323.71 


685.03 


774.32 


Seaforth 


36.00 


40.00 


63,449.95 


• 339.7 


5,698.83 


2,967.06 


2,684.44 


Simcoe 


28.00 


34.00 


38,816.64 


348.4 


5,844.78 


2,228.33 


1,600.14 


Springfield. . . . 


65.00 


65.00 


8,999.2-5 


18.6 


312.03 


594.71 


390.10 


Stamford Twp. 


16.00 


20.00 


9,747.62 


473.3 


7,940.11 


829.37 


429.87 


Stratford 


27.00 


30.00 


289,592.57 


2,955.9 


49,588.35 


16,483.89 


11,807.97 


Strath roy 


37.00 


40.00 


84,136.77 


453.7 


7,611.30 


3,280.19 


3,477.49 


Streetsville . . . 


12.00+ 
kw-hr 


12.00+ 
kw-hr 


42,821.69 


272.9 


4,578.18 


2,640.17 


1,726.22 


Tavistock. . . . 


35.00 


37.00 


47,760.33 


275.3 


4,618.45 


2,184.43 


2,014.46 


Thamesford . . . 


50.00 


54.00 


22,315.14 


99.6 


1,670.90 


1,119.53 


931.58 


Thamesville . . 


55.00 


55.00 


16,984.29 


79.1 


1,326.97 


1,045.47 


701.81 


Thedford 




110.77 


20,144.17 


15.2 


255.00 


623.48 


493.68 


Thorndale .... 


60.66 


70.00 


15,940.62 


47.8 


801.90 


991.01 


682.85 


Tilbury 


50.00 


50.00 


33,916.41 


186.6 


3,130.41 


1,665.62 


1,370.58 


Tillsonburg. . . 


30.00 


39.00 


61,993.86 


364.3 


6,111.52 


3,876.02 


2,612.58 


Toronto 


17.00 


22.00 


4,519,247.27 


73,676.9 


1,236,007.88 


117,443.16 


167,855.19 


Toronto Twp.. 


25.00 


30.00 


25,426.17 


288.8 


4,844.93 


1,724.29 


1,011.55 


Walkerville . . . 


35.00 


35.00 


625,776.06 


4,401.9 


73,846.53 


24,308.41 


25,265.78 


Wallaceburg. . 


35.00 


35.00 


124,703.74 


787.1 


13,204.44 


4,895.26 


4,901.60 


Wardsville. . . . 


82.20 


82.20 


6,832.59 


11.3 


189.57 


398.92 


294.15 


Waterdown . . . 


31.00 


36.00 


18,960.08 


137.5 


2,306.71 


1,041.23 


790.75 


Waterford. . . . 


33.00 


38.00 


21,067.73 


171.2 


2,872.06 


1,198.11 


873.53 


Waterloo 


21.00 


26.00 


107,984.45 


1,468.0 


24,627.25 


6,439.33 


4,287.35 


Watford 


85.00 


85.00 


31,616.87 


68.1 


1,142.45 


1,699.24 


1,298.73 


Welland 


16.00 


20.00 


89,950.29 


1,711.5 


28,712.22 


2,964.79 


3,945.29 


Wellesley 


39.00 


43.00 


29,715.82 


132.4 


2,221.15 


1,423.51 


1,264.89 


West Lome . . . 


50.00 


45.00 


32,393.34 


176.5 


2,960.97 


2,099.13 


1,259.02 


Weston ...... 


23.00 


29.00 


112,203.64 


1,195.4 


20,054.10 


5,796.81 


4,493.18 


Windsor 


35.00 


35.00 


1,011,472.81 


7,166.3 


120,222.16 


38,264.31 


40,811.89 


Woodbridge . . 


31.00 


37.00 


28,171.72 


180.6 


3,029.76 


1,514.63 


1,172.52 


Woodstock. . . 


21.00 


27.00 


139,769.50 


2,142.5 


35,942.70 


9,474.44 


5,472.77 


Wyoming 


60.00 


60.00 


12,729.42 


38.7 


649.23 


712.43 


534.92 


Zurich 


60.00 


74.00 


26,682.21 


51.2 


858.94 


1,071.75 


1,146.40 



1923 



HYDRO-ELECTRIC POWER COMMISSION 



207 



SYSTEM— Continued 

Section 23 of the Act — of Power Supplied to it by the Commission, the Amount 
and the Amount Remaining to be Credited or Charged to Each Municipality 
of Power Supplied to it in the Year Ending 31st October, 1922 



Costs and Fixed Charges 


Total Cost 

of Power 

for year as 

provided to 

be paid 

under 
Section 23 

of Act 


Amounts 
paid to the 
Com- 
mission 
by each 
munici- 
pality 


Amounts remaining to 

be credited or charged 

to each municipality 

upon ascertainment of 

the actual Cost of 

Power by annual 

adjustment 


SinkingFund 

for the years 

mentioned 

hereunder 

charged as 

part of the 

Cost 

of Power 


Renewals 


Contin- 
gencies 


Sinking 
Fund 




Credited 


Charged 


in the year 
1921-1922 


$ c. 
2,570.43 


$ c. 
2,742.80 
3,297.90 
295.30 
339.70 
348.40 

18.60 

473.30 

2,955.90 

453.70 

272.90 

275.30 
99.60 
79.10 
15.20 
47.80 

186.60 

364.30 

73,676.90 

288.80 

4,401.90 

787.10 

11.30 

137.50 

171.20 

1,468.00 

68.10 

1,711.50 

132.40 

176.50 

1,195.40 

7,166.30 
180.60 

2,142.50 
38.70 
51.20 


$ c. 
3,701.42 
5,786.99 


$ c. 

79,773.43 

112,270.05 

9,298.34 

.13,499.14 

10,760.53 

1,425.10 

9,859.18 

88,571.32 

17,044.75 

10,372.52 

10,077.82 
4,464.04 
3,640.69 
1,526.66 
3,035.75 

7,225.13 

14,719.97 

1,700,125.11 

8,427.24 

143,542.46 

27,188.33 

976.80 

4,803.40 

5,775.44 

39,620.44 

4,573.23 

38,454.62 

5,792.86 

7,003.85 

34,472.17 

226,395.54 

6,627.46 

56,499.99 

2,406.63 

3,450.78 


$ c. 

80,555.44 

115,426.46 

9,983.85 

13,302.15 

11,495.35 

1,617.38 

9,619.97 

87,261.80 

17,400.22 

10,817.88 

10,083.97 
5,326.68 
1,351.37 
1,679.07 
3,228.05 

9,331.86 

13,618.10 

1,557,278.85 

8,445.53 

156,358.66 

27,547.30 

930.21 

4,853.67 

6,350.21 

37,445.94 

5,785.64 

33,322.26 

5,598.98 

8,085.76 

33,677.23 

251,253.35 

6,483.88 

55,768.92 

2,321.00 

3,652.75 


$ c. 

782.01 

3,156.41 

685.51 


$ c. 


1921-22 


5,459.62 




1916-17 


219.98 






741.44 


1,067.67 
306.03 


196.99 


1921-22 


432.85 


734.82 
192.28 


1917-18 


109.66 






122.12 


64.41 

4,565.04 

1,262.45 

681.66 

430.06 
383.99 
292.90 


239.21 
1,309.52 


1916-17 


3,170.17 




1921-22 


959.62 


355.47 
445.36 

6.15 
862.64 
710.68 
152.41 
192.30 

2,106.73 


1918-19 


473.39 




1921-22 


555.12 




1916-1.7 


258.44 




1918-19 


194.44 




1917-18 


139.30 






191.00 


321.19 

494.19 

1,036.06 

62.051.00 

288.31 
8,816.56 

2,056.52 




1918-19 


377.73 




1917-18 


719.49 


1,101.87 
142,846.26 


1921-22 


43,090.98 




1921-22 


269.36 


18.29 
12,816.20 

358.97 


1919-20 


6,903.28 




1918-19 


1,343.41 




1917-18 


82.86 


46.59 




216.07 


311.14 

423.05 

1,622.07 


50.27 
574.77 


1921-22 


237.49 




1917-18 


1,126.44 


2,174.50 


1921-22 


364.71 


1,212.41 




1,120.82 




5,132.35 
193.88 




351.09 


399.82 

161.56 

1,730.76 

8,783.54 
408.11 

2,046.44 
321.80 




1916-17 


346.67 


1,081.91 


1916-17 


1,201.92 


794.94 


1921-22 


11,147.34 


24,857.81 


1918-19 


321.84 
1,421.14 


143.58 
731.07 
85.63 


1918-19 
1921-22 


149.55 




1916-17 


322.49 


201.97 













208 



FIFTEENTH ANNUAL REPORT OF THE 



No. 49 



NIAGARA 

Statement Showing the Amount to be Paid by Each Municipality as the Cost — under 

Received by the Commission from Each Municipality on Account of such Cost, 

upon Ascertainment (by Annual Adjustment) of the Actual Cost 





Share of 
Capital Cost 
)f system on 

which 
interest and 

fixed 

charges are 

payable 


Horse- 
power 
supplied in 
year after 
correction 
for power 
factor 


Cost of 
Power to 
Com- 
mission 


Share of Operating 


( 
Municipality 


Operating 
Main- 
tenance 

and 
Adminis- 
trative 
Expenses 


Interest 


Aylmer rural power district . . . 
Baden rural power district .... 

Brant rural power district 

Chatham rural power district. . 
Dorchester rural power district 

Drumbo rural power district.. . 
Dundas rural power district. . . 

Gait rural power district 

Ingersoll rural power district. . 


$ c. 

6,218.61 
10,629.67 

8,914.26 
23,592.83 
45,424.51 

9,787.62 

16,168.88 

1,963.50 

495.90 

2,103.45 

8,449.72 

8,102.12 

37,952.16 

27,938.48 

100,321.46 

4,421.54 

10,164.85 

3,533.32 

1,536.69 


6.7 
19.9 

3.2 
26.0 
42.1 

3.2 
5.4 

.5 


$ c. 
112.40 
333.84 
53.68 
436.18 
706.27 

53.69 

90.59 

8.39 


% c. 
316.27 
870.20 
64.46 
503.90 
1,604.80 

62.57 

523.17 

1.99 

14.52 

29.36 

140.35 
300.48 

1,730.34 
410.52 

4,188.49 

77.36 
296.29 
118.48 
448.16 

98.53 
225.35 
412.43 
196.92 

54.98 


$ c. 
269.03 
460.28 
179.15 
560.51 
1,006.44 

154.15 

569.03 

12.07 

21.82 


Jordan rural power district. . . . 

Lynden rural power district. . . 
Niagara rural power district. . . 
Preston rural power district . . . 
Ridgetown rural power district 
Saltfleet rural power district. . . 

Sandwich rural power district.. 
Stamford rural power district . . 
Welland rural power district.. . 
Woodstock rural power district 


1.8 

6.6 
15.0 
99.5 
14.1 
69.1 

5.8 

10.2 

3.6 


41.47 

110.72 
25i.64 

1,669.22 
236.54 

1,159.23 

97.30 

171.12 

60.40 


41.78 

269.97 
282.80 

1,589.10 
403.53 

2,232.52 

69.01 

290.99 

88.62 

67.61 


Municipalities supplied directly 
from Ontario Power Co. 

Merritton 


217.3 

473.4 

4,222.1 

81.0 

3.2 

257.8 

39.0 

162.9 


Cost of power 

at points of 

delivery to 

Commission 

4,468.31 

11,234.21 

83,563.79 

1,955.46 

74.04 

5.156.0C 

948.19 

3,960.53 




Port Colborne 






St. Catharines 


19,383.54 


1,036.78 


Chippawa Village 


26.83 


Chippawa Rural Power District 
Welland (Pt. Robinson) 


17,378.88 

31,309.14 

28,289.47 

5,834.33 


253.35 
1,565.32 


Grantham Township 


51.25 
284.42 


1,414.46 


Port Dalhousie 


233.37 






Totals — Municipalities 

Totals — Companies 


16,543,465.04 
2,621,743.63 


195.668. C 
32,239. t 


3,305,358. It 
543,139.34 


665,019.93 
100,755.30 


617,923.93 
108,183.68 


Grand Totals 


19,165,208.6/ 

2,010,551.9S 
235,678.9/ 


227,907. £ 
> 


3,848,497.6C 


765,775.23 


726,107.61 


Non-Operating Capital 

" " R.P.D. 






21,411,439.6- 





1923 



HYDRO-ELECTRIC POWER COMMISSION 



209 



SYSTEM— Continued 

Section 23 of the Act — of Power Supplied to it by the Commission, the Amount 
and the Amount Remaining to be Credited or Charged to Each Municipality 
of Power Supplied to it in the Year Ending 31st October, 1922 



Costs and Fixed Charges. 


Total Cost 

of Power 

for year as 

provided to 

be paid 

under 

Section 23 

of Act 


Amounts 
paid to the 
Com- 
mission 
by each 
munici- 
pality 


Amounts remaining to 

be credited or charged 

to each municipality 

upon ascertainment of 

the actual Cost of 

Power by annual 

adjustment 


Sinking Fund 
for the years 
mentioned 
hereunder 
charged as 
part of the 
Cost of Power 


Renewals 


Contin- 
gencies 


Sinking 
Fund 




Credited 


Charged 


in the year 
1921-1922 


$ c. 
132.23 


$ c. 

6.70 
19.90 

3.20 
26.00 
42.10 

3.20 

5.40 

.50 


$ c. 
109.45 
186.51 
73.00 
226.97 
407.94 

62.77 

232..30 

4.89 

8.92 

17.09 

109.85 
115.69 
641.15 
163.82 
907.09 

27.72 

119.04 

36.25 

27.66 

64.99 

446.63 

1,367.02 

64.22 

104.31 

563.51 
509.22 
105.02 


$ c. 

946.08 
2,147.06 

504.54 
2,111.42 
4,338.54 

421.54 

1,874,38 

34.45 

61.60 

154.76 

747.77 

1,173.33 

6,671.48 

1,461.29 

10,014.50 

312.62 

1,063.79 

352.64 

602.42 

4,631.83 
11,906.19 
86,380.02 

2,244.73 
674.36 

7,284.83 
2,962.12 
4,819.17 


$ c. 

369.07 
1,758.54 

970.89 
2,984.52 
7,887.50 

564.84 

2,771.97 

91.16 

73.60 

308.31 

1,036.33 
1,763.61 

11,434.79 
3,610.68 

13,517.96 

804.39 

1,627.90 

537.59 

594.10 

3,910.95 

11,502.06 

75,659.08 

2,591.44 

1,139.09 

6,524,79 
2,637.32 
4,104.98 


$ c. 


$ c. 
577.01 
388.52 


1921—22 


276.33 




1921-22 


131.05 


466.35 

873.10 

3,548.96 

143.30 

897.59 

56.71 

12.00 

153.55 

288.56 

590.28 

4,763.31 

2,149.39 

3,503.46 

491.77 
564.11 
184.95 


1921-22 


357.86 




1921-22 


570.99 




1921-22 


85.16 




1921-22 


453.89 




1921-2? 


6.61 
16.34 




1921-22 
1921-22 


23.26 


1.80 

6.60 
15.00 
99.50 
14.10 
69.10 

5.80 

10.20 

3.60 




1921-22 


110.28 
207.72 




1921-22 
1921-22 


942.17 




1921-22 


232.78 




1921-22 


1,458.07 




1921-22 


35.43 




1921-22 


176.15 




1921-22 


45.29 




1921-22 


58.99 


8.32 

720.88 

404.13 

10,720.94 


1921-22 


























1.30 




346.71 
464.73 




184.48 


3.20 








760.04 
324.80 
714.19 






39.00 
162.90 






72.93 










166,006.69 
29,248.83 


190,416.40 
31,275.20 


211,587.56 
42,555.81 


5,156,312.77 
855,158.16 


4,959,172.76 
698,569.58 


110,117.72 
4,862.29 


307,257.73 
161,450.87 




195,255.52 


221,691.60 


254,143.37 


6,011,470.93 


5,657,742.34 


114,980.01 


468,708.60 





210 FIFTEENTH ANNUAL REPORT OF THE No. 49 



NIAGARA SYSTEM 

Reserve for Contingencies Account, 31st October, 1922 

Balance brought forward 31st October, 1921 $24,875.01 

Added during the year ending 31st October, 1922: 

Amounts charged to Municipalities as part of the Cost of Power 

delivered to them $190,416.40 

Provision against equipment employed in respect of contracts with 

Sundry Customers 31,275.20 

Interest at 4% per annum on monthly balances at the credit of 

the account 995.00 

222,686.60 

$247,561.61 
Deduct: 

Expenditures to cover contingencies met with during the year 

ending 31st October, 1921 $86,119.16 

Net loss for year on power sold to Sundry Power Customers 156,588.58 

242,707.74 

Balance carried forward 31st October, 1922 $4,853.87 









923 HYDRO-ELECTRIC POWER COMMISSION 211 



NIAGARA SYSTEM 

Reserve for Renewals Account, 31st October, 1922 

Total provision for Renewals to 31st October, 1921 $2,389,794.33 

" provision for Renewals to 31st October, 1921 — Rural Lines. . . 7,036.07 

$2,396,830.40 
Deduct: 

Expenditures to 31st October, 1921 $167,428.43 

Expenditures to 31st October, 1921— Rural 679.70 

Reduction of Renewals Reserve upon adjustment of Dunnville 

Capital 897.58 

— 169,005.71 

$2,227,824.69 
Added during the year ending 31st Octobar, 1921: 

Amount charged to Municipalities as part of the Cost of Power 

delivered to them $166,006.69 

Provision against equipment employed in respect of contracts with 

Sundry Companies • 29,248.83 

Interest at 4% per annum on the monthly balances to the credit 

of the account 89,112.99 

Renewals Reserve provided on second-hand equipment pur- 
chased 4.70 

284,373.21 

$2,512,197.90 
Expenditures during the year ending 31st October, 1922 36,776.88 

Balance carried forward 31st October, 1922 $2,475,421.02 



212 



FIFTEENTH ANNUAL REPORT OF THE 



No. 49 



NIAGARA 

Statement Showing the Total Sinking Fund Requirements to be Met by each Muni 
the Commission under Section 23 of the Act. — Sinking Fund Payments made 

the total of such Sinking Fund Payments, including 



Municipality 



Total Sinking Fund requirements 

chargeable to the municipality 

under the Act 



(a) For period of 



(b) Amount 



Sinking Fund requirements the 
payment of which has been 
deferred 



(a) For period of 



(b) Amount 



Acton 

Ailsa Craig, 
Alvinston. . 
Aylmer. . . 
Ayr , 



Baden 
Beachville. 
Blenheim. . 

Bolton 

Bothwell. . 



Brampton. . . 
Brantford . . . 

Brigden 

Burford 

Burgessville. 

Caledonia. . . 

Chatham 

Chippawa V. 

Clinton 

Comber 



Dashwood. . 
Delaware. . . 
Dereham T. 
Dorchester . 
Drayton . . . 



Dresden . . . 
Drumbo. . 
Dublin.... 
Dundas. . . 
Dunnville. 



Dutton 

Elmira. ...... 

Elora 

Embro 

Etobicoke T. 

Exeter 

Fergus 

Forest 

Gait 

Georgetown. 



Glencoe. . . , 
Goderich. . . 
Granton . . . 
Guelph 
Hagersville , 



6 years ending 31 Oct. 1922 



" • « 192 2 

" " 1922 

(See end of this table) 

" " 1922 
" " 1922 



1922 

" 1922 

" 1922 

" 1922 

" 1922 

" 1922 

" 1922 

" 1922 

" 1922 



" 1922 

" 1922 

" 1922 

" 1922 

" 1922 



" 1922 
" 1922 
" 1922 
" 1922 
1922 



tt 


1922 


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1922 


tt 


1922 


tt 


1922 


tt 


1922 


a 


1922 


tt 


1922 


tt 


1922 


tt 


1922 


u 


1922 


tt 


1922 


it 


1922 


tt 


1922 


tt 


1922 


u 


1922 


tt 


1922 


a 


1922 


a 


1922 


tt 


1922 


tt 


1922 



$ c. 
2,840.60 
3,185.18 

400.12 
4,286.87 
1,497.05 

2,885.35 
3,009.17 
4,030.35 
4,192.61 
4,063.85 

7,155.28 

22,667.59 

2,624.43 

1,870.85 

657.89 

707.75 
23,230.65 



4,234.63 
2,566.50 

2,082.83 
457.53 
569.08 
478.54 

2,339.11 

2,887.43 

561.75 

946.29 

5,341.63 

7,218.29 

1,986.41 
4,209.17 
4,125.55 
1,950.78 
2,101.48 

6,593.47 
3,470.60 
4,844.97 
21,826.39 
8,981.98 

1,445.12 
14,384.20 

1,380.50 
20,343.28 

4.185.43 



1 years ending 31 Oct. 1922 
a « « 1922 

tt « tt JQ22 

5 " " " 1922 

3 " " " 1922 



" 1922 

" 1922 

" 1922 

" 1922 

" 1922 



3 years ending 31 Oct. 
5 " " " 

4 « tt tt 

5 " " " 



1922 
1922 
1922 
1922 

1922 
1922 



3 " 

4 " 

6 " 

4 " 

4 " 

3 " 

5 " 

4 " 
3 " 

6 « 



" 1922 

" 1922 

" 1922 

" 1922 

" 1922 

" 1922 

" 1922 

" 1922 

" 1922 

" 1922 



5 years ending 31 Oct. 1922 



" 1922 

" 1922 

" 1922 

" 1922 

" 1922 



" 1922 
" 1922 
" 1922 



2 years ending 31 Oct. 1922 



3 " " 

3 " " 

5 " " 



" 1922 
" 1922 
" 1922 



2 years ending 31 Oct. 1922 



S c. 

588.57 
2,382.56 

400.12 
4,286.87 

819.64 

458.12 

506.77 

2,717.70 

2,782.67 

2,788.60 



13,722.80 

2,624.43 

1,303.17 

593.11 

132.57 
16,595.94 



2,319.40 
1,894.16 

2,082.83 
314.47 
569.08 
250.50 

2,339.11 

2,104.87 
250.40 
946.29 



7,218.29 

1,388.31 
1,744.12 
2,071.15 
.982.38 
2,101.48 

4,045.98 
1,874.90 
4.844.97 



3,480.60 

1,445.12 
7,767.41 
1,188.81 



1,832.99 



1923 



HYDRO-ELECTRIC POWER COMMISSION 



213 



SYSTEM 

cipality, Sinking Fund Requirements, the Payment of which has been Deferred by 
by Certain Municipalities which have been Operating more than Five Years, and 
Interest allowed thereon, to 31st October, 1922 



Sinking Fund requirements paid 
(or charged) as part of the cost of power 


Interest at 4% 

per annum 

allowed on 

Sinking Fund 

requirements 

which have 

been paid 


i 

Sinking Fund 

paid by each 

municipality as 

part of the cost of 

power supplied by 

Ontario Power Co. 


Total Sinking 

Fund payments 

and accumulated 

interest to the 

credit of the 


(a) For period of 


(b) Amount 


municipality on 
31st October,1922 


5 vears ending 31 Oct. 1921 
2 « « « 1918 


$ c. 

2,252.03 

802.62 


$ c. 

177.77 

12.90 


$ c. 
613.74 
353.44 
26.58 
517.59 
205.18 

554.82 
755.49 
437.34 
323.52 
384.29 

2,678.26 

12,623.89 

203.42 

130.06 

72.59 

245.24 
6,536.88 
176.51 
487.28 
269.40 

138.31 
34.01 

175.47 
70.36 

146.63 

519.95 

67.70 

79.15 

3,414.66 

749.44 

307.11 
898.15 
619.39 
134.13 
1,106.42 

522.39 

534.83 

347.98 

8,508.20 

1,515.35 

155.21 

1,287.00 

126.99 

11,238.67 

976.71 


$ c. 
3,043.54 
1,168.96 

26.58 








517.59 


3 years ending 31 Oct. 1919 

5 " " " 1921 

5 " " " 1921 
2 " « " 1918 
2 " " " 1918 

2 " " " 1918 

6 " " " 1922 

3 " " " 1919 


677.41 

2,427.23 
• 2,502.40 
1,312.65 
1,409.94 
1,275.25 

7,155.28 
8,944.79 


26.42 

249.06 

192.50 

27.11 

28.46 

25.15 

716.42 
338.23 


909.01 

3,231.11 
3,450.39 
1,777.10 
1,761.92 
1,684.69 

10,549.96 

21,906.91 

203.42 


2 years ending 31 Oct. 1918 
1 " " " 1917 


567.68 
64.78 

575.18 
6,634.71 


11.35 


709.09 

137.37 


5 " " " 1921 
2 " " " 1918 


45.65 
120.89 


866.07 

13,292.48 

176.51 


3 years ending 31 Oct. 1919 
2 " " " 1918 


1,915.23 
672.34 




2,475.36 
956.46 

138.31 


14.72 


2 years ending 31 Oct. 1918 


143.06 


2.93 


180.00 

175.47 






8.74 


'307.14 
146.63 


2 years ending 31 Oct. 1918 

3 " " " 1919 


782.56 
311.35 


14.67 
14.67 


1,317.18 

393.45 

79.15 


6 years ending 31 Oct. 1922 


5,341.63 


603.59 


9,359.88 
749.44 


2 years ending 31 Oct. 1918 
4 " " " 1920 

3 " " " 1919 
3 " " " 1919 


598.10 
2,465.05 
2,054.40 

968.40 


11.52 

147.83 
77.36 
40.46 


916.73 
3,511.03 
2,751.15 
1,142.99 
1,106.42 


1 year ending 31 Oct. 1917 
3 " " " 1919 


2,547.49 
1,595.70 




3,069.88 


6452 


2,195.05 
347.98 


6 years ending 31 Oct. 1922 
4 " " " 1920 


21,826.39 
5,501.38 


2,191.36 

324.26 


32,525.95 
7,340.99 

155.21 


3 years ending 31 Oct. 1919 
1 " " " 1917 


6,616.79 

191.69 

20,343.28 

2,352.44 


240.17 


8,143.96 
318.68 


6 " " " 1922 
4 " " " 1920 


2,004.26 
131.39 


33,586.21 
3,460.54 



214 



FIFTEENTH ANNUAL REPORT OF THE 



No. 49 



NIAGARA 

Statement showing the Total Sinking Fund Requirements to be Met by each Muni 
the Commission under Section 23 of the Act. — Sinking Fund Payments made 

the total of such Sinking Fund Payments, including 



Municipality 



Total Sinking Fund requirements 

chargeable to the municipality 

under the Act 



(a) For period of 



(b) Amount 



Sinking Fund requirements the 

payment of which has been 

deferred 



(a) For period of 



(b)Amount 



Hamilton .... 
Harriston .... 

Hensall 

Hespeler 

Highgate 

Ingersoll 

Kitchener. . . . 

Lambeth 

Listowel 

London 

London Ry. C. 

Lucan 

Lynden 

Markham. . . . 
Milton 

Milverton 

Mimico 

Mitchell 

Moorefield. . . 
Mt. Brydges.. 

Newbury 

New Hamburg 
New Toronto . 
Niagara Falls. 
Niagara-on-L. 

Norwich 

Oil Springs. . . 
Otterville .... 
Palmerston . . . 
Paris 

Parkhill 

Petrolia 

Plattsville 

Port Credit . . . 
Port Dover . . . 

Port Stanley. . 

Preston 

Princeton .... 
Queenston .... 
Ridgetown . . . 

Rockwood .... 

Rodney 

St. George. . . . 
St. Jacobs .... 
St. Marys. . . . 



6 years ending 31 Oct 
6 " " 

6 " " 

6 " " 

6 " " 



Oct 


. 1922 


u 


1922 


ii 


1922 


a 


1922 


a 


1922 


a 


1922 


u 


1922 


a 


1922 


a 


1922 


a 


1922 


a 


1922 


a 


1922 


a 


1922 


a 


1922 


tt 


1922 


a 


1922 


a 


1922 


a 


1922 


a 


1922 


a 


1922 


tt 


1922 


a 


1922 


ii 


1922 


a 


1922 


ii 


1922 


ii 


1922 


ii 


1922 


ii 


1922 


ii 


1922 


ii 


1922 


a 


1922 


a 


1922 


a 


1922 


a 


1922 


it 


1922 


a 


1922 


a 


1922 


it 


1922 


a 


1922 


a 


1922 


a 


1922 


a 


1922 


a 


1922 


a 


1922 


a 


1922 



$ c 
59,995.02 
5,216.62 
3,131.50 
3,381.48 
1,816.38 

8,951.45 

38,816.54 

971.22 

7,185.57 
77,921.91 

15,259.48 

2,884.02 

2,640.65 

901.06 

7,200.60 

4,584.10 
2,685.80 
3,167.30 
1,178.51 
1,202.07 

247.89 

3,358.27 

22,328.35 

2,901.58 

481.55 

3,441.80 

2,408.77 

814.71 

3,572.30 

4,471.64 

1,452.93 

9,128.54 

2,274.59 

981.31 

330.94 

4,015.64 

9,997.58 

975.66 

21.99 

4,216.78 

1,348.19 
1,623.24 
1,429.76 
1,047.85 
8,688.93 



5 years ending 31 Oct. 
5 " " " 



1922 
1922 



5 years ending 31 Oct. 1922 



4 years ending 31 Oct. 1922 

5 " " " 1922 



3 years ending 31 Oct. 
4. a u a 

4 u it a 

3 " " « 

2 a a a 



1922 
1922 
1922 
1922 
1922 

1922 
1922 



5 years ending 31 Oct. 1922 
4 " " " 1922 



1922 



3 years ending 31 Oct. 

4 u tt a 

A tt ii ii 



1922 
1922 
1922 

1922 
1922 
1922 
1922 
1922 

1922 
1922 
1922 
1922 
1922 

1922 



3 years ending 31 Oct. 1922 
2 " " " 1922 

4 " " " 1922 



1922 
1922 
1922 
1922 



4,476.06 
2,321.04 



1,590.28 



671.27 
6,350.60 



7,503.77 
1,990.31 
1,746.14 
901.06 
2,952.53 

4,095.64 
904.24 



1,178.51 
760.25 

247.89 



12,794 87 

2,260.16 

481.55 

632.02 
2,408.77 

754.24 
2,893.42 
2,675.91 

1,452.93 

7,591.83 

903.16 

351.13 

330.94 

723.74 



463.97 

21.99 

2,766.02 

518.70 
1,623.24 

981.18 
1,047.85 






1923 



HYDRO-ELECTRIC POWER COMMISSION 



215 



SYSTEM— Continued 

cipality, Sinking Fund Requirements, the Payment of which has been Deferred "by 
by Certain Municipalities which have been Operating more than Five Years, and 
Interest allowed thereon, to 31st October, 1922 



Sinking Fund requirements paid 
(or charged) as part of the cost of power 



(a) For period of 



(b) Amount 



Interest at 4% 

per annum 

allowed on 

Sinking Fund 

requirements 

which have 

been paid 



Sinking Fund 

paid by each 

municipality as 

part of the cost of 

power supplied by 

Ontario Power Co. 



Total Sinking 

Fund payments 

and accumulated 

interest to the 

credit of the 

municipality on 

31st October, 1922 



6 years ending 31 Oct. 1922 
1 " " " 1917 

1 " " " 1917 

6 " " " 1922 

1 " " " 1917 



" 1922 

" 1922 

" 1918 

" 1917 

" 1922 

« 191 Q 

" 1918 

« 1918 



4 years ending 31 Oct. 1920 

1 year ending 31 Oct. 1917 

5 " " " 1921 

6 " " " 1922 



2 years ending 31 Oct. 1918 



6 years ending 31 Oct. 1922 
3 " " " 1919 
2 " " " 1918 



5 years ending 31 Oct. 1921 



1 year ending 31 Oct. 1917 
1 " " " 1917 
3 " " " 1919 



1 year ending 31 Oct. 1917 
3 " " " 1919 
5 " " " 1921 



5 years ending 31 Oct. 1921 

6 " " " 1922 
3 " " " 1919 



$ c. 
59,995.02 
740.56 
810.46 
3,381.48 
226.10 

8,951.45 

38,816.54 

299.95 

834.97 

77,921.91 

7,755.71 
893.71 
894.51 



4,248.07 

488.46 
1,781.56 
3,167.30 



441.82 



3,358.27 

9,533.48 

641.42 



2,809.78 



60.47 

678.88 

1,795.73 



1,536.71 

1,371.43 

630.18 



3,291.90 

9,997.58 

511.69 



2 years ending 31 Oct. 1918 
4 " " " 1920 



2 years ending 31 Oct. 1918 
6 years ending 31 Oct. 1922 



1,450.76 
829.49 



448.58 
'8,688.93 



$ c. 
5,473.46 



349.30 



915.38 

3,685.99 

6.22 



7,656.26 

317.91 
17.33 
17.33 



232.71 



123.34 
328.82 



.59 



344.47 

253.52 

10.53 



226.45 



58.48 



57.59 
42.28 



264.38 

943.82 

22.37 



29.22 
47.52 



8.61 
749.10' 



50,105.52 

565.57 

168.89 

1,135.40 

132.25 

3,067.03 

18,716.20 

76.60 

1,249.74 

37,205.93 

3,167.74 
516.07 
279.04 
145.76 

2,098.96 

881.11 

1,248.50 

572.82 

83.35 

77.47 

37.16 

667.00 

7^680.82 

10,227.45 

475.47 

695.59 
430.65 
104.97 
498.40 
2,139.32 

131.74 

1,616.40 

115.66 

334.25 

59.62 

540.12 

4,560.52 

45.95 

58.92 

534.63 

149.06 
176.52 
207.99 
200.45 
2.343.71 



115,574.00 

1,306.13 

979.35 

4,866.18 

358.35 

12,933.86 

61,218.73 

382.77 

2,084.71 

122,784.10 

11,241.36 

1,427.11 

1,191.51 

145.76 

6,579.74 

1,369.57 

3,153.40 

4,068.94 

83.35 

527.88 

37.16 

4,369.74 

17,467.82 

10;$79.40 

475.47 

3,731.82 

430.65 

165.44 

1,177.28 

3,993.53 

131.74 

3,153.11 

1,544.68 

1,006.71 

59.62 

4,096.40 

15,501.92 

580.01 

58.92 

2,014.61 

1,026.07 

176.52 

665.18 

200.45 

11.826.74 



216 



FIFTEENTH ANNUAL REPORT OF THE 



No. 49 



NIAGARA 

Statement Showing the Total Sinking Fund Requirements to be Met by each Muni 
the Commission under Section 23 of the Act. — Sinking Fund Payments made 

the total of such Sinking Fund Payments, including 



Municipality 



Total Sinking Fund requirements 

chargeable to the municipality 

under the Act 



(a) For period of 



(b) Amount 



Sinking Fund requirements the 

payment of which has been 

deferred 



(a) For period of 



(b) Amount 



St. Thomas. . . 

Sarnia , 

Scarboro T.. . 
Seaforth 
Simcoe 

Springfield.. . 
Stamford T. . 

Stratford 

Strathroy. . . 
Streetsville . . 

Tavistock . . . 
Thamesford. , 
Thamesville. 
Thedford .... 
Thorndale. .. 

Tilbury 

Tillsonburg . . 

Toronto 

Toronto Twp 
Walkerville . . 

Wallaceburg . 
Wardsville. . . 
Waterdown . . 
Waterford . . . 
Waterloo .... 

Watford 

Welland 

Wellesley .... 
West Lome. . 
Weston 

Windsor. . . . 
Woodbridge . 
Woodstock. . 
Wyoming. . . 
Zurich 

S. Dorchester 



6 years ending 31 Oct. 1922 
6 " " " 1922 

3 " " " 1922 

6 " " « 1922 

6 " " " 1922 



6 " 

2 " 

6 " 

6 " 

6 " 



6 " 

6 " 

6 " 

6 " 

6 " 



" 1922 

" 1922 

" 1922 

" 1922 

" 1922 



" 1922 

" 1922 

" 1922 

" 1922 

« 1922 



" 1922 

« 1922 

" 1922 

" 1922 

" 1922 

" 1922 

" 1922 

" 1922 

" 1922 

" 1922 

" 1922 

" 1922 

" 1922 

" 1922 

" 1922 



" 1922 

" 1922 

" 1922 

" 1922 

" 1922 



« 



1921 



* c. 

22,390.85 

44,099.51 

798.43 

8,370.89 

2,454.05 

999.29 

802.08 

21,172.19 

7,822.46 

1,861.15 

4,643.52 
2,125.82 
1,819.58 
200.59 
2,265.44 

2,965.80 

7,686.56 

287,621.18 

1,751.41 

62,822.17 

12,811.82 

155.14 

1,616.59 

1,958.63 

8,357.05 

3,478.53 
11,153.46 
2,965.95 
1,818.83 
8,106.30 

66,862.85 
2,395.75 

10,212.73 
1,473.64 
2,765.37 

48.19 



5 years ending 31 Oct. 1922 
3 " " « 1922 



4 years ending 31 Oct. 1922 



1922 
1922 



3 years ending 31 Oct. 1922 



5 years ending 31 Oct. 1922 

3 " " " 1922 

4 " " " 1922 
1 « " « 1922 

3 " " " 1922 

4 " " " 1922 



2 years ending 31 Oct. 1922 

3 " " « 1922 

4 " " " 1922 
2 " " " 1922 



4 years ending 31 Oct. 1922 



6 years ending 31 Oct. 
6 " " " 
5 " " " 
5 " " " 



1922 
1922 
1922 
1922 



3 years ending 31 Oct. 1922 
3 " " " 1922 



5 years ending 31 Oct. 1922 

6 " " " 1922 



1922 



38,312.52 
798.43 



1,863.31 

999.29 
737.67 



4,065.73 



4,213.46 

1,130.40 

1,157.41 

200.59 

914.41 

1,957.72 



788.45 
29,553.35 

9,027.52 
155.14 



1,275.12 



3,478.53 

11,153.46 

2,566.13 

1,657.27 



39,368.49 
1,341.83 



1,151.84 
2,765.37 

48.19 



1923 



HYDRO-ELECTRIC POWER COMMISSION 



217 



SYSTEM— Continued 

cipality, Sinking Fund Requirements, the Payment of which has been Deferred by 
by Certain Municipalities which have been Operating more than Five Years, and 
Interest allowed thereon, to 31st October, 1922. 



Sinking Fund requirements paid 
(or charged) as part of the cost of power 



(a) For period of 



(b) Amount 



Interest at 4% 
per annum 
allowed on 
Sinking Fund 
requirements 
which have 
been paid 



Sinking Fund 

paid by each 

municipality as 

part of the cost of 

power supplied by 

Ontario Power Co. 



Total Sinking 

Fund payments 

and accumulated 

interest to the 

credit of the 

municipality on 

31st October, 1922 



6 years ending 31 Oct. 1922 
1 " « " 1917 



$ c 

22,390.85 

5,786.99 



1922 
1918 



8,370.89 
590.74 



1 year ending 31 Oct. 1917 
6 " " " 1922 

3 " " " 1919 

3 " " " 1922 

1 year ending 31 Oct. 1917 
3 " " " 1919 

2 " " " 1918 



64.41 

21,172.19 

3,756.73 

1,861.15 

430.06 
995.42 
662.17 



3 years ending 31 Oct. 1919 



2 " 
6 " 
6 " 

4 " 

3 " 

2 " 



1918 
1922 
1922 
1920 
1919 

1918 



1,351.03 

1,008.08 

7,686.56 

287,621.18 

962.96 

33,268.82 

3,784.30 



6 years ending 31 Oct. 1922 
2 " " " 1918 
6 " " « 1922 



1,616.59 

683.51 

8,357.05 



1 year ending 31 Oct. 1917 
1 " " « 1917 

6 years ending 31 Oct. 1922 



" 1919 

" 1919 

" 1922 

" 1917 



399.82 

161.56 

8,106.30 

27,494.36 

1,053.92 

10,212.73 

321.80 



$ c. 
2,351.06 



986.79 
11.39 



2,032.89 

149.25 

71.64 



35.53 
14.77 



63.00 

20.56 

830.94 

27,440.97 

49.91 

1,551.64 

69.11 



156.93 

10.42 

811.37 



757.12 

1,184.62 

38.41 

982.05 



$ c. 
7,177.13 
8,355.77 

506.58 
1,037.32 

744.90 

80.85 
1,242.10 
6,727.98 
1,134.51 

588.34 

780.77 
268.27 
202.15 
15.60 
156.96 

420.01 

1,364.23 

180,761.15 

709.51 

10,502.80 

2,178.35 

14.50 

353.62 

410.47 

3,783.20 

189.59 

6,163.41 

357.13 

391.72 

2,932.13 

14,891.89 

484.16 

5,198.64 

111.43 

162.02 

9.02 



$ c. 

31,919.04 

14,142.76 

506.58 

10,395.00 

1,347.03 

80.85 

1,306.51 

29,933.06 

5,040.49 

2,521.13 

1,210.83 

1,299.22 

879.09 

15.60 

1,570.99 

1,448.65 

9,881.73 

495,823.30 

1,722.38 

45,323.26 

6,031.76 

14.50 

2,127.14 

1,1-04.40 

12,951.62 

189.59 

6,163.41 

756.95 

553.28 

11,795.55 

43,570.87 
1,576.49 

16,393.42 
433.23 
162.02 

9.02 



218 



FIFTEENTH ANNUAL REPORT OF THE 



No. 49 



NIAGARA 

Statement Showing the Total Sinking Fund Requirements to be Met by each Muni 
the Commission under Section 23 of the Act. — Sinking Fund Payments made 

the total of such Sinking Fund Payments, including 



Municipality 



Total Sinking Fund requirements 

chargeable to the municipality 

under the Act. 



(a) For period of 



(b) Amount 



Sinking Fund requirements the 

payment of which has been 

deferred 



(a) For period of 



(b) Amount 



Rural power 
districts 

Aylmer 

Baden 

Brant 

Chatham 
Dorchester.. . . 

Drumbo . . . . 

Dundas 

Gait 

Ingersoll 

Jordan 

Lynden 

Niagara 

Preston 

Ridgetown . . . 
Saltfleet 

Sandwich 
Stamford 

Welland 

Woodstock. . . 



6 years ending 31 Oct. 1922 

1 " " " 1922 

9 " " " 1922 

" « « 1922 

" « " 1922 

" « u 192 2 

u u a 1922 

" u u 1922 

" " " 1922 

" " " 1922 

a « a 1922 

a a u 1922 

u a « 1922 

a u a 1922 

u a u 1922 



" 1922 

" 1922 

" 1922 

" 1922 



Municipalities which are supplied with 
power directly from the Ontario Power Co. 



Merritton. . . . 
Port Colborne 
St. Catharines 
Chippawa 

Village. . . . 
Chippawa 

R.P.D 

Welland (Pt. 

Robinson) . 
Grantham 

Township. . 
Port 

Dalhousie. . 



2 years ending 3 1 Oct. 1922 
2 " " 

9 tt u 

i a tt 

i tt a 

10 " " 



1922 
1922 

1922 

1922 

1922 
1922 
1922 



$ c. 



397.11 
186.51 
148.50 
332.99 
407.94 

62.77 

383.74 

4.89 

131.97 

17.09 

109.85 
115.69 
641.15 
163.82 
907.09 

27.72 
119.04 

36.25 
482.40 



124.37 

824.34 

2,550.80 

64.22 

104.31 

4,654.36 

3,713.62 

845.21 



Totals — Municipalities 

Totals — Companies (from commence 
ment of operation.) 

Grand Totals 



1,198,652.15 
296,936.72 



1.495.588.87 



348,580.10 



348,580.10 



923 



HYDRO-ELECTRIC POWER COMMISSION 



219 



SYSTEM— Continued 

cipality, Sinking Fund Requirements, the Payment of which has been Deferred by 
by Certain Municipalities which have been Operating more than Five Years, and 
Interest allowed thereon, to 31st October, 1922. 



Sinking 
(or charged) 


?und requirements paid 

as part of the cost of power 


Interest at 4% 
per annum 
allowed on 
Sinking Fund 
requirements 
which have 
been paid 


Sinking Fund 

paid by each 

municipality as 

part of the cost of 

power supplied by 

Ontario Power Co. 


Total Sinking 

Fund payments 

and accumulated 

interest to the 

credit of the 


(a) For 


period o 


f 


(b) Amount 


municipality on 
31st October, 1922 


6 years e 
1 " 


ndir 
tt 

tt 

tt 

tt 

« 
a 
tt 
u 
u 

tt 
tt 
u 
u 

tt 

a 

u 
u 
u 

tt 
u 

u 

tt 
tt 

tt 
a 

u 


g31 Oct 

tt 

« 

tt 

u 

u 
tt 

tt 
tt 

it 
a 
tt 

a 
tt 

tt 
tt 

it 
it 

a 
n 
tt 

tt 

tt 

u 
a 
tt 


. 1922 
1922 
1922 
1922 
1922 

1922 
1922 
1922 
1922 
1922 

1922 
1922 
1922 
1922 
1922 

1922 
1922 
1922 
1922 

1922 
1922 
1022 

1922 

1922 

1922 
1922 
1922 


$ c. 

397.11 
186.51 
148.50 
332.99 
407.94 

62.77 

383.74 

4.89 

131.97 

17.09 

109.85 
115.69 
641.15 
163.82 
907.09 

27.72 
119.04 

36.25 
482.40 

124.37 

824.34 

2,550.80 

64.22 

104.31 

4,654.36 

3,713.62 

845.21 


$ c. 
26.74 


$ c. 

6.87 
20.42 

3.29 
26.68 
43.20 

3.28 

5.54 

.51 


$ c. 

430.72 
206.93 


9 " 
7 " 
1 " 


12.56 
13.70 


164.35 
373.37 
451.14 


i u 




66 05 


2 " 
1 " 


6.05 


395.33 
5 40 


9 " 


22.45 


154 42 


1 " 


1.85 

6.77 

15.39 

102.10 

14.47 

70.90 

5.95 

10.47 

3.69 


18 94 


1 " 




116.62 


1 a 




131.08 


1 " 




743.25 


1 " 




178.29 


1 " 




977.99 


1 " 




33.67 


1 " 




129.51 


1 " 




39.94 


10 " 


83.85 

2.37 

15.11 

199.34 


566 25 


2 " 




126.74 


2 " 




839.45 


9 " 




2,750.14 
240.73 


1 " 


176.51 

3.28 


1 " 




107.59 


10 " 


722.28 
507.95 
127.51 


5,376.64 

4,221.57 

972.72 


8 " 




8 " 


















850,072.05 
296,936.72 


71,533.83 
44,299.11 


477,548.92 


1,399,154.80 
341,235.83 










1,147,008.77 


115,832.94 


477,548.92 


1,740,390.63 



220 



FIFTEENTH ANNUAL REPORT OF THE 



No. 49 



NIAGARA 

Statement Showing the Net Credit or Charge to Each Municipality in respect of 

thereon, Adjustments Made and Interest added during the Year; also the Net 

in the Year Ending 31st October, 1922, and the Accumulated Amount 



Municipality 



Date 
commenced 
operating 



Net Credit or Charge at 
31st October, 1921 



Credit 



Charge 



Acton 

Ailsa Craig 
Alvinston . . 

Aylmer 

Ayr 



Baden. . . . 
Beachville 
Blenheim . 

Bolton 

Bothwell. . 



Brampton . . 
Brantford . . 
Brigden 
Burford. . . . 
Burgessville 



Caledonia 

Chatham _ 

Chippawa Village (see end of this table) 

Clinton 

Comber 



Dashwood 

Delaware 

Dereham Township 

Dorchester 

Drayton 



Dresden . . 
Drumbo . . 
Dublin.. . 
Dundas. . 
Dunnville. 



Dutton.. 

Elmira 

Elora 

Embro 

Etobicoke Township 



Exeter 

Fergus 

Forest 

Gait 

Georgetown 



Glencoe. . . 
Goderich . . 
Granton . . . 

Guelph 

Hagersville 



Jan., 1913 

Jan., 1916 

April, 1922 

Mar., 1918 

Jan., 1915 

May, 1912 

Aug., 1912 

Nov., 1915 

Feb., 1915 

Sept., 1915 

Nov., 1911 

Feb., 1914 

Jan., 1918 

June, 1915 

Nov., 1916 

Oct., 1912 

Feb., 1915 



Mar., 1914 

May, 1915 

Sept., 1917 

Mar., 1915 

Sept., 1919 

Dec, 1914 

Mar., 1918 

April, 1915 

Dec, 1914 

Oct., 1917 

Jan., 1911 

June, 1918 

Sept., 1915 

Nov., 1913 

Nov., 1914 

Jan., 1915 

Aug., 1917 

June, 1916 

Nov., 1914 

Mar., 1917 

May, 1911 

Sept., 1913 

Aug., 1920 

Feb., 1914 

July, 1916 

Dec, 1910 

Sept., 1913 



$ c 
594.01 
623.49 



362.21 
2,818.80 



513.20 
381.65 



786.00 



5,020.08 
' 231.20 



973.81 
122.02 

1,650.00 
235.10 



31.29 
1,740.92 
1,009.28 



5,490.19 



447.01 



1,361.27 
489.52 



291.92 

16,180.60 

1,946.94 



$ c. 



136.72 



885.77 
2,611.04 



1,754.81 

320.37 

1,257.65 

2,584.63 



35.88 



3,055.02 

116.59 

72.82 
1,412.05 



631.82 
1,497.78 
7,736.26 



2,922.18 



1,120.95 
1,107.75 



709.04 



9,572.43 



1923 



HYDRO-ELECTRIC POWER COMMISSION 



11 



SYSTEM— Continued 

Power Supplied to it to 31st October, 1921, the Cash Receipts and Payments 
Amount Credited or Charged to Each Municipality in respect of Power Supplied 
Standing as a Credit or Charge to each Municipality at 31st October, 1922 



Cash receipts and 
payments on account 
of such Credits and 
Charges, also adjust- 
ments made during 
the year 


Interest at 4% per 

annum added during 

the year 


Net amount Credited 

or Charged in respect 

of power supplied in 

the year ending 

31st October, 1922 


Accumulated amount 

standing as a 
Credit or Charge on 
31st October, 1922 


Credited 


Charged 


Credited 


Charged 


Credited 


Charged 


Credit 


Charge 


$ c 


$ c. 
594.01 
623.49 


$ c. 
12.82 
11.81 


$ c 


$ c. 
328.94 
202.27 


$ c. 


$ c. 
341.76 
214.08 


$ c 












554.37 


554.37 


136.72 






2.45 


735.93 
415.64 


733.48 
424.13 

53.55 

515.72 

1,320.49 






362.21 
2,818.80 


8.49 
73.70 










20.15 




885.77 


18.05 


533.77 
1,310.37 
1,022.35 
1,149.05 






513.20 


10.12 








104.47 




1,693.76 




381.65 


7.48 




1,156.53 


1,754.81 
320.37 


37.30 

6.42 

50.31 

94.96 


2,053.89 

3,191.11 

258.93 


2 091 19 










3,197.53 

1,566.89 

2,182.01 

77 60 












396.21 






101.37 






745.34 


25.27 


143.53 




35.88 


.70 


108.69 
4,092.62 


107.99 

4,185.04 






5,020,08 


92.42 
















231.20 


4.51 






373.81 




369 30 


1,000.00 
116.59 


96.77 

2.42 

2.83 

56.48 


1,479.43 




672 36 






17.97 




20 39 


72.82 






335.20 


332.37 










510.25 


-• 1 978 78 




973.81 
122.02 

1,650.00 
235.10 
314.53 


21.03 

2.83 

43.16 
5.93 


43.40 
358.41 

70.48 

272.75 


64.43 
361.24 

113.64 
278.68 






























22.28 

29.05 

309.45 


53.26 

1,718.58 


1,021.89 
1,747.63 
2 246 83 


1,497.78 








2,582.40 






3,216.48 

91.13 

1,518.37 

1,480.31 

773.61 






31.29 
1,740.92 
1,009.28 


.67 
30.34 
22.68 




91.80 
1,548.71 
1,502.99 




















924.65 


90.14 




1,314.06 
1,150.95 

1,699.96 




5,490.19 


158.68 


1,309.63 
1,677.36 




1,120.95 


22.60 
44.31 












1,841.88 
732.80 


689.82 
741.61 




447.01 


8.81 






709.04 


14.22 


5,318.55 


5,332.77 




1,361.27 
489.52 


19.09 
9.11 


56.50 
989.90 


75.59 
999.01 










1,060.44 


360.93 


1,302.53 


10,175.45 




291.92 

16,353.73 
1.946.94 


5.97 

109.65 

43.31 


142.25 


148.22 






6,262.95 


6,326.43 






2,137.60 


2,180.91 



222 



FIFTEENTH ANNUAL REPORT OF THE 



No. 49 



NIAGARA 

Statement Showing the Net Credit or Charge to Each Municipality in respect of 

thereon, Adjustments Made and Interest added during the Year; also the Net 

in the Year Ending 31st October, 1922, and th2 Accumulated Amount 



Municipality 



Date 

commenced 

operating 



Net Credit or Charge at 
31st October, 1921 



Credit 



Charge 



Hamilton 

Harriston 

Hensall 

Hespeler *. 

Highgate 

Ingersoll 

Kitchener 

Lambeth 

Listowel 

London. . 

London Railway Commission 

Lucan 

Lynden 

Markham 

Milton 

Milverton 

Mimico 

Mitchell 

Moorefield 

Mount Brydges 

Newbury 

New Hamburg . 

New Toronto 

Niagara Falls 

Niagara-on-Lake 

Norwich 

Oil Springs 

Otterville 

Palmerston 

Paris 

Parkhill.. 

Petrolia . 

Plattsville 

Port Credit 

Port Dover 

Port Stanley 

Preston 

Princeton 

Queenston 

Ridgetown 

Rockwood 

Rodney 

St. George 

St. Jacobs 

St. Marvs 



Feb., 1911 

July, 1916 

Jan., 1917 

Feb., 1911 

Dec, 1916 



May, 

Jan., 

April, 

June, 

Jan., 



1911 
1911 
1915 
1916 
1911 



Aug., 1914 

Feb., 1915 

Nov., 1915 

April, 1920 

April, 1913 

June, 1916 

May, 1912 

Sept., 1911 

Mar., 1918 

Mar., 1915 

Mar., 1921 

Mar., 1911 

Feb., 1914 

Dec, 1915 

Aug., 1919 

May, 1912 

Feb., 1918 

Feb., 1916 

July, 1916 

Feb., 1914 

May, 1920 

May, 1916 

Dec, 1914 

Aug., 1912 

Dec, 1921 

April, 1912 

Jan., 1911 



Jan., 
Mar. 



1915 
1921 



Dec, 1915 

Sept., 1913 

Feb., 1917 

Sept., 1915 

Sept., 1917 

Mav, 1911 



233.42 
10,377.26 



2.69 

2,331.15 

46,520.49 



2,014.16 

448.42 

1,261.89 

2,446.65 

2,991.13 



654.37 
204.56 



13.17 



1,705.58 
3,058.69 



177.04 
1.097.92 



480.87 
3,177.80 



1,768.87 



842.88 



2,287.05 
191.47 



948.58 



$ c. 
24,449.94 
572.44 
312.18 
519.39 



5,338.77 



1,215.27 



793.81 



82.43 



396.67 
8,293.83 
7,352.04 



303.23 



907.46 



873.01 
165.21 



997.29 

907.22 

12.60 



1,585.67 
' 105.45 



923 



HYDRO-ELECTRIC POWER COMMISSION 



223 



SYSTEM— Continued 

Power Supplied to it to 31st October, 1921, the Cash Receipts and Payments 
Amount Credited or Charged to Each Municipality in respect of Power Supplied 
Standing as a Credit or Charge to each Municipality at 31st October, 1922 



Cash receipts and 
payments on account 
of such Credits and 
Charges, also adjust- 
ments made during 
the year 


Interest at 4% per 

annum added during 

the year 


Net amount Credited 

or Charged in respect 

of power supplied in 

the year ending 

31st October, 1922 


Accumulated amount 

standing as a 
Credit or Charge on 
31st October, 1922 


Credited 


Charged 


Credited 


Charged 


Credited 


Charged 


Credit 


Charge 


% c 
24,449.94 
572.44 


$ c. 


$■ c 


$ c. 
482. 3C 

20.95 
5.30 

12.91 


$ c. 


$ c. 
53,638.19 


$ c. 


$ c. 
54,120.49 






55.74 


34.79 


312.18 






511.57 
59.30 


516 87 


519.39 










72 71 




233.42 
10,377.26 


4.29 
188.34 


42.68 
254.42 


46.97 

442.76 














213.55 


12,376.92 


17,929.24 




2.69 

2,331.15 
46,520.49 


.09 

36.02 

219.57 


1,006.98 


1,007.07 






335.94 
15,090.91 

8,266.17 
104.21 


299 92 










14,871.34 

8,295.07 
63 14 


1,215.27 


28.90 






2,014.16 

448.42 

1,261.89 

2,496.52 

2,991.13 


41.07 

8.43 

27.24 

49.87 

57.04 










388.39 

2,288.94 

705.42 


396.82 

2,316.18 

705.42 

32.21 
























'24.83 
1,655.85 




793.81 


23.84 




1,679.69 




654.37 
204.56 


11.04 
4.80 


33.16 


44.20 






161.29 


156 49 


82.43 


1.73 


204.08 
268.19 


202.35 
268.47 






13.17 


.28 






396.67 


7.95 
197.74 
182.36 


28.47 

6,832,34 

11,449.92 


36 42 


8,293.83 
6,934.90 










■7,030.08 
12,049.42 










1,705.58 
3,082.53 


33.12 
26.28 


154.41 


187.53 






104.50 


102 06 




12.13 


2,180.18 

38.49 

335.47 


1,864.82 

42.03 

351.16 






177.04 
1,097.92 


3.54 
15.69 














907.46 


14.02 


614.58 


628 60 




480.87 
3,177.80 


10.84 
58.51 


596.91 

580.48 


607.75 
638.99 














34.92 
2.91 


532.38 
972.60 


1,440.31 
975 51 


165.21 
















233.20 

849.26 
154.07 
257.72 


233.20 

890.86 
130.36 






1,768.87 


41.60 








997.25 


23.71 

35.36 

.22 


.... 




300.0C 








384 86 


12.6C 







115.66 




115 88 




842.88 


17.03 


627.55 

525.96 

388.17 
572.13 
263.92 
516.10 


644.58 




435.47 


54.59 




678 83 




2,334.55 
191.47 


47.55 
4.41 




388.22 
576.54 
262.12 
536.58 












105.45 


1.80 








948.58 


20.48 








224 



FIFTEENTH ANNUAL REPORT OF THE 



No. 49 



NIAGARA 

Statement Showing the Net Credit or Charge to Each Municipality in respect of 

thereon, Adjustments Made and Interest added during the Year; also the Net 

in the Year Ending 31st October, 1922, and the Accumulated Amount 



Municipality 



Date 

commenced 

operating 



Net Credit or Charge at 
31st October, 1921 



Credit 



Charge 



St. Thomas ......... 

Sarnia 

Scarboro Township , 

Seaforth 

Simcoe 



Springfield 

Stamford Township , 

Stratford 

Strathroy 

Streetsville 



Tavistock. . 
Thamesford . 
Thamesville , 
Thedford . . . 
Thorndale. . 



Tilbury 

Tillsonburg 

Toronto 

Toronto Township 
Walkerville 



Wallaceburg . 
Wardsville . . 
Waterdown . 
Waterford . . , 
Waterloo. . . 



Watford 
Welland 
Wellesley . . . 
West Lome , 
Weston 



Windsor 

Woodbridge . 
Woodstock . 
Wyoming . . . 
Zurich 



April, 1911 

Dec, 1916 

Aug., 1918 

Nov. 1911 

Aug., 1915 

Aug., 1917 

Nov., 1916 

Jan., 1911 

Dec, 1914 



Nov., 1916 
Feb., 1914 
Oct., 1915 



Mar., 1914 

April, 1915 

Aug., 1911 

June, 1911 

Aug., 1913 

Nov., 1914 



Feb., 
June, 
Nov., 
April, 
Dec, 



1915 
1921 
1911 
1915 
1910 



Sept., 1917 

Sept., 1917 

Nov., 1916 

Jan., 1917 

Jan., 1911 

Oct., 1914 

Dec, 1914 

Jan., 1911 

Nov., 1916 

Sept., 1917 



15,478.49 
' 189.81 



414.23 
1,864.48 
1,514.02 
4,524.99 

1,118.77 
218.21 
330.30 



14,564.09 
6,332.08 



312.10 



38.66 
2,184.30 



29,373.26 



$ c 
972.51 



811.91 
560.81 

54.28 



1,910.24 

2,638.05 

1,501.62 

76,929.90 

416.81 



34.83 
155.77 



439.71 

929.51 
2,381.46 



1,453.36 



103.15 
2,688.07 
1,572.97 

533.38 



1923 



HYDRO-ELECTRIC POWER COMMISSION 



225 



SYSTEM— Continued 

Power Supplied to it to 31st October, 1921, the Cash Receipts and Payments 
Amount Credited or Charged to Each Municipality in respect of Power Supplied 
Standing as a Credit or Charge to each Municipality at 31st October, 1922 



Cash receipts and 
payments on account 
of such Credits and 
Charges, also adjust- 
ments made during 
the year 



Interest at 4% per 

annum added during 

the year 



Net amount Credited 

or Charged in respect 

of power supplied in 

the year ending 

31st October, 1922 



Accumulated amount 

standing as a 
Credit or Charge on 
31st October, 1922 



Credited Charged 



Credited 



Charged 



Credited 



Charged 



Credit 



Charge 



$ c. 
972.51 


$ c. 


$ c 


$ c. 
22.59 


$ c. 

782.01 

3,156.41 

685.51 


$ c. 


$ c 

759.42 

3,417.37 

661.49 


$ c. 




15,478.49 


260.96 






811.91 


24.02 








189.81 


4.10 


196.99 


192.89 


560.81 


11.68 
2.17 


734.82 
192.28 


723.14 
135.83 
















414.23 
1,864.48 
1,514.02 


7.35 

36.78 

12.92 

181.00 

23.42 
4.30 
6.33 


239.21 
1,309.52 


231 86 










1,272 74 






355.47 
445.36 

6.15 
862.64 
710.68 
152.41 
192.30 

2,106.73 


368.39 
5,151.35 

6.15 
866.94 
717.01 
152.41 














1,142.19 
218.21 
330.30 




























553 74 






57.91 

76.28 

30.11 

1,273.03 

8.86 




1,222.11 


2,714.33 








2,106.73 


1,501.62 






1,101.87 
142,846.26 


1,131.98 


76,929.90 






18.29 
12,816.20 

358.97 




144,119 90 


416.81 






9.43 
13,100.30 

514.28 




14,564.09 
6,332.08 


284.10 
155 31 










34.83 


.74 
3.02 


46.59 


47 33 


155.77 






50.27 

574.77 


47.25 
581.51 






312.10 


6.74 






439.71 


9.34 

23.29 
95.26 


2,174.50 


2,183.84 


1,340.22 






1,212.41 


1,599.83 










5,132.36 
193.88 

794.94 


7,609.08 




38.66 
2,184.30 


76 
41.90 






193.12 






1,081.91 


1,123.81 




1,453.36 


35.68 


830.62 




29,373.26 


473.19 


24,857.81 


25,331.00 




103.15 


2.53 
54.20 
62.92 
10.811 


143.58 

731.07 

85.63 


146.11 


2,688.07 










785.27 










1,721.52 


533.38 




' 201.97 


191.16 



8 H.C 



226 



FIFTEENTH ANNUAL REPORT OF THE 



No. 49 



NIAGARA 

Statement Showing the Net Credit or Charge to Each Municipality in respect of 

thereon, Adjustments made and Interest added during the Year; also the Net 

in the Year Ending 31st October, 1922, and the Accumulated Amount 



Municipality 



Date 

commenced 

operating 



Net Credit or Charge at 
31st October, 1921 



Credit 



Charge 



Aylmer Rural Power District . . . 
Baden Rural Power District .... 
Chatham Rural Power District . . 

Brant Rural Power District 

Dorchester Rural Power District 



Drumbo Rural Power District . 
Dundas Rural Power District . 

Gait Rural Power District 

Ingersoll Rural Power District 
Jordan Rural Power District . . 



Lynden Rural Power District . . . 
Niagara Rural Power District . . . 
Preston Rural Power District . . . 
Ridgetown Rural Power District 
Saltfleet Rural Power District . . . 



Sandwich Rural Power District . . 
Stamford Rural Power District . . 
Welland Rural Power District . . . 
Woodstock Rural Power District 



Municipalities which are supplied with power 
directly from the Ontario Power Co. 



Merritton 

Port Colborne. . . 
St. Catharines. . . . 
Chippawa Village 
Chippawa R.P.D. 



Welland (Pt. Robinson) 
Grantham Township. . . 
Port Dalhousie 



Nov., 1920 



May, 1922 

Oct., 1914 

Dec, 1921 

Aug., 1922 

Jan., 1921 

Oct., 1922 

Oct., 1914 

May, 1922 

Feb., 1922 

Jan., 1922 

Apr., 1922 

Mar., 1922 

Feb., 1922 

July, 1922 

Mar., 1922 

Apr., 1922 

Feb., 1913 



Nov. 1920 
Mar. 1920 



$ c. 



219.55 



Sept. 1919 

July, 1922 

Mar., 1913 

May, 1915 

Nov., 1912 



259.9< 



274.9( 



l,356.6fc 



503.5. c 
442.0[ 



821.19 



61.68 

14.97 

212.78 



211,161.87 



$ c 
733.49 



191,547.90 



1923 



HYDRO-ELECTRIC POWER COMMISSION 



227 



SYSTEM— Continued 

Power Supplied to it to 31st October, 1921, the Cash Receipts and Payments 
Amount Credited or Charged to Each Municipality in respect of Power Supplied 
Standing as a Credit or Charge to each Municipality at 31st October, 1922 



Cash receipts and 
payments on account 
of such Credits and 
Charges, also adjust- 
ments made during 
the year 


Interest at 4% per 

annum added during 

the year 


Net amount Credited 

or Charged in respect 

of power supplied in 

the year ending 

31st October, 1922 


Accumulated amount 

standing as a 
Credit or Charge on 
31st October, 1922 


Credited 


Charged 


Credited 


Charged 


Credited 


Charged 


Credit 


Charge 


$ c. 


$ c 


$ c. 


$ c. 
29.34 


$ c. 


$ c. 
577.01 
388.52 


$ c 


$ c. 
1,339.84 












388.52 










873.10 

466.35 

3,548.96 

143.30 

1,065.32 

56.71 

12.00 

153.55 

120.73 

590.28 

4,763.31 

2,149.39 

3,503.46 

491.77 
564.11 
184.95 


873.10 

694.68 

3,548.96 

143.30 

1,335.81 

56.71 

297.96 

153.55 

120.73 

590.28 

4,763.31 

2,149.39 

3,503.46 

491.77 

564.11 

184.95 

1,402.63 








8.78 






























10.40 






















11.00 






















































































































54.27 
7.43 




8.32 

720.88 

404.13 

10,720.94 






317.92 
588.38 






527 79 




5.86 






556 29 








10,720.94 




821.19 


19.53 




346.71 
464.73 


366.24 
464.73 














2.47 

.60 

8.51 




760.04 
324.80 
714.19 


695 89 












309 23 










492 90 














150,318.89 


204,788.54 


3,277.16 


4,562.97 


110,117.72 


307.257.73 


110.304.21 


343.585.74 



228 



FIFTEENTH ANNUAL REPORT OF THE 



No. 49 



NIAGARA SYSTEM RURAL LINES 

Statement Showing the Interest and Sinking Fund Charged by The Commission to 

the Municipalities which operate the respective Rural Lines for 

the year ending 31st October, 1922 



Operated by 


Capital 
cost 


Interest 


Sinking Fund 


Total interest 

and 

Sinking Fund 

Charged 


Ancaster 


$ c, 
5,159.03 
2,110.45 
6,571.84 

588 87 


$ c. 

257.96 

105.52 

355 88 

29.44 

33.68 

1,483.42 

38.90 

2,984.10 

444.48 

115.66 

16.66 

40.70 

1,732.98 


$ c 
92.86 
37.98 

547.44 
10.60 
12.12 

526.36 
14.00 

982.96 

160.00 

41.64 

6.00 

14.64 

619.66 


$ c 
350.82 


Bolton 


143.50 


Bothwell 


903.32 


Brampton 


40.04 


Chatham 


45.80 


Dereham Township 


29,243.50 

777 82 

54,608.68 

8,889.59 

2,313.36 

333.26 

813.82 

34,425.48 


2,009.78 


Elora 


52.90 


Etobicoke 


3,967.06 


Georgetown 


604.48 


Goderich 


157.30 


Lucan 


22.66 


Milton 


55.34 


Norwich 


2,352.64 


Preston 


St. Thomas 


1,933.82 

29,892.77 

4,058.47 

628.65 

21,972.39 

45,477.76 

13,370.80 

3,399.87 

5,062.60 

5,234.46 

26,653.12 

1,088.20 

2,771.19 

31.33 


96.70 

1,722.92 

202.92 

44.00 

1,235 78 

2,333.01 

691.72 

170.00 

230.60 

209.38 

1,529.97 

54.42 

138.56 


34.80 

" 538.08 

73.04 

15.84 

396.16 

818.60 

240.68 

61.20 

91.14 

94.22 

479.76 

19.58 

49.88 


131.50 


Scarboro Township 


2,261.00 


Stratford 


275.96 


Toronto 


59 84 


Vaughan Township 


1,631.94 


Walkerville 


3,151.61 


Waterdown 


932.40 


Waterford .... 


231.20 


Waterloo 


321.74 


Weston .... 


303.60 


Windsor ... 


2,009.73 


Woodstock 


74.00 


Louth Township 


188.44 


Non-Operating 












307,411.13 


16,299.36 


5,979.24 


22,278.60 







923 



HYDRO-ELECTRIC POWER COMMISSION 



229 



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230 FIFTEENTH ANNUAL REPORT OF THE No. 49 



SEVERN 
Operating Account for Year 

Costs of Operation as Provided for under Sections 6c and 23 of the Act 

Power purchased from Wasdell System and Orillia $13,847.34 

Costs of operating and maintaining the Generating Plant, Transmission 
Lines, Stations, etc., including the proportion of Administrative 

Expenses chargeable to the operation of this System 67,110.27 

Interest on Capital Investment 62,509.06 

Provisions for Renewal of Generating Plant, Lines and Stations, etc 20,053.97 

Provisions for Contingencies: 

By charges against Municipalities $4,866.40 

By charges against contracts with Private Companies, also the Eugenia 

System, which purchased power 1,445.20 

By appropriating the net profit on power sold to Private Companies. . 6,198.85 



Provisions for Sinking Fund: 

By charges against Municipalities 16,853.59 

J3y charges against contracts with Private Companies, also the Eugenia 

System, which purchased power 4,400.12 



12,510.45 



21,253.71 
$197,284.80 



1923 HYDRO-ELECTRIC POWER COMMISSION 231 



SYSTEM 

Ending 31st October, 1922 



Revenue for Period 



Collected from Municipalities $187,860.89 

Power sold to Private Companies and the Eugenia System 40,697.47 

Add amounts due by certain Municipalities being the difference between 

sums paid and the costs of power supplied to them in the period $626.64 

Deduct amounts collected from certain Municipalities in excess of the 

sum required to be paid by them for power supplied in the period.. . . 31,900.20 

31,273.56 



Revenue 197,284.80 

$197,284.80 



232 



FIFTEENTH ANNUAL REPORT OF THE 



No. 49 



SEVERN 

Statement Showing the Amount to be Paid by Each Municipality as the Cost, under 

Received by the Commission from Each Municipality on Account of Such Cost, 

upon ascertainment (by Annual Adjustment) of the Actual Cost of 





Interim Rates per 


Share of 
Capital Cost 
of system on 

which 
interest and 

fixed 

charges are 

payable 


Average 
Horse- 
power 
supplied in 
year after 
correction 
for power 
factor 


Cost of 
Power pur- 
chased from 
Orillia and 
Wasdells 

system 


Share of Operating 


Municipality 


Horsepower collected 

by Commission 

during year 


Operating, 
Main- 
tenance 
and 

Adminis- 
trative 

expenses 


Interest 




To 

Dec. 31, 

1921 


To 

Oct. 31, 

1922 




Alliston 


$ c. 
60.00 


$ c. 
65.00 


S c. 
67,702.03 


111.9 


$ c. 

245.50 


S c. 
1,877.80 


S c. 
2,894.19 


Barrie 


29.00 
85.00 
75.00 


29.00 
85.00 
75.00 


177.192.67 
61.101.98 

54,743.86 


866.9 
84.5 
58.9 


1,901.94 
185.39 
129.22 


8,703.53 
1,785.42 
1,572.28 


7,586.17 
2,615.41 
2,343.17 


Beeton 

Bradford 


Coldwater 

Collingwood . . . 
Cookstown .... 
Creemore 


60.00 
36.00 
60.00 
65.00 


60.00 
45.00 
60.00 
70.00 


20,291.23 

277,030.92 

22,990.20 

24,754.14 


83.7 
1,124.3 

52.1 
53. 


183.64 

2,466.66 

114.30 

116.28 


829.75 

14,377.48 

901.89 

1,050.14 


868.80 

11,759.43 

984.13 

1,059.61 


Elmvale 


37.00 


37.00 


30,481.93 


150.8 


330.85 


1,693.83 


1,305.03 


Midland 


32.00 


32.00 


231,618.34 


1,290.3 


2,830.86 


11,060.06 


9,916.72 


Penetang 

Port McXicoll. 


30.00 

85.00 


30.00 
40.00 


132,207.66 
8,888.64 


695.1 
43.3 


1,525.02 
95.00 


6,026.09 
489.38 


5,660.34 
379.06 


Stayner 


40.00 


45.00 


30,484.00 


120.5 


264.37 


1,717.50 


1,305.04 


Thornton 

Tottenham .... 


85.00 
90.00 


85.00 
90.00 


11,599.45 
37,845.15 


13.8 
38.6 


30.28 
84.68 


383.78 
1,174.43 


496.50 
1,619.85 


Victoria Harbor 


45.00 


45.00 


12,872.55 


46. 


100.92 


762.32 


549.36 


Waubaushene . . 1 


45.00 


45.00 


6,876.08 


25.4 


55.72 


389.40 


294.37 


Xottawasaga Rural Power Districts 


12,439.41 


7.3 


16.02 


615.19 


409.36 


Totals — Municip 
Totals — Compan 
Xon -operating C 

Grand Totals . 
50% Eugenia 
above Capita 


alities 


1,221,120.24 

266,781.32 
814.29 


4,866.4 

1.445.2 


10,676.65 
3,170.69 


55,390.27 
11,720.00 


52,046.54 


ies 


apital 


10,462.52 












1,488,715.85 
46,413.95 


6,311.6 


13,847.34 


67,110.27 


62,509.06 


Tie Line included in 

a 



1923 



HYDRO-ELECTRIC POWER COMMISSION 



233 



SYSTEM 

Section 23 of the Act, of Power Supplied to it by the Commission, the Amount 
and the Amount remaining to be Credited or Charged to Each Municipality 
Power Supplied to it in the Year Ending 31st October, 1922 



Costs and Fixed Charges. 


Total Cost 

of Power 

for year as 

provided to 

be paid 

under 

section 23 

of Act 


Amounts 
paid to the 
Com- 
mission 
by each 
munici- 
pality 


Amounts remaining to 

be Credited or Charged 

to each municipality 

upon ascertainment of 

the actual cost of 

power by annual 

adjustment 


Sinking Fund 
for the years 
mentioned 
hereunder 
charged as 
part of the 
cost of power 
in the year 
1921-1922 


Renewals 


Contin- 
gencies 


Sinking 
Fund 




Credited 


Charged 


$ c. 
912 89 


$ c. 
111.90 

866.90 
84.50 
58.90 

83.70 

1,124.30 

52.10 

53.00 

150 80 

1,290.30 

695.10 
43.30 

120.50 

13.80 
38.60 

46.00 

25.40 

7.30 


$ c 


$ c. 
6,042.28 

23,926.97 
5,495.67 
4,842.65 

2,534.44 

39,248.89 

2,362.83 

2,991.53 

4,421.65 

31,978.95 

18,072.46 
1,254.11 

4,376.14 

1,080.98 
3,428.49 

1,826.14 

955.50 

1,747.65 


$ c. 
7,165.34 

25,140.07 
6,913.00 
4,415.60 

4,505.50 

48,748.50 

2,972.50 

3,465.94 

5,580.96 

41,288.52 

20,853.87 
2,085.32 

' 5,318.93 

1,173.69 
3,474.75 

2,068.48 

1,141.86 

1,548.06 


, $ c. 
1,123.06 

1,213.10 
1,417.33 


$ c. 




2 392.83 


2,475.60 




1919-20 


824.95 






739.08 


427.05 




274.04 

3,709.16 

310.41 


294.51 
5,811.86 


1,971.06 
9,499.61 


1919-20 
1919-20 






334.22 


398.28 

529.51 

3,753.07 

2,380.52 
127.81 

557.09 


474.41 

1,159.31 

9,309.57 

2,781.41 
831.21 

942.79 

92.71 
46.26 

242.34 

186.36 




1918-19 


411.63 




1919-20 


3,127.94 




1919-20 


1,785.39 




1921-22 


119.56 




1918-19 


411.64 




1919-20 


156.62 






510.93 








173.28 


194.26 

97.76 

233.32 




■1918-19 


92.85 




1918-19 


466.46 


199.59 


1921-22 








16,753.88 
3,300.09 


4,866.40 
1,445.20 


16,853.59 
4,400.12 


156,587.33 
34,498.62 


187,860.89 
40,697.47 


31,900.20 
*6, 198.85 


626.64 




20,053.97 


6,311.60 


21,253.71 


191,085.95 


228,558.36 





*Note — Transferred to credit of Contingency Reserve. 



234 



FIFTEENTH ANNUAL REFORT OF THE 



No. <9 



SEVERN SYSTEM 

Reserve for Contingencies Account, 31st October, 1922 

Balance brought forward, 31st October, 1921 

Amount added on account of reduction in Cost of Power to Sundry Com- 
panies, due to reduction in depreciation rate from commencement of 

operations 

Added during the year ending 31st October, 1922: 

Amounts charged to Municipalities as part of the Cost of Power 

delivered to them. . $4,866.40 

Provision against equipment employed in respect of contracts with 

Sundry Companies 1,445.20 

Net profits from contracts with Sundry Power Customers 6,198.85 

Interest at 4% per annum on monthly balances to the credit of the 

account 871.86 

Expenditures during the year ending 31st October, 1922 

Balance carried forward 31st October, 1922 



$7,128.08 



14,668.51 



13,382.31 

$35,178.90 
5,958.82 

$29,220.08 



SEVERN 

Statement Showing the Total Sinking Fund Requirements to be met by each 
Deferred by the Commission under Section 23 of the Act, Sinking Fund Pay- 
five years, and the Total of Such Sinking Fund Payments including 



Municipality 



Total Sinking Fund requirements 

chargeable to the municipality 

under the Act 



(a) 



For period of 



(b) Amount 



Sinking Fund requirements the 

payment of which has been 

deferred 



(a) For period of 



(b) Amount 



Alliston . . . 
Barrie 

Beeton 

Bradford . . 
Coldwater 



Collingwood 
Cookstown . 
Creemore. . . 

Elmvale 

Midland . . . 



5 years ending 31 Oct., 1922 

6 " " 

5 " " 

C U U 

6 " " 
6 " " 

r U u 

6 " " 

6 " " 



1922 

" 1922 

" 1922 

" 1922 

" 1922 

" 1922 

" 1922 

" 1922 

" 1922 



Penetang 

Port McNicoll. 

Stayner 

Thornton 

Tottenham 



Victoria Harbor 
Waubaushene . . 
Nottawasaga. 



6 " 

6 " 

6 " 

4 " 

5 " 

6 " 
6 " 
1 " 



" 1922 

" 1922 

" 1922 

" 1922 

" 1922 



" 1922 
" 1922 
" 1922 



Rural Power District. 



Totals — Municipalities 

Totals — Companies (from commencement of 
operations 

Grand Totals 



9 c. 
5,684.10 
13,270.78 
4,975.00 
3,820.69 
1,669.66 

29,786.26 
2,013.54 
2,458.25 
2,664.39 

20,808.84 

12,458.65 
805.76 

2,735.53 
781.55 

2,578.68 

1,224.81 
631.75 
233.32 



5 years ending 31 Oct., 1922 
2 " " " 1922 

5 " " " 1922 

5 " " " 1922 

2 " " " 1922 



108,601.56 
19,379.41 



127,980.97 



" 1922 

" 1922 

" 1922 

" 1922 

" 1922 



3 years ending 31 Oct. 
2 « « « 

a u a « 

5 " " " 



1922 
1922 
1922 
1922 



" 1922 
" 1922 



$ c. 
5,684.10 
6,210.01 
4,975.00 
3,820.69 
704.11 

9,544.86 
2,013.54 
1,306.22 
1,136.48 
8,377.62 



471.88 
1,144.18 

781.55 
2,578.68 

720.38 
369.46 



49,838.76 



49.838.76 



1923 HYDRO-ELECTRIC POWER COMMISSION 

SEVERN SYSTEM 

Reserve for Renewals Account, 31st October, 1922 

Total provision for Renewals to 31st October, 1921 $ 235,243.10 

Less reductions upon adjustment of Renewals Rates 119,976.30 

Deduct expenditures to 31st October, 1921 

Balance brought forward 31st October. 1921 

Added during the year ending 31st October, 1922: 

Amounts charged to municipalities as part of the Cost of Power 

delivered to them 16,753.88 

Provision against equipment employed in respect of contracts with 

Sundry Companies 3,300.09 

Interest at 4% per annum on monthly balances to the credit of the 

account 4,294.84 

Renewals reserve provided on second-hand equipment purchased . . 1,533.14 

Expenditures during the year ending 31st October, 1922 

Balance carried forward 31st October, 1922 



235 



$ 115,271.80 
7,900.89 

107,370.91 



25,881.95 

133,252.86 
509.14 

$ 132,743.72 



SYSTEM 

Municipality, Sinking Fund Requirements the Payment of which has been 
ments made by Certain Municipalities which have been Operating more than 
Interest allowed thereon to 31st October, 1922. 



Sinking Fund requirements paid 
(or charged) as part of the cost of power 


Interest at 4% per 

annum allowed 

on Sinking Fund 

requirements which 
have been paid 


Total Sinking Fund 

payments and 

accumulated interest 

to the credit of the 


(a) For period of 


(b) Amount 


municipality on 
31st October, 1922 




$ c. 


$ c. 


$ c, 


4 years ending 31 Oct., 1920 


7,060.77 


351.70 


7,412.47 










4 years ending 31 Oct., 1920 
4 " " " 1920 


965.55 
20,242.40 


53.37 
1,113.26 


1,018.92 
21,355.66 


3 years ending 31 Oct., 1919 

4 " " " 1920 
4 " " " 1920 

6 " " " 1922 

3 " " " 1919 

4 " « " 1920 


1,152.03 

1,527.91 

12,431.22 

12,458.65 

333.88 

1,591.35 


46.55 

73.76 

623.11 

1,072.20 
12.42 

73.77 


1,198.58 

1,601.67 

13,054.33 

13,530.85 

346.30 

1,665.12 










3 years ending 31 Oct., 1919 
3 " " " 1919 
1 " " " 1922 


504.43 
262.29 
233.32 


18.74 
9.96 


523.17 
272.25 
233.32 








(From commencement of 
operations) 


58,763.80 
19,379.41 


3,448.84 
2,021.33 


62,212.64 
21,400.74 




78,143.21 


5,470.17 


83,613.38 



236 



FIFTEENTH ANNUAL REPORT OF THE 



No. 49 



SEVERN 

Statement Showing the Net Credit or Charge to each Municipality in Respect of 

thereon, Adjustments made and Interest added during the Year; also the Net 

in the year Ending 31st October, 1922, and the Accumulated Amount 



Municipality- 



Date 

commenced 

operating 



Net Credit or Charge at 
31st October, 1921 



Credit 



Charge 



Amounts 

Credited 

upon 

adjustment 

of renewals 



Alliston . . . 
Barrie 
Beeton. . . . 
Bradford. . 
Coldwater , 



Collingwood 

Cookstown 

Creemore 

Elmvale 

Midland 

(No capital invested prior to 1914) 



Penetang 

Port McNicoll 

Stayner 

Thornton 

Tottenham 



Victoria Harbor .... 

Waubaushene 

Nottawasaga R.P.D. 



Totals . 



June, 


1918 


April, 


1913 


Aug., 


1918 


Oct., 


1918 


Mar., 


1913 


Mar., 


1913 


May, 


1918 


Nov., 


1914 


June, 


1913 


July, 


1911 


Tuly, 


1911 


Jan., 


1915 


Oct., 


1913 


Nov., 


1918 


Oct., 


1918 


Tuly, 


1914 


Dec, 


1914 







1,466.34 
523.49 



231.49 



484.22 



2,705.54 



$ c. 
7,952.10 
4,201.41 
4,254.80 
8,470.66 
1,842.49 

7,572.28 
1,687.50 



12,462.64 
636.91 



718.56 
1,664.39 
4,519.96 



191.78 



56,175.48 



3,639.58 
15,649.24 
3,162.54 
2,297.83 
1,949.11 

31,193.28 
1,309.41 
2,770.37 
2,667.51 

19,030.34 



13,504.68 

784.13 

3,320.92 

462.38 

1,538.69 

1,402.79 
624.99 



105,307.79 



EUGENIA 
Operating Account for 

Costs of Operation as Provided for under Sections 6c and 23 of the Act 

Power purchased from Severn System $4,689.1 8 

Costs of operating and maintaining the Generating Plant, Transmission 
Lines, Stations, etc., including the proportion of Administrative 

Expenses chargeable to the operation of this System 73,818.54 

Interest on Capital Investment 92,207.34 

Provision for Renewal of Generating Plant, Lines, Stations, etc 25,111.30 

Provisions for Contingencies: 

By charges against Municipalities $5,230.10 

By charges against contracts with private companies, which pur- 
chased power 143.50 

5,373.60 

Provisions for Sinking Fund : 

By charges against Municipalities $24,269.80 

By charges against contracts with private companies which pur- 
chased power 1 ,072.06 

25,341.86 

$226,541.82 



1923 



HYDRO-ELECTRIC POWER COMMISSION 



237 



SYSTEM 

Power Supplied to it to 31st October, 1921, the Cash Receipts and Payments 
Amount Credited or Charged to each Municipality in respect of Power supplied 
standing as a Credit or Charge to each Municipality at 31st October, 1922 



Cash receipts and 

payments on account 

of such Credits and 

Charges during 

the year 


Interest at 4% per 

annum added during 

the year 


Net amount Credited 

or Charged in respect 

of power supplied in 

the year ending 
31st October, 1922 


Accumulated amount 

standing as a 

Credit or Charge on 

31st October, 1922 


Credited 


Charged 


Credited 


Charged 


Credited 


Charged 


Credit 


Charge 


$ c. 


$ c. 


$ c. 


$ c. 
172.74 


$ c. 
1,123.06 
1,213.10 
1,417.33 


$ c. 


$ c. 


$ c. 
3,362.20 






457.92 




13,118.85 
281.38 








43.69 
246.92 












427.05 


6,846.80 






4.26 
944.84 


1,971.06 

9,499.61 

609.67 

474.41 

1,159.31 

9,309.57 

2,781.41 

831.21 

942.79 

92.71 


2,081.94 

34,065.45 

216.46 

3,396.83 

3,944.82 

28,649.05 

16,812.74 
1,650.29 
4,383.09 


















15.12 








1,466.34 
523.49 


152.05 
118.00 
309.14 

526.65 

34.95 

119.38 














12,462.64 








636.91 












231.49 








718.56 












48.08 
119.25 




1,157.38 








46.26 

242.34 
186.36 






3,054.26 




484.22 


68.38 
19.27 




1,713.51 
830.62 




191.78 














199.59 


199.59 
















14,009.89 


2,705.54 


2,754.84 


645.80 


31,900.20 


626.64 


111,145.03 


14,620.23 



SYSTEM 

Year Ending 31st October, 1922 

Revenue for Period 

Collected from Municipalities 

Power sold to Private Companies 

Add amounts due by certain Municipalities being the difference between 

sums paid and the costs of power supplied to them in the period $9,351.17 

Deduct amounts collected from certain Municipalities in excess of the 

sum required to be paid by them for power supplied in the period. . . 32,929.63 

Revenue • 

Loss on Sale of Power supplied to Private Companies (written off against 
Contingency Reserve) 



$242,352.59 
7,104.25 

$249,456.84 



23,578.46 

$225,878.38 

663.44 



$226,541.82 



238 



FIFTEENTH ANNUAL REPORT OF THE 



No. 49 



EUGENIA 

Statement Showing the Amount to be Paid by Each Municipality as the Cost — 

Received by the Commission from Each Municipality on Account of such 

upon Ascertainment (by Annual Adjustment) of the Actual 



Municipality 



Interim rates per 

Horsepower collected 

by Commission 

during Year 



To 

Dec. 31, 

1921 



To 

Oct. 31, 

1922 



Share of 
Capital Cost 
of system on 

which 
interest and 
fixed charges 
are payable 



Average 
Horse- 
power 
supplied in 
year after 
correction 
for power 
factor 



Cost of 
Power 
purchased 
from 
Severn 
system 



Share of Operating 



Operating, 
Main- 
tenance 

and 
Adminis- 
trative 
expenses 



Interest 



Arthur 

Cbatsworth . . 

Chesley 

Dundalk 

Durham 

Elmwood. . . . 
Flesherton . . . 
Grand Valley. 

Hanover 

Holstein 



Kincardine. . . 

Lucknow 

Markdale. . . . 
Mount Forest 
Neustadt 



Orangeville. . 
Owen Sound. 
Priceville 

Ripley 

Shelburne. . . 



Tara 

Teeswater . 
Wingham . 



$ c. 
85.00 
60.00 
55.00 
50.00 
50.00 

55.00 
45.00 
70.00 
40.00 
90.00 

48.00 
60.00 
50.00 
65.00 
55.00 

65.00 
30.00 
47.00 
60.00 
50.00 

90.00 
40.00 
45.00 



$ c 
85.00 
70.00 
55.00 
55.00 
50.00 

55.00 
55.00 
60.00 
35.00 
90.00 

48.00 
60.00 
50.00 
65.00 
55.00 

65.00 
40.00 
47.00 
60.00 
50.00 

90.00 
40.00 
45.00 



Flesherton Rural Power District .... 
Walkerton Quarry Rural Power Dist. 



Totals — Municipalities . 
Totals — Companies. . . . 
Non-operating Capital. 



Grand Totals . 



$ c 
80,105.00 
12,532.91 
101,460.10 
26,851.53 
89,408.27 

14,972.26 
15,851.81 
34,660.97 
355,765.15 
12,126.35 

107,705.29 
55,709.19 
23,805.79 
75,133.68 
74,464.82 

94,006.13 

399,647.28 

6,431.07 

50,884.34 

51,261.77 

42,434.88 

56,249.99 

171,844.29 

2,343.04 
1.889.86 



1,957,545.77 

59,951.21 

103.61 



2,017,600.59 



120.3 
36.5 

262.3 
90.5 

339.9 

36.9 

44.8 



65. 

1,270 . 

10. 

134. 

76. 

90. 
180. 
191. 



188.4 

1,452.4 

9.2 

65.3 

144.6 

45.3 
108.8 
263.5 



1.1 



5,230.1 
143.5 



5,373 .6 



$ c 
104.98 

31.85 
228.89 

78.97 
296.62 

32.20 

39.09 

56.98 

1,108.51 

9.25 

117.02 

67.11 

78.88 

157.52 

167.02 

164.40 

1,267.41 

8.03 

56.98 

126.18 

39.53 

94.94 

229.94 

.70 
.96 



4,563.96 
125.22 



4,689.18 



$ c. 
2,821.67 

446.74 
3,774.28 
1,239.92 
4,134.70 

821.17 

959.19 

1,240.95 

13,038.86 

324.05 

3,164.67 
1,661.15 
1,179.07 
3,244.80 
2,697.13 

3,406.68 

14,929.98 

194.58 

1,474.00 

2,368.68 

1,088.62 
1,887.53 
4,662.76 

65.93 

48.74 



70,875 85 
2,942.69 



73,818.54 



$ c. 
3,665.51 

576.86 
4,633.18 
1,230.72 
3,886.43 

684.37 

729.08 

1,594.31 

16,230.26 

556.00 

4,937.13 
2,552.67 
1,094 80 
3,453.65 
3,405.02 

4,320.82 

18,395.51 

295.87 

2,332.24 

2,354.79 

1,952.44 
2,573.47 
7,870.77 



76.18 
65.53 



89,467.61 
2,739.73 



92,207.34 



50% Tie Line Transferred to Severn System, $46,413.95 



1923 



HYDRO-ELECTRIC POWER COMMISSION 



239 



SYSTEM 

Under Section 23 of the Act,— of Power Supplied to it by the Commission, the Amount 
Cost, and the Amount Remaining to be Credited or Charged to Each Municipality 
Cost of Power Supplied to it in the Year Ending 31st October, 1922 



Costs and Fixed Charges. 


Total Cost 

of Power 

for year as 

provided to 

be paid 

under 

section 23 

of Act 


Amounts 
paid to the 
Com- 
mission 
by each 
municipality 


Amounts remaining to 

be credited or charged 

to each municipality 

upon ascertainment of 

the actual Cost of 

Power by annual 

adjustment 


Sinking fund 


Renewals 


Contin- 
gencies 


Sinking 
Fund 


mentioned 

hereunder 

charged as 

part of the 

Cost of Power 

in the year 

1921-1922 




Credited 


Charged 


$ c. 

996 06 


$ c. 
120.30 

36.50 
262.30 

90.50 
339.90 

36.90 
44.80 
65.30 
1,270.30 
10.60 

134.10 

76.90 

90.40 

180.50 

191.40 

188.40 

1,452.40 

9.20 

65.30 

144.60 

45.30 
108.80 
263.50 

.80 
1.10 


$ c. 
1,640.04 

225.73 
1,777.53 

481.59 
1,520.77 


$ c. 
9,348.56 
1,474.43 

11,935.20 
3,456.13 

11,234.51 

1,760.61 
2,255.57 
4,028.40 
41,809.96 
1,270.95 

9,694.54 
5,051.49 
3,192.36 
9,326.39 

7,385.85 

10,728.92 

48,242.31 

588.08 

4,562.28 

6,832.47 

3,656.44 

5,364.06 

15,165.76 

226.22 
182.64 


$ c 
9,696.34 
2,433.91 

14,426.72 
4,892.72 

17,479.05 

1,978.59 

2,375.79 

3,853.34 

45,832.51 

955.50 

6,438 80 

4,569.50 

4,493.30 

11,735.29 

11,065.10 

12,244.39 

55,586.62 

431.97 

3,916.50 

7,231.97 

4,074.75 

4,353.55 

11,855.23 

247.38 
183.77 


$ c. 

347.78 

959.48 

2,491.52 

1,436.59 

6,244.54 

217.98 
120.22 

4,022.55 


$ c. 


1920-21 


156 75 




1921-22 


1,259.02 
334 43 




1920-21 




1921-22 


1,056.09 
185.97 




1921-22 






198.12 


285.29 

637.62 

5,751.64 

219.96 




1921-22 


433.24 

4,410.39 

151.09 


175.06 


1920-21 
1920-21 


315.45 

3,255.74 
481.99 


1920-21 


1,341.62 
693.66 












297.50 
938.49 


451.71 
1,351.43 


1,300.94 
2,408.90 
3,679.25 

1,515.47 
7,344.31 


1920-21 
1921-22 


925.28 






1,174.14 


1,474.48 
7,198.23 




1920-21 


4,998.78 




1921-22 


80.40 


156.11 
645.78 




633.76 






639.89 


1,198.33 


399.50 

418.31 


1920-21 


530.55 






699.32 




1,010.51 
3,310.53 




2,138.79 








52 80 


29.81 
25.64 


21.16 
1.13 


1921-22 


40.67 




1921-22 








24,366.81 
744.49 


5,230.10 
143.50 


24,269 80 
1,072.06 


218,774.13 
7,767.69 


242,352.59 
7,104.25 


32,929.63 


9,351.17 
*663.44 


























25,111.30 


5,373.60 


25,341 86 


226,541.82 


249,456.84 





*Transferred to debit of Contingency Reserve. 



240 



FIFTEENTH ANNUAL REPORT OF THE 



No. 49 



EUGENIA SYSTEM 
Reserve for Contingencies Account, 31st October, 1922 

Total provision for Contingencies to 31st October, 1921 

Amount added on account of reduction in Cost of Power to Sundry Com- 
panies due to reduction in depreciation ra ¥ te from commencement of 
operations 

Deduct on account of adjustment re unused circuit on Durham — Mount 
Forest Line 

Balance brought forward 31st October, 1921 

Added during the year ending 31st October, 1922: 

Amounts charged to Municipalities as part of the Cost of Power 

delivered to them ; $5,230.10 

Provision against equipment employed in respect of contracts with 

Sundry Companies 143.50 

Interest at 4% per annum on monthly balances to the credit of the 

account 568.62 

Deduct: 

Expenditures during the year ending 31st October, 1922 $6,692.93 

Net loss for year on power sold to Sundry Power Customers 663.44 

Balance carried forward 31st October, 1922 



$12,079.58 

13,643 72 
$25,723.30 

11,507 77 
$14,215.53 



5,942.22 



20,157.75 



7,356.37 
$12,801.38 



1923 HYDRO-ELECTRIC POWER COMMISSION 241 



EUGENIA SYSTEM 

Reserve for Renewals Account, 31st October, 1922 

Total provision for Renewals to 31st October, 1921 $188,154.25 

Less reduction upon adjustment of Renewals Rate $68,106.98 

Less renewals provided for Durham — Mt. Forest Line 829.83 

68,936.81 

$119,217.44 
Deduct expenditures to 31st October, 1921 6,324.04 

Balance brought forward, 31st October, 1921 $112,893.40 

Added during the year ending 31st October, 1922: 

Amounts charged to Municipalities as part of the Cost of Power 

delivered to them $24,366 81 

Provision against equipment employed in respect of contracts with 

Sundry Companies .' 744.49 

Interest at 4% per annum on monthly balances to the credit of the 

account 4,515.74 

Renewals reserve provided on second-hand equipment purchased 349.60 

29,976.64 

$142,870.04 
Expenditures during the year ending 31st October, 1922 5,669.35 



Balance carried forward, 31st October, 1922 $137,200.69 



242 



FIFTEENTH ANNUAL REPORT OF THE 



No. 49 



EUGENIA 

Statement Showing the Total Sinking Fund Requirements to be Met by Each Muni- 
the Commission under Section 23 of the Act, Sinking Fund Payments made 

the Total of such Sinking Fund Payments including 



Municipality 



Total Sinking Fund requirements 

chargeable to the municipality 

under the Act 



(a) For period of 



(b) Amount 



Sinking Fund requirements the 

payment of which has been 

deferred 



(a) For period of 



(b) Amount 



Arthur 

Chatsworth . . 

Chesley 

Dundalk 

Durham 



Elmwood 

Flesherton 
Grand Valley . 

Hanover 

Holstein 



Kincardine . . . 
Lucknow. . . . 
Markdale .... 
Mount Forest 
Neustadt .... 



Orangeville 

Owen Sound . . 

Priceville 

Ripley 

Shelburne 



2y 

2 
2 
2 
2 

2 
2 
2 
2 



Tara 

Teeswater 

Wingham 

Flesherton .... 

Rural Power 

District 
Walkerton 

Quarry 

Rural Power 

District 



Totals — Municipalities 

Totals — Companies (from commencement 
of operation) 



s.ending31 Oct., 1922 

" " 1922 

" " 1922 

" " 1922 

" " 1922 

" " 1922 

" " 1922 

" " 1922 

" " 1922 

" 1922 

" 1922 

" 1922 

" " 1922 

" 1922 

" 1922 

" 1922 

" 1922 

" 1922 

" " 1922 

" 1922 

" " 1922 

" " 1922 

" 1922 

" 1922 



1922 



Grand Totals 



$ c. 
3,074.37 
433.69 
3,590.52 
1,049.10 
2,627.34 

646 82 

600.71 

1,261.48 

12,102.60 

437.53 

2,989.28 
1,653.71 
880.11 
2,844.46 
2,403.28 

3,165.24 

14,969.76 

183.51 

1,589.54 

2,119.77 

1,507.87 

1,659.58 

6,233.93 

29.81 



25.64 



1 yr. ending 31 Oct., 1922 



1 yr. ending 31 Oct., 1922 



2 yrs. ending 31 Oct.,1922 



1 yr. ending 31 Oct., 1922 
1 " " " 1922 
1 " " " 1922 



2 " 
2 " 
1 " 



" 1922 
" 1922 
" 1922 



2 yrs. ending 31 Oct., 1922 



1922 



2 yrs. ending 31 Oct., 1921 
2 " " « 1921 
1 " " " 1921 



1921 
1921 
1921 



68,079.65 
2,606.02 



70,685.67 



$ c. 
1,434.33 



1,812.99 



646.82 



623.86 
6,350.96 

217.57 

2,989.28 

1,653.71 

428.40 



2,403.28 
1,690.76 



183.51 

1,589.54 

921 .44 

1,507.87 
1,659.58 
6,233.93 



32,347.83 



32,347.83 



1923 



HYDRO-ELECTRIC POWER COMMISSION 



243 



SYSTEM 

cipality, Sinking Fund Requirements the Payment of which has been Deferred by 
by Certain Municipalities which have been Operating more than Five Years, and 
Interest allowed thereon to 31st October, 1922 



Sinking Fund requirements paid 
(or charged) as part of the cost of power 


Interest at 4% per 

annum allowed on 

Sinking Fund 

requirements which 

have been paid 


Total Sinking Fund 

payments and 

accumulated interest 

to the credit of the 

municipality on 

31st October, 1922 


(a) For period of 


(b) Amount 


1 year ending 31 Oct., 1921 

2 years ending " 1922 
1 " " " 1921 


$ c. 
1,640.04 
433.69 
1,777.53 
1,049.10 
2,627.34 


$ c. 


$ c. 

1,640.04 

442.01 

1,777.53 


8.32 


2 " " " 1922 
2 " " " 1922 


22.70 
44.26 


1,071 80 
2,671.60 


2 years ending " 1922 
1 " " " 1921 


600.71 

637.62 

5,751.64 

219.96 


12.62 


613.33 
637.62 


1 " " " 1921 




5,751.64 
219.96 


1 " " " 1921 


















1 year ending " 1921 

2 years ending " 1922 


451.71 
2,844.46 




451.71 


59.72 


2,904.18 


1 year ending " 1921 

2 " " " 1922 


1,474.48 
14,969.76 




1,474.48 
15,280.62 


310 86 










1 year ending " 1921 


1,198.33 




1,198.33 




















1 year ending " 1922 
1 " " « 1922 


29 81 
25.64 




29.81 




25.64 








operation) 


35,731 82 
2,606.02 


458.48 
61.36 


36,190.30 
2,667.38 




38,337 84 


519.84 


38,857.68 



244 



FIFTEENTH ANNUAL REPORT OF THE 



No. 49 



EUGENIA 

Statement Showing the Net Credit or Charge to each Municipality in respect of Power 

added during the Year — also the Net Amount Credited or Charged to each Muni 

the Accumulated Amount Standing as a Credit or Charge 



Municipality 



Date 
commenced 
operating 



Net Credit or Charge at 
31st October, 1921 



Credit 



Charge 



Amounts 
Credited 
upon adjust- 
ment of 
renewals 



Credited 



Arthur 

Chatsworth 

Chesley 

Dundalk 

Durham 

Elmwood 

Flesherton 

Grand Valley . . . 

Hanover 

Holstein 

Kincardine 

Lucknow 

Markdale 

Mount Forest. . . 
Neustadt 

Orangeville 

Owen Sound 

Priceville 

Ripley 

Shelburne 

Tara 

Teeswater 

Wingham 

Flesherton R.P.D 
Walkerton R.P.D 



Dec, 
Dec., 
July,. 
Dec, 
Dec, 

Apr., 
Dec, 
Dec, 
Sept., 
May, 

Mar., 

Jan., 

Mar., 

Dec, 

Dec, 

July, 

Dec, 

Mar., 

Jan., 

July, 

Feb., 
Dec, 
Dec, 



1916 
1915 
1916 
1915 
1915 

1918 
1915 
1916 
1916 
1916 

1921 
1921 
1916 
1915 
1918 

1916 
1915 
1921 
1921 
1916 

1918 
1920 
1920 



2,758.90 



2,758.90 



c 

9,515.86 
1,831.64 
6,654.73 
3,908.57 
1,502.80 

915.27 
2,943.43 
2,063. 



4,640.44 

3,855.59 

1,577.19 

627.69 

17,615.48 

2,098.61 

8,649.64 

16,210.28 

280.55 

1,814.45 

3,313.73 

6,063.87 
1,817.13 
5,576.72 



103,477.55 



Si c 

4,158.15 
544.02 
4,465.09 
1,272.55 
1,516.58 

643.89 

711.60 

1,509.61 

6,075.47 

926.49 

770.79 

470.95 

713.47 

5,428.01 

1,312.27 

3,578.09 

13,156.27 

48.64 

490.48 

2,292.66 

1,861.88 

428.92 

2,087.38 



54,463.26 



923 



HYDRO-ELECTRIC POWER COMMISSION 



245 



SYSTEM 

Supplied to it to 31st October, 1921, the Cash Receipts, Adjustments made and interest 
cipality in respect of Power Supplied in the Year Ending 31st October, 1922, and 
to each Municipality at 31st October, 1922 



Cash receipts and 
payments on account 
of such Credits and 
Charges, also adjust- 
ments made during 
the year 


Interest at 4% per 

annum added during 

the year 


Net amount Credited 

or Charged in respect 

of power supplied in 

the year ending 

31st October, 1922 


Accumulated amount 

standing as a 

Credit or Charge on 

31st October, 1922 


Credited 


Charged 


Credited 


Charged 


Credited 


Charged 


Credit 


Charge 


$ c. 


$ c. 


$ c. 


$ c. 

214.30 

32.52 

87.58 

57.11 


$ c. 
347.78 
959.48 
2,491.52 
1,436.59 
6,244.54 

217.98 
120.22 


$ c. 


$ c. 


$ c. 
5,224.23 


752.28 








391.62 

214.30 

743.46 

6,258.84 














2,000.00 














.52 










10.85 
81.24 




"64.25 


302.94 










1,889.91 


2,063.88 




38.87 
300.72 


175.06 


1,373.42 
10,398.74 






2,758.90 




4,022.55 






148.56 

123.39 

33.73 


315.45 

3,255.74 
481.99 


4,177.96 












6,463.93 


1,629.76 








7.80 
1,390.15 








3.43. 


1,300.94 
2,408.90 
3,679.25 

1,515.47 
7,344.31 




4,566.29 




324.22 
31.45 

202.86 

122.16 

4.23 

12.99 

38.10 

168.07 
29.04 
43.62 






5,536.50 










2,861.46 












3,758.94 










4,168.14 




252.44 






156.11 

645.78 


139.81 


1,814.45 










168.29 


150.68 






399.50 

418.31 




508.99 












■3 951.75 


1,817.13 






1,010.51 
3,310.53 




610.63 


5,576.72 










1,266.77 








21.16 
1.13 


21.16 
1.13 
























20,926.57 


2,758.90 


343.54 


1,766.02 


32,929.63 


9,351.17 


27,830.22 


33,761.96 



246 



FIFTEENTH ANNUAL REPORT OF THE 



No. 49 



EUGENIA SYSTEM 

Operating Account for Year 

Interest on Capital Investment $124 . 88 

Provision for Sinking Fund 39 . 68 



$164.56 



Statement Showing Interest and Sinking Fund Charges on each line for the Year 

Ending 31st October, 1922 





Capital Cost 


Interest 


Sinking Fund 


Total interest 

and sinking 

fund charges 


Revenue 
from 
municipalities 


Flesh erton . . . 


$ c. 

852.58 

1,241.33 

145.16 


$ c. 

52.86 

66.04 

5.98 


$ c 

15.36 

22.36 

1.96 


$ c 

68.22 

88.40 

7.94 


$ c. 
68.22 


Markdale 


88.40 


Ripley 


7.94 






Totals 


2,239.07 


124.88 


39.68 


164.56 


164.56 







WASDELLS 
Operating Account for Year 

Costs of Operation as Provided for Under Sections 6c and 23 of the Act. 

Costs of operating and maintaining the Generating Plant, Trans- 
mission Lines, Stations, etc., including the proportion of 
Administrative Expenses chargeable to the operation of this 

System. $17,351.47 

Interest on Capital Investment 13,485.31 

Provision for Renewal of Generating Plant, Lines and Stations, etc 4,933.65 

Provision for Contingencies: 

By charges against Municipalities # $374.00 

By charges against contracts with Private Company and 

Severn System which purchased power 581.70 

■ 955.70 

Provision for Sinking Fund: 

By charges against Municipalities $2,534.54 

By charges against contracts with Private Company and 

Severn System which purchased power. 2,986.59 

5,521.13 

$42,247,26 



1923 



HYDRO-ELECTRIC POWER COMMISSION 



247 



RURAL LINES 

Ending 31st October, 1922 

Revenue: 
Interest and Sinking Fund collected from the Municipalities which operate lines. $164.56 



$164.56 



Statement Showing the total Sinking Fund Requirements of each Municipality, and 
the total of the Sinking Fund Payments with Interest allowed thereon to 

31st October, 1922 





Sinking Fund requirements 


Interest at 4% per 

annum allowed on 

Sinking Fund 

payments 


Total Sinking Fund 
payments and 




Period covered 


Amount 


accumulated interest 
to 31st October, 1922 


Flesherton .... 

Markdale 

Ripley 


5 years ending 31 Oct., 1922 

6 " " " 1922 
% " " " 1922 


$ c. • 
55.00 
127.43 
1.96 


$ c. 
1.59 
4.20 


$ c. 

56.59 

131.63 

1.96 






Totals 


184.39 


5.79 


190.18 









SYSTEM 

Ending 31st October, 1922 

Revenue for Period 

Collected from Municipalities 

Power sold to Private Company and to Severn System 

Add: Amounts due by certain Municipalities, being the differ- 
ence between the sums paid and the cost of power supplied 

to them in the period $61.51 

Deduct: Amounts collected by certain Municipalities in excess of 
the sums required to be paid by them for power supplied 
in the period 5,768.27 

Revenue 

Loss on Sale of Power supplied to Private Company (written off to Contingency 
Reserve) 



$26,707.82 
20,827.97 



$47,535.79 



5,706.76 



$41,829.03 



418.23 



$42,247.26 



248 



FIFTEENTH ANNUAL REPORT OF THE 



No. 49 



WASDELLS 

Statement Showing the Amount to be Paid by Each Municipality as the Cost — Under 

Received by the Commission from Each Municipality on Account of such Cost, 

upon Ascertainment (by Annual Adjustment) of the Actual Cost of 









Share of 
Capital Cost 
of system on 

which 
interest and 

fixed 

charges are 

payable 


Average 
Horse- 
power 
supplied in 
year after 
correction 
for power 
factor 


Share of Operating 


Municipality 


Interim Rates per 

Horsepower collected 

by Commission 

during year 


Operating 
Main- 
tenance 

and 
Adminis- 
trative 
Expenses 


Interest 




To 

Dec. 21, 

1921 


To 

Oct. 31, 

1922 




Beaverton 

Brechin 


$ c. 
60.00 
90.00 
65.00 
60.00 

"85!6o 
80 ' 00 


$ c. 
65.00 

'90.00 
65.00 
60.00 

90.00 
85.00 
90.00 
80.00 


$ c 
34,437.46 
22,406.29 
28,284.17 
13,242.96 

26,693.35 
26,292.70 
31,620.99 
29,502.05 


112.2 
35.4 
77.5 
26.6 

6.7 
47.1 

7.4 
61.1 


$ c. 
2,633.86 

978.26 
1,659.36 

524.56 

409.78 
1,044.19 

401.42 
1,313.73 


$ c. 

1,406.80 

917.03 


Cannington 

Kirkfield 


1,156.11 
541 . 74 


Port Perry 

Sunderland 

Uxbridge 


171.26 

1,086.40 

196.43 


Woodville 


1,206.77 


Totals — Municipalit 
Totals — Companies 






ies 


212,479.97 
166,571.39 


374. 

581.7 


8,965.16 
8,386.31 


6,682.54 


and Severn System .... 


6,802.77 


Grand Totals 


379,051.36 


955.7 


17,351.47 


13,485.31 







WASDELLS SYSTEM 
Reserve for Contingencies Account, 31st October, 1922 

Balance brought forward 31st October, 1921 

Amount added on account of reduction in Cost of Power to Sundry Com- 
panies, due to reduction in depreciation rate from commencement of 
operations 

Added during the year ending 31st October, 1922 : 

Amounts charged to Municipalities as part of the Cost of Power de- 
livered to them . $374.00 

Provision against equipment employed in respect of contracts with 

Sundry Companies 581 . 70 

Interest at 4% per annum on monthly balances to the credit of the 

account 212.72 

Deduct: 

Loss for the year on power sold to Private Company 

Balance carried forward, 31st October, 1922 



$240.64 
5,077.30 



1,168.42 

$6,486.36 

418.23 

$6,068.13 



1923 



HYDRO-ELECTRIC POWER COMMISSION 



249 



SYSTEM 

Section 23 of the Act — of Power Supplied to it by the Commission. The Amount 
— and the Amount Remaining to be Credited or Charged to Each Municipality 
Power Supplied to it in the Year Ending 31st October, 1922 



Costs and Fixed Charges 


Total Cost 

of Power 

for year as 

provided to 

be paid 

under 

section 23 

of Act 


Amounts 
paid to the 
Com- 
mission 
by each 
munici- 
pality 


Amounts remaining to 
to be credited or charg- 
ed to each municipality 
upon ascertainment of 
the actual Cost of 
Power by annual 
adjustment 


Sinking Fund 

for the years 

mentioned 

hereunder 

charged as 

part of the 

Cost of Power 

in the year 

1921-1922 


Renew- 
als 


Contin- 
gencies 


Sinking 
Fund 




Credited 


Charged 


$ c. 
514.68 
335.50 
422.97 
198.19 

62.66 
397.46 

71.86 
441 . 50 


$ c. 

112.20 
35.40 
77.50 
26.60 

6.70 
47.10 

7.40 
61.10 


$ c. 
617.61 
402.60 
507.57 

476] 96 
529] 80 


$ c. 
5,285.15 
2,668.79 
3,823.51 
1,291.09 

650.40 
3,052.11 

677.11 
3,552.90 


$ c. 

7,076.31 

3,191.46 

. 5,039.10 

1,597.00 

603.00 
4,005.95 

663.00 
4,532.00 


$ c. 
1,791.16 

522.67 
1,215.59 

305.91 

"953 .'84 
"979 .'l0 


$ c. 
47.40 

"ii.'ii 


1921-22 
1921-22 
1921-22 

192i-22 

192i-22 


2,444.82 
2,488.83 


374.00 
581.70 


2,534.54 
2,986.59 


21,001.06 
21,246.20 


26,707.82 
20,827.97 


5,768.27 


61.51 
418.23 


* 


4,933 . 65 


955.70 


5,521.13 


42,247.26 


47,535.79 









Transferred to Debit of Contingency Reserve. 



WASDELLS SYSTEM 

Reserve for Renewals Account, 31st October, 1922 

Total provision for renewals to 31st October, 1921 $42,116.91 

Less reduction upon adjustment of Renewal Rates 10,578.06 

$31,538.85 
Deduct: 

Expenditures to 31st October, 1921 3,143 . 18 

Balance brought forward, 31st October, 1921 

Added during the year ending 31st October, 1922: 

Amounts charged to Municipalities as part of the Cost of Power 

delivered to them $2,444 . 82 

Provision against equipment employed in respect of contracts with 

Sundry Companies 2,488 . 83 

Interest at 4% per annum on monthly balances to the credit of the 

account 1 , 135 . 83 

Renewals reserve provided on second-hand equipment purchased 1,296 . 53 

Expenditures during the year ending October 31, 1922 

Balance carried forward, 31st October, 1922 



$28,395.67 



7,366.01 

$35,761.68 
197.56 

$35,564.12 



250 



FIFTEENTH ANNUAL. REPORT OF THE 



No. 49 



WASDELLS 

Statement Showing the Total Sinking Fund Requirements to be Met by Each Muni 
Commission under Section 23 of the Act. — Sinking Fund Payments made 

the Total of such Sinking Fund Payments, 



Municipality 


Total Sinking Fund requirements 

chargeable to the municipality 

under the Act 


Sinking Fund requirements the 

payment of which has been 

deferred 




(a) For period of 


(b) Amount 


(a) For period of 


(b) Amount 


Beaverton 


3 yrs. ending 31 Oct. 1922 
3 " " " 1922 
3 " " " 1922 
3 " " " 1922 

1 " " " 1922 
3 " " " 1922 
1 " " " 1922 
3 " " " 1922 


$ c. 
1,845.03 
1,243.36 
1,604.10 

429.05 

75.19 
1,499.41 

86.23 
1,528.66 




$ c. 


Brechin 






Cannington 






Kirkfield 

Port Perry 

Sunderland 


3 yrs. ending 31 Oct. 1922 
1 " " " 1922 


429.05 
75.19 


Uxbridge 

Woodville 


1 yr. ending 31 Oct. 1922 


86.23 








Totals — M unicip 

Totals — Compan 

of operations) 

Grand Total 


alities 


8,311.03 
8,758.2.2 


590.47 


les (from commencement 




s 




17,069.25 


590.47 







WASDELLS 

Statement Showing the Net Charge to Each Municipality in Respect of Power Supplied 
During the Year. Also the Net Amount Credited or Charged to each Muni 

and the Accumulated Amount Standing 



Municipality 


Date 
commenced 
operating 


Net Charge at 
31st October, 1921 


Amounts Credited 
upon adjustments of 
renewals reserve 

Credited 


Cash Receipts on 

account of such charges 

during the year 




Credited 


Beaverton .... 

Brechin 

Cannington . . . 
Kirkfield 

Port Perry . . . 


Nov., 1914 
Jan., 1915 
Nov., 1914 
June, 1920 

Sept., 1922 
Nov., 1914 
Sept., 1922 
Nov., 1914 


$ c. 
4,751.99 
3,680.19 
3,645.65 

307.02 


$ c. 
1,238.52 

804.56 

1,318.20 

53.65 

'*992!64 
1,093. i9 


$ c. 
3,500.00 


Sunderland . . . 
Uxbridge 


3,587.46 




Woodville .... 


3,145.08 




Totals 


19,117.39 


5,500.76 


3,500.00 









1923 



HYDRO-ELECTRIC POWER COMMISSION 



251 



SYSTEM 

cipality, Sinking Fund Requirements, the Payment of which has been Deferred by the 
by Certain Municipalities which have been Operating more than Five Years, and 
including Interest allowed thereon, to 31st October, 1922. 



Sinking Fund requirements paid 
(or charged) as part of the cost of power 



(a) For period of 



(b) Amount 



Interest at 4% per 

annum allowed 

on Sinking Fund 

requirements which 
have been paid 



Total Sinking Fund 

payments and 

accumulated Interest 

to the credit of the 

municipality on 
31st October, 1922 



3 years ending 31 Oct., 1922, 
3 " " " 1922 

3 " " " 1922 



$ c. 
1,845.03 
1,243.36 
1,604.10 



$ c. 
75.60 
51.05 
68.75 



9 c. 
1,920.63 
1,294.41 
1,672.85 



3 years endng 31 Oct., 1922 
3 years ending 31 Oct., 1922 



1,499.41 



62.50 
60.04' 



1,561.91 
1,588.70 



1,528.66 



(From commencement of operations) 



7,720.56 
8,758.22 



317.94 
340.70 



16,478.78 



658.64 



8,038.50 
9,098.92 



17,137.42 



SYSTEM 

to it to 31st October, 1921, the Gash Receipts, Adjustments made and Interest Added 
cipality in Respect of Power Supplied in the Year ending 31st October, 1922, 
as a Credit or Charge to Each Municipality at 31st October, 1922. 



Interest at 4% 

per annum added 

during the year 


Net amount Credited or Charged 

in respect of power supplied in 

the year ending 31st October, 1922 


Accumulated amount standing as 

a Credit or Charge on 

31st October, 1922 


Charged 


Credited 


Charged 


Credited 


Charged 


$ c. 
137.85 


$ c. 
1,791.16 

522.67 
1,215.59 

305.91 

"953i84 
979^10 


$ c. 
47.40 


$ c. 
1,639.84 

"42i41 


$ c. 


115.03 
93.10 
10.13 

103] 80 
'82*07 


2,467.99 
1,204.96 

47.40 
1,744.78 

14.11 
1,154.86 


541.98 


5,768.27 


61.51 


1,682.25 


6,634.10 



252 



FIFTEENTH ANNUAL REPORT OF THE 



No. 49 



Interest on Capital Investment 
Provision for Sinking Fund .... 



WASDELLS SYSTEM 

Operating 

For Year Ending 



$837.52 
249.38 



$1,086.90 



Statement showing Interest and 
For the year ending 





Capital Cost 


Interest 


Beaverton 


$ c. 
6,139.22 
613.25 
3,903.91 
1,403.95 
2,895.62 


$ c 
356.38 


Brechin 


38.02 


Brock Twp. (operated by Sunderland) . . 
Cannington 


230.77 
38.61 


Woodville 


173.74 








14,955.95 


837.52 



Statement sho ving the Total Sinking Fund 
and the Total of the Sinking Fund 

thereon to 



Beaverton 

Brechin 

Brock Township (operated by 

Sunderland) 

Cannington 

Woodville 



Sinking Fund requirements 



Period covered 



5 vears ending 31st October, 1922 

4 " " " 1922 

4 " " " 1922 

i/ ? , " " " 1922 

3 " " " 1922 



Amount 


$ 


c. 


394 


59 


56 


22 


269 


52 


12 


63 


127 


85 



860.81 



MUSKOKA 
Operating Account for year 

Costs of Operating as provided for under Sections 6c and 23 of the Act 

Cost of operating and maintaining the Generating Plant, Transmission Lines, Stations, 
etc., including the proportion of Administrative Expenses chargeable to the 
operation of this System $12,464 . 62 

Interest on Capital Investment 9,447 . 88 

Provision for Renewal of Generating Plant, Lines, Stations, etc 2,659 . 87 

Provision for Contingencies: 

By charges against Municipalities $1,342.60 

By appropriating the net profits on power sold to Sundry Customers 

at Muskoka Falls 29.71 

1,372.31 

Provision for Sinking Fund : 

By charges against Municipalities $3,738.28 

By charges against contracts with Sundry Customers at Muskoka 

Falls 5,13 

3,743.41 

$29,688.09 



923 



HYDRO-ELECTRIC POWER -COMMISSION 



253 



RURAL LINES 

Account 

31st October, 1922 

Revenue: 

Interest and Sinking Fund from the Municipalities which operate the line 



$1,086.90 
$1,086.90 



Sinking Fund Charges on each Line 
31st October, 1922 



Sinking Fund 


Total Interest and 
Sinking Fund Charges 


Revenue from 
municipalities 


$ c. 

103.85 
11.04 
69.74 
12.63 
52.12 


$ c. 
460.23 

49.06 
300.51 

51.24 
225.86 


$ c. 
460.23 

49.06 
300.51 

51.24 
225.86 


249.38 


1,086.90 


1,086.90 



requirements in respect of each Line 
Payments with Interest allowed 
31st October, 1922 



Sinking Fund paid 


Interest at 4% per annum 
allowed on Sinking Fund 
payments 


Total Sinking Fund payments 

and accumulated interest to 

31st October, 1922 


$ c. 

394.59 

56.22 

269.52 
12.63 

127.85 


$ c. 

11.63 

1.81 

7.99 

"3!03 


$ c. 

406.22 

58.03 

277.51 

12.63 

130.88 


860.81 


24.46 


885.27 





SYSTEM 

ending 31st October, 1922 

Revenue for Period 

Collected from Municipalities : $31,465.72 

Power sold to Sundry Customers at Muskoka Falls $51 . 00 

$31,516.72 
Deduct amounts collected from Municipalities in excess of the sums required to be 

paid by them for power supplied in the period '. 1,828 . 63 



Revenue $29,688.09 

$29,688.09 



254 



FIFTEENTH ANNUAL REPORT OF THE 



No. 49 






MUSKOKA 

Statement Showing the Amount to be Paid by Each Municipality as the Cost — 

Received by the Commission from Each Municipality on Account of such 

Ascertainment (by Annual Adjustment) of the Actual Cost 





Interim Rates per 
Horsepower collected 


Share of 
Capital Cost 
of system on 

which 
interest and 

fixed 

charges are 

payable 


Average 
Horse- 
power 
supplied in 
year after 
correction 
for power 
factor 


Share of Operating 


Municipality 


by Commission 
during year 


Operating 
Main- 
tenance 

and 
Adminis- 
trative 
Expenses 






To 

Dec. 31, 

1921 


To 

Oct. 31, 

1922 


Interest 


Gravenhurst 


$ c. 
15.00 

25.00 


$ c. 
20.00 

25.00 


$ c. 
37,135.97 

175,370.84 


361.9 
980.7 


$ c. 
3,231.26 

9,233.36 


$ c. 
1,648.83 

7,786 44 


Huntsville 






Totals — Municipalitier 

Muskoka Falls — 
(Sundry Customers) 






212,506.81 
284.01 


1,342.6 


12,464.62 


9,435.27 
12 61 
















Grand Totals .... 






212,790.82 


1,342.6 


12,464.62 


9,447.88 









MUSKOKA SYSTEM 

Reserve for Contingencies Account, 31st October, 1922 

Balance brought forward, 31st October, 1921 $1,911.14 

Amount added on account of reduction in Cost of Power to Sundry Companies due 

to reduction in depreciation rate from commencement of operations 15.07 

Added during the year ending 31st October, 1922: 

Amounts charged to Municipalities as part of the Cost of Power 

delivered to them $1,342.60 

Net profits from contracts with Sundry Power Customers 29.71 

Interest at 4% psr annum on monthly balances at the credit of 

the account 77.05 

$1,449.36 

Balance carried forward, 31st October, 1922 $3,375.57 



1923 



HYDRO-ELECTRIC POWER COMMISSION 



255 



SYSTEM 

under Section 23 of the Act — of Power supplied to it by the Commission, the amount 
Cost, and the Amount Credited or Charged to Each Municipality upon 
of Power supplied to it in the Year Ending 31st October, 1922 



Cost and Fixed Charges. 


Total Cost 

of Power 

for year as 

provided to 

be paid 

under 

section 23 

of Act 


Amounts 
paid to the 
Com- 
mission 
by each 
munici- 
pality 


Amounts remaining to 
be credited or charged 


Sinking Fund 
for the years 


Renewals 


Contin- 
gencies 


Sinking 
Fund 


to each municipality 

upon ascertainment of 

the actual cost of 

power by annual 

adjustment 


mentioned 
hereunder 
charged as 
part of the 
cost of power 
in the year 




Credited 


Charged 


1921-22 


$ c. 
464.20 


$ c. 
361.90 

980.70 


$ c. 
668.44 

3,069.84 


$ c. 
6,374.63 

23,262.46 


$ c. 
6,949.31 

24,516.41 


$ c. 
574.68 

1 253.95 


$ c. 


1921-22 


2,192.12 




1920-^1 








2,656.32 


1,342.60 


3,738.28 
5.13 


29,637.09 
21.29 


31,465.72 
51.00 


1,828.63 
29.71 






3.55 


* 


1921-22 


2,659.87 


1,342.60 


3,743.41 


29,658.38 


31,516.72 

















Transferred to Credit of Contingency Reserve. 



MUSKOKA SYSTEM 

Reserve for Renewals Account, 31st October, 1922 

Total provision for Renewals to 31st October, 1921 $26,651.51 

Less reduction upon adjustment of Renewal Rates 13,398.99 

• $13,252.52 

Deduct expenditures to 31st October, 1921 1,180.12 

Balance brought forward, 31st October, 1921 $12,072.40 

Added during the year ending 31st October, 1922: 

Amount charged to Municipalities as part of the Cost of Power 

delivered to them $2,656.32 

Provision against equipment employed in respect of contracts with 

Sundry Companies 3.55 

Interest at 4% per annum on monthly balances to the credit of the 

account 482.90 

3,142.77 

Balance carried forward, 13st October, 1922 $15,215.17 



256 



FIFTEENTH ANNUAL REPORT OF THE 



No. 49 



MUSKOKA 

Statement showing the Total Sinking Fund Requirements to be met by each Munici 

Commission under Section 23 of the Act — Sinking Fund Payments Made by 

the Total of such Sinking Fund Payments, including 



Municipality 


Total Sinking Fund requirements 
chargeable to the municipality 
under the Act 


Sinking Fund 

the payment 

has been 




(a) For period of 


(b) Amount 


(a) For period of 


Gravenhurst 


2 years ending 31 Oct., 1922 
2 " 


$ c 
1,419.04 

6,226.49 




Huntsville 


1 year ending 31 Oct., 1922 




Totals, Municipali 

Totals — Companies 
(From commence 


ties 


7,645.53 
5.13 




ment of operations) 




Grand Totals 


7,650.66 









MUSKOKA 

Statement Showing the Net Credit or Charge to each Municipality in Respect of 

Made and Interest added during the Year — also the Net Amount Credited 

October, 1922 — and the Accumulated Amount Standing as a 



Municipality 


Date 

commenced 

operating 


Net Credit or 

Charge at 31st October, 

1921 


Amounts 
Credited 
upon adjust- 
ment of 
renewals 
reserve 


Cash payments 
and adjustments 

on account of 
such Credits and 
Charges during the 
year 




Credit 


Charge 


Credited 


Charged 


Gravenhurst 


Nov. 1915 
Sept. 1916 


$ c. 


$ c. 
6,272.07 


$ c. 
2,694.62 

10,689.30 


$ c 
638.29 


Huntsville 


1,290.35 


2,152.06 








Totals 


1,290.35 


6,272.07 


13,383.92 


2,790.35 



1923 



HYDRO-ELECTRIC POWER COMMISSION 



257 



SYSTEM 

pality — Sinking Fund Requirements the Payment of which has been Deferred by the 
Certain Municipalities Which Have Been Operating more than Five Years — And 
Interest Allowed Thereon to 31st October, 1922. 



requirements 
of which 
deferred 


Sinking Fund requirements 

paid (or charged) as part 

of the cost of power 


Interest at 
4% per annum 

allowed on 

Sinking Fund 

requirements 

which have 

been paid 


Total Sinking 
Fund 
payments 
to the credit of 
the munici- 
pality on 31st 
October, 1921 


(b) Amount 


(a) For period of 


(b) Amount 


$ c. 
30.02 




$ c. 


2 years ending 31 Oct., 1922 
1 " " " 1921 

(From commencement of 
operations) 


$ c. 
1,419.04 

3,069.84 


$ c. 
1,449.06 


3,156.65 


3,069.84 








3,156.65 


4,488.88 
5.13 


30.02 


4,518.90 
5.13 










3,156.65 


4,494.01 


30.02 


4,524.03 



SYSTEM 

Power supplied to it at 31st October, 1921 — The Gash Payments — Adjustments 
to each Municipality in Respect of Power Supplied in the Year Ending 31st 
Credit or Charge to each Municipality at 31st October, 1922. » 



Interest at 4% per 

annum added 

during the year 


Net amount credit- 
ed in respect of 
power supplied in 
the year ending 31st 
October, 1922 


Accumulated amount 

standing as a Credit or 

Charge on 31st October, 1922 


Credited 


Charged 


Credited 


Credit 


Charge 


$ c 


$ c. 
143.09 


$ c. 
574.68 

1,253.95 


$ c. 


$ c. 
3,784.15 


453.02 


11,534.56 










453.02 


143.09 


1,828.63 


11,534.56 


3,784.15 



9H.C. 



258 



FIFTEENTH ANNUAL REPORT OF THE 



No. 49 



ST. LAWRENCE 
Operating Account for Year 

Costs of Operation as Provided for under Sections 6c and 23 of the Act. 

Power Purchased .•••;•. •. $56,931.81 

Costs of operating and maintaining the Generating Plant, Transmission Lines, 
Stations, etc., including the proportion of Administrative Expenses chargeable 

to the operation of this System 23,688.52 

Interest on Capital Investment 40,618.46 

Provision for Renewal of Lines, Stations, etc 16,951.72 

Provision for Contingencies: 

By charges against Municipalities $1,924.00 

By charges against contracts with Private Companies 1,792.50 

3,716.50 

Provision for Sinking Fund: 

By charges against Municipalities $8,222.15 

By charges against contracts with Private Companies which 

purchased power 3,447.44 



11,669.59 



$153,576.60 



ST. LAWRENCE 

Statement Showing the Amount to be Paid by Each Municipality as the Cost — Under 

Received by the Commission from Each Municipality on Account of Such Cost 

upon ascertainment (by Annual Adjustment) of the Actual 



Municipality 



Interim Rates per 

Horsepower collected 

by Commission 

during year 



Toi 

Dec. 31, 

1921 



To 

Oct. 31, 

1922 



Share of 
Capital Cost 
of system on 

which 
interest and 

fixed 

charges are 

payable 



Average 
Horse- 
power 
supplied in 
year after 
correction 
for power 
factor 



Cost of 
Power to 
Com- 
mission 



Share of Operating 



Operating 
Main- 
tenance 

and 
Adminis- 
trative 
Expenses 



Interest 



Alexandria. 
Apple Hill.. 
Brockville . . 
Chesterville 
Lancaster. . 

Martintown 
Maxville . . . 
Prescott. . . 
Williamsburg 
Winchester. . 



$ c. 
65.00 
60.00 
55.00 
85.00 
97.00 

54.00 
86.00 
55.00 
73.00 
85.00 



$ c. 
80.00 
85.00 
55.00 
85.00 
97.00 

85.00 
86.00 
52.00 
95.00 
85.00 



Brockville Rural Power Districts . . 
Chesterville Rural Power Districts 
Martintown Rural Power Districts 
Prescott Rural Power Districts. . . 

Totals — Municipalities 

Totals — Companies 

Now Operating Capital 

Grand Totals 



$ c. 

115,671.74 
11,254.04 

288,408.66 
68,995.70 
37,607.89 

6,374.86 
41,399.16 
59,946.22 

8,156.48 
34,960.72 

19,166.42 
4,309.12 
9,048.48 

16,199.02 



721,498.41 

241,784.98 

71,978.69 



154.9 

19.4 

1,153.6 

143.8 
21.1 

11.9 
38.4 
227.8 
17.8 
87.9 

36. 

2.7 
5.5 
3.2 



1,924. 
1,792.5 



$ c 
2,372.86 

297.18 

17,671.62 

2,202.82 

323.22 

182.29 
588.24 

3,489.59 
272.67 

1,346.51 

551.48 
41.36 

84.25 
49.02 



$ c 
2,758.89 

388.07 
7,723.08 
1,496.27 

969.12 

184.27 
815.46 
2,109.57 
307. 
901. 



539.87 
325.13 
282.68 
376.71 



$ c. 
5,452.41 

527.18 

12,419.50 

2,994.12 

1,818.92 

297.43 

1,982.45 

2,325.97 

347.53 

1,455.12 

777.78 
137.91 
408.08 
270.19 



29,473.11 

27,458.71 



19,178.46 
4,510.06 



31,214.59 
9,403.87 



1,035,262.08 



3,716.5 



56,931.82 



23,688.52 



40,618.46 






1923 



HYDRO-ELECTRIC POWER COMMISSION 



259 



SYSTEM 

Ending 31st October, 1922 

Revenue for Period 

Collected from Municipalities $121,488.45 

Power sold to Private Companies 48,620.11 

$170,108.56 
Add amounts due by certain Municipalities, being the difference 
between sums paid and the Costs of Power supplied to them 

in the year .•;•••.•'. $4,671.37 

Deduct amounts collected from certain Municipalities in excess 
of the sums required to be paid by them for power supplied 

in the year 23,026.25 

18,354.88 

Revenue $151,753.68 

Loss on Sale of Power supplied to Private Companies (written off against Con- 
tingency Reserve) 1,822.93 

$153,576.61 



SYSTEM 



Section 23 of the Act — of Power Supplied to it by the Commission — The Amount 
and the Amount remaining to be Credited or Charged to Each Municipality 
Cost of Power Supplied to it in the Year Ending 31st October, 1922 



Costs and Fixed Charges 


Total Cost 

of Power 

for year as 

provided to 

be paid 

under 

section 23 

of Act 


Amounts 
paid to the 
Com- 
mission 
by each 
munici- 
pality 


Amounts remaining to 

be credited or charged 

to each municipality 

upon ascertainment of 

the actual Cost of 

Power by annual 

adjustment 


Sinking Fund 
for the years 
mentioned 
hereunder 
charged as^ 
part of the- 
Cost of Power 
in the year 


Renewals 


Contin- 
gencies 


Sinking 
Fund 




Credited 


Charged 


1921-22 


$ c. 
2,220.94 


$ c. 

154.90 

19.40 

1,153.60 

143.80 

21.10 

11.90 
38.40 
227.80 
17.80 
87.90 

36.00 
2.70 
5.50 
3.20 


$ c. 

5,052 '.58 
1,097.65 

"852. '70 
101.43 
533.45 

285.13 
50.56 

149 .60 
99.05 


$ c 

12,960.00 

1,446.57 

49,079.23 

9,154.26 

3,873.28 

797.05 
4,232.07 
9,953.08 
1,188.57 
4,917.46 

2,664.66 

647.11 

1,215.25 

1,004.98 


$ c 
12,056.79 

1,458.70 
63,456.27 
12,227.27 

2,041.80 

948.19 

3,301.67 

11,983.27 

884.29 

7,467.22 

3,443.02 
523.27 
637.09 

1,059.60 


$ c. 


$ c. 
903.21 




214.74 


12.13 

14,377.04 

3,073.01 




5,058.85 




1921 


1,219.60 




1922 


740.92 


1,831.48 




121.16 


151.14 




807.52 


930.40 




947.45 


2,030.19 


1922 


141.56 


304.28 


1921 


592.72 


2,549.76 
778.36 


1922 


474.40 




1922 


89.45 


123.84 
578.16 


1922 


285.14 




1922 


206.81 


54.62 


1922 








13,121.26 
3,830.46 


1,924.00 
1,792.50 


8,222.15 
3,447.44 


103,133.57 
50,443.04 


121,488.45 
48,620.11 


23,026.25 


4,671.37 
1,822.93 


* ' ' 

























16,951.72 


3,716.50 


11,669.59 


153,576.61 


170,108.56 

















Note. — Transferred to Debit of Contingency Reserve. 



260 



FIFTEENTH ANNUAL REPORT OF THE 



No. 49 



ST. LAWRENCE SYSTEM 

Reserve For Gontingencies Account, 31st October, 1922 

Balance brought forward, 31st October, 1921 

Amount added on account of reduction in Cost of Power to Sundry Companies 

due to reduction in depreciation rate from commencement of operations 

Added during the year ending 31st October, 1922: 

Amounts charged to Municipalities as part of the Cost of 

Power delivered to them $1,924.00 

Provision against equipment employed in respect of con- 
tracts with Sundry Companies, $1,792.50 and $500.00.. . . 2,292.50 
Interest at 4% per annum on monthly balances to the credit 

of the account 248.18 



$3,372.65 
2,831.77 



4,464.68 



$10,669.10 



Deduct: 

Expenditures during the year ending, 31st October, 1922. . . . 
Net loss for year on power sold to Sundry Power Customers . 



Balance carried forward, 31st October, 1922 



$2,591.00 
1.822.93 



4,413.93 



$6,255.17 



ST. LAWRENCE 

Statement Showing the Total Sinking Fund Requirements to be met by Each Munici- 

Commission Under Section 23 of the Act — Sinking Fund Payments Made by 

and the Total of such Sinking Fund Payments Including Interest 



Municipality 


Total Sinking Fund requirements 

chargeable to the municipality 

under the Act 


Sinking Fund requirements the 
payment of which has been 
deferred 




(a) For period of 


(b)Amount 


(a) For period of 


(b) Amount 


Alexandria 

Apple Hill 

Brockville .... 
Chesterville. 


2 years ending 31 Oct. 1922 

2 " " " 1922 

3 " " " 1922 
3 " " " 1922 
2 " " " 1922 

2 " " " 1922 

2 " " " 1922 

3 " " " 1922 
3 " " " 1922 
3 " " " 1922 

1 '{ " " 1922 
1 " " " 1922 
1 " " " 1922 
1 " " " 1922 


$ c. 
3,258.46 

255.94 

14,575.74 

3,554.01 

969.17 

143.64 
1,157.47 
2,731.71 

310.32 
1,678.78 

475.69 
55.11 

149.60 
99.05 


2 years ending 31 Oct. 1922 
2 " " " 1922 
1 " " " 1922 


$ c. 
3,258.46 

255.94 
4,552.98 


Lancaster 

Martintown 

Maxville 


2 " " " 1922 

2 " " " 1922 
2 " " " 1922 


969.17 

143.64 
1,157.47 


Williamsburg. . . 


1 year ending 3 1 Oct. 1922 


127.40 


Brockville, Rural 






Chesterville, 






Martintown, 






Prescott, Rural 












Total — Municipa 

Totals — Compan 

of operations). 

Grant Totals.. 


lities. . .... 


29,414.69 
7,926.98 


10,465.06 


ies (From commencement 












37,341.67 


10,465.06 







1923 HYDRO-ELECTRIC POWER COMMISSION 261 

ST. LAWRENCE SYSTEM 

Reserve For Renewals Account, 31st October, 1922 

Total provision for Renewals to 31st October, 1921 $79,062.01 

Transferred from Rural Power District balance, 31st October, 1921. . 10.12 

$79,072.13 

Less reduction upon adjustment of Renewal Rates 25,398.57 

$53,673.56 

Deduct expenditures to 31st October, 1921 2,702.64 

Balance brought forward, 31st October, 1921 $50,970.92 

Added during the year ending 31st October, 1922: 

Amounts charged to Municipalities as part of the Cost of Power 

delivered to them $13,121.26 

Provision against equipment employed in respect of con- 
tracts with Sundry Companies 3,830.46 

Interest at 4% per annum on monthly balances to the credit 

of the account 2,038.83 

18,990.55 

$69,961.47 
Expenditures during the year ending 31st October, 1922 5,217.69 

Balance carried forward, 31st October, 1922 $64,743.78 



SYSTEM 

pality — Sinking Fund Requirements, the Payment of which has been Deferred by the 
Certain Municipalities Which Have Been Operating More Than Five Years — 
Allowed Thereon to 31st October, 1922 



Sinking Fund requirements paid 
(or Charged) as part of the Cost of Power 


Interest at 4% per 

annum allowed 

on Sinking Fund 

requirements which 

have been paid 


Total Sinking Fund 
payments and 

accumulated interest 

to the credit of the 
municipality 

31st October, 1922 


(a) For period of 


(b) Amount 




$ c. 


$ c. 


$ c. 










2 years ending 31 Oct., 1921 

3 " " " 1922 


10,022.76 
3,554.01 


198.81 
149.50 


10,221.57 
3,703.51 


















3 years ending 31 Oct., 1922 

2 " " " 1921 

3 " " " 1922 

1 " " " 1922 

1 " " " 1922 

1 " " " 1922 


2,731.71 

182.92 

1,678.78 

475.69 

55.11 

149.60 

99.05 


113.85 

,, 326 

• -69.14 

7.62 

.18 


2,845.56 

186.18 

1,747.92 

483.31 

55.29 

149.60 


1 " " " 1922 




99.05 










18,949.63 
7,926.98 


542.36 
258.93 


19,491.99 
8,185.91 


(From commencement of operations 




26,876.61 


801.29 


27,677.90 



262 



FIFTEENTH ANNUAL REPORT OF THE 



No. 49 



ST. LAWRENCE 

Statement Showing the Net Credit or Charge to Each Municipality in Respect of Power 
Added During the Year — also the Net Amount Credited or Charged to each 

and the Accumulated Amount Standing as a 



Municipality 


Date 
com- 
menced 
operating 


Net Charge 

at 31st 

October, 

1921 


Amounts 
Credited upon 
adjust- 
ments of 
renewals 
reserve 




Credited 


Alexandria 


Jan., 1921 
April, 1921 
April, 1915 
April, 1914 
May, 1921 

May, 1921 
Feb., 1921 
Dec, 1913 
April, 1915 
Jan., 1914 


$ c. 
3,490.01 
398.46 
4,052.08 
4,618.29 
1,464.63 

295.91 

1,778.83 

565.73 

566.13 

1,405.67 


$ c. 
699.78 


Apple Hill 


34.82 


Brockville 


10,840.41 


Chesterville 


4,083.99 


Lancaster 


167.97 


Martintown 


19.22 


Maxville 


239.28 


Prescott 


3,545.67 
362.84 


Williamsburg 


Winchester 


2,572.82 


Brockville Rural Power Districts 




Chesterville Rural Power Districts 




Cr. 64.97 




Martintown Rural Power Districts 






Prescott Rural Power District 
















Totals 


18,570.77 


22,566.80 









RIDEAU 
Operating Account for Year 



Costs of Operating as Provided for under Sections 6c and 23 of the Act 

Power Purchased $6,711 . 83 

Costs of operating and maintaining the Generating Plant, Transmission 
Lines, Stations, etc., including the proportion of Administrative 

Expenses chargeable to the operation of this System 21,047.63 

Interest on Capital Investment 53,672 . 99 

Provision for Renewal of Generating Plant, Lines, Stations, etc 10,756. 11 

Provision for Contingencies: 

By charges against Municipalities $2,259.80 

By charges against contracts with Private Company, which purchased 

power 358 . 90 

2,618.70 

By appropriating the net profits on power sold to Private Company . . 3,823 . 91 

$98,631.17 



923 



HYDRO-ELECTRIC POWER COMMISSION 



263 



SYSTEM 

Supplied to it to 31st October, 1921 — The Gash Receipts, Adjustments Made and Interest 
Municipality in Respect of Power Supplied in the Year Ending 31st October, 1922 
Credit or Charge to each Municipality at 31st October, 1922 



Cash Receipts on 
account of such 
charges, also ad- 
justments made, 
during the Year 


Interest at 4% per 

annum added during 

the Year 


Net amount Credited 

or Charged in respect 

of power supplied in 

the year ending 

31st October, 1922 


Accumulated amount 
standing as a 
Credit or Charge on 
31st October, 1922 


Credited 


Charged 


Credited 


Charged 


Credited 


Charged 


Credit 


Charge 


$ c. 


$ c. 


$ c. 


$ c. 
111.61 

14.55 

"21,37 

51.87 

4.39 
61.58 


$ c. 

12! 13 

14,377.04 
3,073.01 


$ c. 
903.21 


$ c. 


$ c 
3,805.05 








366.06 




4,377.44 
1,070.92 


271.54 




17,059.47 
1,446.42 














1,831.48 
""930'40 


3,180.01 


295.91 






151.14 
" 2,030 !i9 


165.97 

' "2,867." 18 

61.28 

3,511.74 

778.36 










2,531.53 


565 73 


2,836.37 


127.69 

2.72 

55.20 




566 13 




304.28 




617.19 


877.56 




2,549.76 
778.36 














2.60 




123.84 
578.16 


56.27 












578.16 










54.62 


54.62 
















2,044.96 


9,162.29 


459.75 


265.37 


23,026.25 


4,671.37 


25,945.04 


10,517.08 



SYSTEM 

Ending 31st October, 1922 



Revenue for Period 

Collected from Municipalities $101,417.63 

Power sold to Private Company 15,682 . 05 

$117,099.68 
Deduct amounts collected from Municipalities in excess of the sums required to be 

paid by them for power supplied in the period 18,468 . 5 1 

Revenue $98,631 . 17 



$98,631.17 



264 



FIFTEENTH ANNUAL REPORT OF THE 



No. 49 



RIDEAU 

Statement Showing the Amount to be Paid by Each Municipality as the Cost- 
Received by the Commission from Each Municipality on Account of such 
upon Ascertainment (by Annual Adjustment) of the Actual 



Municipality 


Interim Rates per 

Horsepower collected 

by Commission 

during year 


Share of 
Capital Cost 
of system on 

which 
interest and 

fixed 

charges are 

payable 


Average 
Horse- 
power 
supplied in 
year after 
correction 
for power 
factor 


Cost of 
Power to 
Com- 
mission 




To 

Dec. 31, 

1921 


To 

Oct. 31, 

1922 


Carleton Place 


$ c. 
44.00 
80.00 
92.50 
45.00 
40.00 


$ c 
44.00 
80.00 
92.50 
45.00 
40.00 


$ c. 

337,509.25 

52,512.03 

23,086.50 

218,790.71 

312,403.54 


791.9 
91.7 
32.4 

499. 

844.8 


$ c. 
2,029.67 


Kemptville 


235.03 


Lanark 


83.04 


Perth 


1,278.96 


Smiths Falls 


2,165.26 






Totals — Municipalities .... 






944,302.03 
136,709.87 


2,259.8 
358.9 


5,791.96 


Totals — Companies 






919.87 










Grand Totals 






1,081,011.90 


2,618.7 


6,711.83 











RIDEAU SYSTEM 

Reserve for Contingencies Account, 31st October, 1922 

Balance brought forward, 31st October, 1921 

Added during the year ending 31st October, 1922: 

Amounts charged to Municipalities as part of the Cost of Power 

delivered to them _... $2,259.80 

Provision against equipment employed in respect of contracts with 

Sundry Companies 358 . 90 

Net profits from contracts with Sundry Power Customers 3,823.91 

Interest at 4% per annum on monthly balances to the credit of the 

account 47 . 33 

Balance carried forward, 31st October, 1922 



,183.31 



6,489.94 
$7,673.25 



1923 



HYDRO-ELECTRIC POWER COMMISSION 



265 



SYSTEM 

under Section 23 of the Act — of Power Supplied to it by the Commission, the Amount 
Cost, and the Amount Remaining to be Credited to each Municipality 
Cost of Power Supplied to it in the Year Ending 31st October, 1922 



Share of Operating Costs and Fixed Charges 


Total Cost 

of Power 

for year as 

provided to 

be paid 

under 
section 23 

of Act 


Amounts 
paid to the 
Com- 
mission 
by each 
munici- 
pality 


Amounts remaining to 


Operating 
Main- 
tenance 

and 
Adminis- 
trative 
Expenses 


Interest 


Renewals 


Contin- 
gencies 


be credited 

to each municipality 

upon ascertainment of 

the actual Cost of 

Power by annual 

adjustment 


$ c. 
6,119.42 
1,530.59 

574.81 
4,065 . 64 
6,247.96 


$ c. 

16,814.26 

2,524.95 

1,150.89 

10,900.35 

15,559.65 


$ c. 

3,369.60 

506.00 

230.63 

2,184.45 

3,118.16 


$ c. 

791.90 
91.70 
32.40 

499.00 

844.80 


$ c. 

29,124.85 

4,888.27 

2,071.77 

18,928.40 

27,935.83 


$ c 

34,843.16 

7,334.65 

2,992.34 

22,455.81 

33,791.67 


$ c. 
5,718.31 
2,446.38 

920.57 
3,527.41 
5,855.84 


18,538.42 
2,509.21 


46,950.10 
6,722.89 


9,408.84 
1,347.27 


2,259.80 
358.90 


82,949.12 
11,858.14 


101,417.63 
15,682.05 


18,468.51 
3,823.91* 


21,047.63 


53,672.99 


10,756.11 


2,618.70 


94,807.26 


117,099.68 





Note. — "Transferred to Credit of Contingency Reserve. 



RIDEAU SYSTEM 

Reserve for Renewals Account, 31st October, 1922 

Total provision for Renewals to 31st October, 1921 $38,472 .98 

Less reduction upon adjustment of Renewal Rates 16,242 .07 

Deduct expenditures to 31st October, 1921 

Balance brought forward, 31st October, 1921 

Added during the year ending 31st October, 1922: 

Amounts charged to Municipalities as part of the Cost of Power 

delivered to thein < . $9,408.84 

Provision against equipment employed in respect of contracts with 

Sundry Companies 1,347 .27 

Interest at 4% per annum on monthly balances to the credit of the 

account , 884 . 94 

Renewals Reserve provided on second-hand equipment purchased. . . 12.47 

Expenditures during the year ending 31st October, 1922 

Balance carried forward, 31st October, 1922 



$22,230.91 
107.51 

$22,123.40 



11,653.52 

$33,776.92 
5.92 

$33,771.00 



266 



FIFTEENTH ANNUAL REPORT OF THE 



No. 49 



RIDEAU 

Statement Showing the Net Credit or Charge to Each Municipality in Respect of Power 
Added During the Year — also the Net Amount Credited to Each Municipality 

Accumulated Amount Standing as a Credit to 



Municipality 


Date 

commenced 

operating 


Net Credit or Charge 
at 31st October, 1921 


Amounts Credited 

upon adjustment of 

renewals reserve 


* 


Credit 


Charge 


Credited 


Carleton Place 


May, 1919 
Sept., 1921 
Feb., 1919 
Sept., 1918 
Dec, 1921 


$ c. 

808.58 

65.04 


$ c. 


$ c. 

5,246.29 

19.15 


Lanark 




Perth 


4,088.85 


4,634.29 
5,709.79 


Smiths Falls 


2,632.06 


Kemptville 
















3,505.68 


4,088.85 


15,609.52 



THUNDER BAY 
OPERATING ACCOUNT FOR YEAR 



Cost of operation 

Cost of operating and maintaining the Generating Plant, Transmission Lines 
and Stations; including the proportion of administrative expenses chargeable 
to the operation of this System 

Interest on Capital Investment 



$80,973 61 
404,202.68 



$485,176.29 



Notes — 

1. Nipigon Fibre & Paper Co., Limited, charged with power held in reserve 

for it upon a basis of 75 per cent, of previous maximum demand: 
3,067.3 horsepower at $24.00. Amount not included in revenue 
of System $73,615 20 

2. Operating, maintenance, and administrative expenses plus interest — as 

above $485,176. 29 

Charged the City of Port Arthur with 8,908.16 horse- 
power at $25.00 per horsepower $222,704. 15 

Actually received from the City of Port Arthur calculated on basis of 
8,908.16 horsepower, at $19.75 per horsepower plus $517.22 per 

month 182,142.92 

Difference not covered by cash revenue •.••;• 303,033 37 

As against which payment of interest was withheld from the Provincial 

Government to the extent of 289,132 34 



1923 



HYDRO-ELECTRIC POWER COMMISSION 



267 



SYSTEM 

Supplied to it to 31st October, 1921 — Payments thereon, Adjustments Made and Interest 
in Respect of Power Supplied in the Year Ending 31st October, 1922 — and the 
Each Municipality at 31st October, 1922 



Payments on 

account of such 

credits during 

the year 



Interest at 4% per 

annum added during 

the year 



Net amount 

Credited in respect of 

power supplied in 

the year ending 

31st October, 1922 



Accumulated amount 

standing as a 

Credit on 

31st October, 1922 



Charged 


Credited Credited 


Credit 


$ c. 

808.58 

65.04 


$ c. 

227.31 

2.17 

21.82 
264.30 


$ c. 
5,718.31 

920.57 
3,527.41 
5,855.84 
2,446.38 


$ c. 
11,191.91 
941.89 
4,094.67 • 


2,632.06 


11,829:93 
2,446.38 








3,505.68 


515.60 


18,468.51 


30,504.78 



SYSTEM 

ENDING 31st OCTOBER, 1922 



Revenue for period 

Charged to City of Port Arthur at rate of $25.00 per horsepower $222,704. 15 

Revenue. . $222,704 15 

Portion of Interest deferred and collectible out of future revenue from the City 

of Port Arthur and other power customers on the System 262,472 14 

$485,176 29 



268 



FIFTEENTH ANNUAL REPORT OF THE 



No. 49 



THUNDER BAY 

Statement Showing the Cost of Operation, Administration and Interest and the 
$25.00 per Horsepower in the year ending 31st October, 1922; also the Balance 

the City of Port Arthur and Other 



Municipality 


Rates per 

horsepower 

charged during 

year 


Capital Cost 

of system as at 

31st October, 

1922 


Average 

horsepower 

supplied in year 

after correction 

for power 

factor 


Port Arthur 


$25.00 


$6,642,770.13 


$8,908.16 





Notes — 

1. Nipigon Fibre & Paper Co., Limited, charged with power held in reserve 

for it upon a basis of 75 per cent, of previous maximum demand: 
3,067.3 horsepower at $24.00. Amount not included in revenue 
of System 

2. Operating, maintenance, and administrative expenses plus interest, 

as above 

Charged the City of Port Arthur with 8,908.16 horsepower at $25.00 
per horsepower $222,704 15 



Actually received from the City of Port Arthur, calculated on basis of 
8,908.16 horsepower, at $19.75 per horsepower plus $517.22 per month 



Difference not covered by cash revenue 

As against which payment of interest was withheld from the Provincial 



Government to the extent of 



$73,615 20 
485,176 29 

182,142.92 



$303,033 37 
289,132 34 



THUNDER BAY SYSTEM 

Reserve for Renewals Account, 31st October, 1922 

Total provision for renewal of (original) station and line to 31st October, 1921 $41,311 97 

Deduct — 

Expenditures to 31st October, 1921 9. 75 

Balance brought forward, 31st October, 1921 $41,302.22 

Added during the year 1922 — 

Interest at 4% per annum on the balance to the credit of the account. . . 1,652 09 

$42,954.31 
Deduct — 

Expenditures during the year ending 31st October, 1922 520.80 

Total $42,433 . 5 1 

Note: No provision for Renewals charged against operations in the year ending 31st Oc- 
tober, 1922. 



THUNDER BAY SYSTEM 

Statement showing the Total Sinking Fund Payments by the City of Port Arthur 

to 31st October, 1920; together with Interest allowed thereon 

to 31st October, 1922 





Sinking fund paid 


Interest at 4% 
per annum allowed 
thereon to 31st 
October, 1922 


Total sinking fund 
payment and ac- 


Municipality 


Period covered 


Amount 


cumulated interest 

to 31st October, 

1922 


Port Arthur 


10 years ending 
31st October, 1920 


$17,437.40 


$4,678.05 


$22,115.45 



1923 



HYDRO-ELECTRIC POWER COMMISSION 



269 



SYSTEM 

Amount charged the City of Port Arthur for Power Delivered at the Interim Rate of 
of the Year's Interest remaining to be collected out of Future Revenues from 
Power Customers of the System. 



Operating, 

maintenance and 

administrative 

expenses 


Amount charged 

to City of 

Port Arthur 


Excess of 

revenue over 

operating, 

maintenance and 

administrative 

expenses 


Interest 


Balance of interest 
deferred and col- 
lectible out of 
future revenue 


$80,973 . 61 


$222,704.15 


$141,730.54 


$404,202.68 


$262,472.14 



THUNDER BAY SYSTEM 

Reserve for Contingencies Account, 31st October, 1922 

Balance brought forward, 31st October, 1921 $4,424. 66 

Interest at 4% per annum on the balance to the credit of the account 176.99 

Total $4,601 . 65 



THUNDER BAY SYSTEM 

Statement showing Amount of Interest Deferred and Collectible out of Future Revenue 

from the City of Port Arthur and Other Power Customers 

on the System as at 31st October, 1922 



Amount deferred 
as per operating 
statement for the 

year ending 
31st October, 1921 


Additional interest for the 
year, ending 31st October, 
1921, being the difference 
between current rates paid 
by the Province and the 
rate of 5 per cent 
previously charged 


Amount deferred 

as per operating 

statement for the 

year ending 
31st October, 1922 


Total interest de- 
ferred as at 
31st October, 1922 


$18,708.83 


$37,139.68 


$262,472.14 


$318,320.65 



270 FIFTEENTH ANNUAL REPORT OF THE No. 49 

CENTRAL ONTARIO AND TRENT SYSTEM 
AND NIPISSING SYSTEM 

The following balance sheet and operating account relates to the systems 
known as "Central Ontario and Trent" and "Nipissing" which together serve 
electrical energy to fifty-five municipalities and companies. The Central 
Ontario and Trent system extends from the municipality of Whitby on the 
west to and including the city of Kingston on the east and as far north as Lindsay. 
The Nipissing system supplies the town of North Bay and vicinity. These 
systems were purchased by the provincial Government, as at the 1st of March, 
1916, from the Electric Power Company, Limited, which owned or controlled 
the capital stock of twenty- two subsidiary companies, the purchase price being 
the sum of $8,350,000, payable in ten years, secured by a government bond 
issue bearing interest at four per cent per annum. 

Since the acquisition of these properties, and their transfer to the Com- 
mission to operate in trust for the Government, it has been found necessary to 
-enlarge, extend and improve the systems to meet the increasing demands for 
'electric service. 

The Central Ontario system and the Trent system both receive their 
•electrical energy from the same sources of power supply through the same main 
transmission network and from the standpoint of power development and 
•electrical operation are regarded as a unit and now known as the Central Ontario 
and Trent system. It may be explained that after the Central Ontario system 
was purchased by the Provincial Government, a number of municipalities in 
central Ontario, from time to time, applied to the Hydro-Electric Power Com- 
mission for power to be supplied under the provisions of the Power Commission 
Act. The municipalities in central Ontario which thus enter into direct re- 
lationship with the Hydro-Electric Power Commission are for purposes of 
financial administration grouped in what is termed the "Trent" system. 

The operation of these two systems — the "Central Ontario and Trent" 
and the "Nipissing" — entails the generation, transformation and transmission 
of electrical energy to thirty-five municipalities and twenty companies, and 
in addition thereto the operation of three gas plants — at Peterborough, Oshawa 
and Cobourg — the Cobourg Waterworks, the Peterborough street railway, 
the Campbellford pulp mill and certain pulpwood limits connected therewith. 

With the exception of fourteen municipalities, namely, Bloomfield, Have- 
lock, Kingston, Lakefield, Madoc, Marmora, Norwood, Omemee, Oshawa 
Rural District, Peterborough, Picton, Stirling, Wellington and Whitby, twelve 
of which were connected to the system subsequent to the date of purchase, 
and constitute the Trent system, the whole property, local and otherwise, is 
operated and maintained by the Commission. Although the ownership of the 
whole plant is vested in the province (except the fourteen local systems of the 
municipalities mentioned) precisely the same methods, with respect to the con- 
trol of rates, operation, maintenance, and provision for renewal of plant and 
equipment, are applied, as appertain to other systems controlled and operated 
by the Commission. 

An annual adjustment of the system's capital cost and expenses is made 
and those municipalities operating their own utilities and which have contracts 
for power to be supplied at cost, receive an additional charge or credit — as the 
case may be — on account of power cost as ascertained by this adjustment, just 
as is done in the case of the municipalities comprising the Niagara system and 
other systems. 



1923 HYDRO-ELECTRIC POWER COMMISSION 27 



CENTRAL ONTARIO AND TRENT SYSTEM 
AND NIPISSING SYSTEM 



FINANCIAL STATEMENTS 



Statement of Assets and Liabilities, 31st October, 1922 

Operating Account for Year Ended 31st October, 1922 

Surplus Account 

Statement Showing Amount to be Paid by Certain 
Municipalities as the Cost of Power 

Reserve for Contingencies Account, 31st October, 1922 

Reserve for Renewals Account, 31st October, 1922 

Statement Showing Net Credit or Charge to Each 
Municipality in Respect of Power Supplied 

Statement Respecting Rural Lines 



272 



FIFTEENTH ANNUAL REPORT OF THE 



No. 49 



CENTRAL ONTARIO 

(ALSO NIPISSING 

Operated 

Hydro -Electric Power 

STATEMENTS OF ASSETS AND 



Assets 
Central Ontario: 

Power Developments and Hydraulic Rights $6,155,445.01 

Transformer Stations 725,237.53 

Transmission Lines 1,570,974.29 

' $8,451,656.83 

Service Buildings 17,477.57 

Local Utilities— Electric, Gas, Water and Street Railway.. . 2,534,518.81 

Nipissing: 

Power Development and Steam Plant $425,406.89 

Transformer Stations 36,177.40 

Transmission Lines 43,322.00 

504,906.29 

Local Utilities— Electric. 199,842.68 

Rural Lines 34,328.16 

Pulpmill and Pulpwood Areas 506,182.96 

$12,248,913.30 

Investments : 

Debentures of the Town of Trenton, re sale of Waterworks. $19,637.66 

Debentures of the Town of Napanee re sale of Property and 

Water Privileges 12,499.15 

Interest accrued on same 1,240.88 

33,377.69 

Cash in Bank, and on deposit with the Commission 365,686.34 

Inventories: 

Tools and Equipment $56,775.86 

Material and Supplies 359,629.01 

416,404.87 

Accounts Receivable 

Power and Pulp Mill Accounts $125,930.63 

Consumers' Supply — Sales Accounts \ . . 21,519.05 

Consumers' Light and Power Accounts 37,094.81 

$184,544.49 
Less: Reserve for Doubtful Accounts 9,999.06 

174,545.43 

Balances due by certain Municipalities in respect of the costs of 
power supplied to them as provided to be paid under their 
contracts with the Commission $36,996.97 

Due by Municipalities in respect of the operation of Rural 

Lines 8,925.23 

45,922.20 

Expenses Prepaid 26,044.94 

Deferred Maintenance; re-insulation of Transmission Lines, 

chargeable 'to future operations 28,438.87 

Operating Deficit 155,119.54 



$13,494,453.18 



1923 HYDRO-ELECTRIC POWER COMMISSION 273 

AND TRENT SYSTEM 

SYSTEM) 

by the 

Commission of Ontario 

LIABILITIES, 31st OCTOBER, 1922 



Liabilities 
Provincial Treasurer: 

Purchase Price of System $8,350,000.00 

Debentures issued in connection with purchase of Bruton 

Township Pulpwood Area 225,000.00 

Cash Advances 3,532,858.78 

$12,107,858.78 

Accounts payable and accrued charges $111,317.11 

Consumers' Deposits 13,276.37 

Unearned Water Rates 2,400.00 

126,993.48 

Balances due to certain Municipalities in respect of accounts paid 
by them in excess of the cost of power supplied to them as • 
provided to be paid under their contracts with the Com- 
mission 4,278.65 

Reserve for Renewals. 1,179,922.25 

Reserve for Contingencies 38,058.00 

Reserve for Sinking Fund: 

For retirement of Bonds issued in purchase of Bruton Town- 
ship Pulpwood Areas - $31,353.89 

For repayment of cost of Mill at Bancroft 3,497.88 

In respect of Rural Lines 2,940.25 

37,342.02 



$13,494,453.18 



274 FIFTEENTH ANNUAL REPORT OF THE No. 49 

CENTRAL ONTARIO 

(ALSO NIPISSING 

OPERATING ACCOUNT FOR 



Cost of Operations 
Power Department: 

Power Purchased .•■•;•: $12,076.95 

Cost of Operating and Maintaining Generating Piants, Trans- 
mission Lines, Stations, etc., including rentals of Water 
Powers, and the proportion of administrative expenses charge- 
able to the operation of the Power Department 366,553.52 

Interest on Capital Investment 341,225.01 

Provision for Renewal of Generating Plants, Lines, Stations, etc.. . 66,795.94 
Provision for Contingencies 33,763.10 

$820,414.52 

Utilities: 

Cost of Operating and Maintaining Electric Light Distribution Sys- 
tems, Gas Systems, Water System and the Peterboro Street 
Railway, including all materials and supplies purchased and 
the proportion of administrative expenses chargeable to the 

operation of these utilities $439,776.51 

Interest on Capital Investment 122,300.72 

Provision for Renewal of Plants and Equipment 44,399.81 

606,477.04 

Total Cost of Operation of Power Department and Utilities 1,426,891.56 

Cost of operating the "Oshawa" Rural Lines, including power supplied, 

operating expenses, interest, renewals and sinking fund 8,297. 19 

Net loss for year on operation of Pulp Mill and Bruton Township 

Pulpwood Areas 91,462.54 

1,526,651.29 
Net Operating Surplus for year 10,815.81 

$1,537,467.10 



SURPLUS 



Debit Balance brought forward, 31st October, 1921 $168,930.15 






$168,930.15 






1923 



HYDRO-ELECTRIC POWER COMMISSION 



275 



AND TRENT SYSTEM 

SYSTEM) 

YEAR ENDING 31st OCTOBER, 1922 



Revenue 

Power sold to Private Companies and certain Municipalities $261,389.73 

Power supplied to certain other Municipalities at cost in accordance 

with their contracts with the Commission 132,060.70 

Power supplied at cost to the Peterboro Street Railway and the Camp- 

bellford Pulp Mill 31,184.27 

Light and Power sold to Consumers on the twenty Electric Light Dis- 
tribution Systems 

Gas sold to Consumers on four Gas Systems and sales of by-products. . 

'Water sold to Consumers on one Water System 

Revenue from Peterboro Street Railway 

Total Revenue from Power Department and Utilities 

'Revenue from the operation of the "Oshawa" Rural Lines, less the 
balances credited to the Municipalities under their contracts with 
the Commission 

'Net profit on sales of equipment and supplies 



$424,634. 70 

757,742.79 

192,109.46 

38,336.11 

90,801.70 

$1,503,624.76 



8,297.19 
25,545.15 



$1,537,467.10 



ACCOUNT 



Balances chargeable to Capital Construction in respect of the cost of power supplied 

in the three years ending 31st October, 1921. $1,809.92 

Additional charges against certain Municipalities, in respect of cost of power sup- 
plied in the year ending 31st October, 1921 1,184.88 

Net Operating Surplus for the year ending 31st October, 1922 10,815.81 

Balance, as shown on statement of Assets and Liabilities 155,119.54 

$168,930.15 



276 



FIFTEENTH ANNUAL REPORT OF THE 



No. 49 



CENTRAL ONTARIO 

Statement Showing the Amount to be Paid by Each of the Following Municipalities 

Amount Received by the Commission from Each Municipality on Account 

upon Ascertaining, by Annual Adjustment, the Actual Cost of 



Municipality 



Bloomfield . 
Havelock. . 
Lakefield . . 
Marmora. . 
Norwood . . 
Peterboro . . 

Picton 

Wellington 
Whitby.... 



Interim Rates per 
Horsepower 
collected by 

Commission dur- 
ing Year 



To Dec. 
31, 1921 



$ c. 
66.16 
68.00 
36.36 
53.70 
42.00 



64.14 
52.76 



To Oct. 
31, 1922 



$ c. 
72.50 
65.00 
45.00 
35.00 
38.00 
22.50 
52.00 
50.00 
29.00 



Share of 

Capital Cost 

of system on 

which interest 

and fixed 

charges are 

payable 



$ c 
24,870.49 
32,175.42 
45,399.64 
16,350.39 
19,326.84 
,024,883.45 

164,070.86 
36,805.90 

126,699.37 



1,490,582.36 



Average 
Horsepower 
supplied in 
year after 
correction 
for power 
factor 



32 
57 
97 
43 
58 
4,471 

295 
70 

494 



5,620.1 



Share of 



Operating 
Mainten- 
ance and 
Adminis- 
trative 
Expenses 



$ c. 

682.93 

1,199.59 

1,238.50 

696.86 

872.55 

42,107.15 

4,194.17 

1,034.45 

5,634.59 



57,660.79 



CENTRAL ONTARIO AND TRENT SYSTEM 



RESERVE FOR CONTINGENCIES ACCOUNT 31st OCTOBER, 1922 

Balance brought forward 31st October, 192 1 

Added during the year ending 31st October, 1922 — 

By charges against Operations $33,763.10 

Interest at 4% per annum on the monthly balances to the credit of 

the account 306.03 



Deduct: 

Expenditures to cover contingencies met with during the year ending 
31st October, 1922 



$7,952.61 



34,069.13 



$42,021.74 
3,963.74 



Balance carried forward 31st October, 1922. 



$38,058.00 



1923 



HYDRO-ELECTRIC POWER COMMISSION 



277 



AND TRENT SYSTEM 

as the Cost of Power Supplied to It under Its Contract with the Commission, 
of Such Cost, and the Amount Credited or Charged to Each Municipality 
Power Supplied to It in the Year Ending 31st October, 1922 



the 



Operating Costs and Fixed Charges 


Total Cost 

of Power 

for year as 

provided to 

be paid under 

contracts 


Amounts 
paid to the 
Commission 

by each 
municipality 
or customer 


Amount credited 
to each munici- 
pality upon ascer- 
taining the Cost 
of Power by an- 
nual adjustment 


Interest 


Renewals 


Con- 
tingencies 


$ c. 

1,016.88 

1,307.60 

1,806.53 

639.67 

760.06 

37,843.46 

6,609.90 

1,474.78 

4,678.08 


$ c. 
267.67 
328.97 
437.96 
146.28 
167.52 
6,838.73 
1,655.89 
365.33 
904.76 


$ c. 
32.30 
57.20 
97.00 
43.20 
58.00 
4,471.40 

295.60 
70.90 

494.50 


$ c. 

1,999.78 

2,893.36 

3,579.99 

1,526.01 

1,858.13 

91,260.74 

12,755.56 

2,945.46 

11,711.93 


$ c. 
2,316.58 
3,743.98 
4,153.00 
1,666.84 
2,227.73 
100,606.04 

16,021.79 
3,575,72 

14,339.85 


$ c. 

316.80 

850.62 

573.01 

140.83 

369.60 

9,345.30 

3,266.23 

630.26 

2,627.92 


56,136.96 


11,113.11 


5,620.10 


130,530.96 


148,651.53 


18,120.57 



CENTRAL ONTARIO AND TRENT SYSTEM 



RESERVE FOR RENEWALS ACCOUNT, 31st OCTOBER, 1922 

Total provision for Renewals to 31st October, 1921 $1,090,319.22 

Deduct: 

Expenditures to 31st October, 1921 45,892.70 

Balance brought forward 31st October, 1921 $1,044,426.52 

Added during the year ending 31st October, 1922 — 

By charges against Operations $115,185.46 

Interest at 4% per annum on the monthly balances to the credit 

of the account 41,734.96 

■ 156,920.42 

$1,201,346 94 
Deduct: 

Expenditures during the year ending 31st October, 1922 21,424.69 

Balance carried forward 31st October, 1922 $1,179,922.25 



278 



FIFTEENTH ANNUAL REPORT OF THE 



No. 49 



CENTRAL ONTARIO 

Statement Showing the Net Credit or Charge to each Municipality in Respect of 

thereon and Interest Added During the year, also the Net Amount Credited 

Year Ending 31st October, 1922, and the Accumulated Amount Standing 






Cash receipts and 

payments on 

account of such 

Credits and 

Charges made 

during the year 



Municipality 



Date 

commenced 

operating 



Net Credit or Charge 
at 31st October, 1921 



Credit 



Charge 



Adiustment of 

1921 Power 

Cost 



Credit 



Charge 



Credited 



Charged 



Bloomfield . 
Havelock. . 
Lakefield. . 
Marmora. . 
Norwood . . 
Peterboro . . 

Picton 

Wellington . 
Whitby.... 



Apr., 

Feb., 

Aug., 

Jan., 

Feb., 

Mar., 

Apr., 

April, 

Mar., 



1919 
1921 
1920 
1921 
1921 
1916 
1919 
1919 
1916 



$ c. 


231.32 


843.42 
120.96 


5,984.37 





$ c. 
1,129.29 



$ c. 
1.46 



$ 



$ c, 



465.20 



$ c. 
231.32 



1,100.09 



4.83 



580.03 
383.44 



843.42 
120.96 



40,656.39 



372.27 
4,808.42 



200.96 

11.74 

3.02 

17.31 



372.27 



5,984.37 






Oshawa Rural 
I* District 
Whitby Twp. . . . 
East Whitby Twp 
Pickering Twp.. . 



April, 1918 



7,180.07 



10,899.90 



48,066.46 



239.32 



1,428.67 



372.27 



7,180.07 



CENTRAL ONTARIO 
RURAL 



Municipality 


Capital Cost 


Cost of Power 


Operating 
Maintenance 
and Adminis- 
tration 

Expenses 


Oshawa Rural District 

East Whitby Township 


$ c. 


$ c. 


$ c. 


Whitby Township 


49,957.96 


1,529.74 


1,773.16 


Pickering Township 









1923 



HYDRO-ELECTRIC POWER COMMISSION 



279 



AND TRENT SYSTEM 

Power Supplied to it to 31st October 1921, the Gash Receipts, Payments and Adjustments 

or Charged to each Municipality in respect of Power supplied in the 

as a Credit or Charge to each Municipality at 31st October, 1922. 



Interest at 4% per annum 
added during the year 


Net amount Credited or 

Charged in respect of power 

supplied in the year ending 

31st, October, 1922 


Accumulated amount standing 

as a Credit or Charge on 

31st October, 1922 


Credited 


Charged 


Credited 


Charged 


Credit 


Charge 


$ c. 


$ c. 
45.11 
18.61 
43.81 
23.20 
15.34 
1,618.22 


$ c. 

316.80 

850.62 

573.01 

140.83 

369.60 

9,345.30 

3,266.23 

630.26 

2,627.92 


$ c. 


$ c. 


$ c. 
856.14 






366.81 








566.06 








462.40 








29.18 








32,728.35 


.47 




3,278.44 
633.40 




.12 










191.65 




2,354.84 










.59 


1,955.94 
435.96 


18,120.57 
2,409.82 




4,278.65 


36,996.97 






8,925.23 



AND TRENT SYSTEM 
LINES 



Fixed Charges 


Instalments 

paid on 
bonds issued 
by townships 


Total Cost 
of Power 
Operating 
Expenses 
and Fixed 
Charges 


Revenue 

from 
consumers 


Amount 

remaining 

to be credited 


Interest 


Renewals 


Sinking 
Fund 


to the muni- 
cipalities 


$ c. 
2,869.58 


$ c. 
995.48 


$ c. 
568.70 


$ c. 
560.53 


$ c. 
8,297.19 


$ c. 
10,707.01 


$ c. 
2,409.82 



280 FIFTEENTH ANNUAL REPORT OF THE No. 49 



THOROLD 

Statement of Assets and 

Assets 

Transmission and Distribution System, Contracts, Franchises and Goodwill. . . . $102,076.98 

Due by Consumers in respect of power accounts : 8,661 . 12 

Hydro-Electric Power Commission of Ontario — 

Cash in the hands of the Commission belonging to this System 81,429. 53 



$192,167.63 



THOROLD 

Operating Account for Year 



Cost of Operation 



Power purchased .•■••;•. : • : : •. • ■ $23,291 . 15 

Cost of operating and maintaining Transmission Lines and Stations, including 

the proportion of Administrative Expenses chargeable to this System.. . . 1,463.73 

Interest 4,110.08 

Provision for Renewal of Lines and Stations 978. 22 

Provisions for Sinking Fund — 

For repayment of the purchase price of the System $1,940.06 

Collected from the Municipality of Thorold as part of the 

cost of power delivered to it 290. 12 

2,230.18 

$32,073.36 
Operating profit for year 20,790. 14 

$52,863.50 



Surplus 

Appropriated for the purpose of providing additional Sinking Fund for repay- 
ment of the purchase price of the System $20,790 . 14 






$20,790.14 



923 



HYDRO-ELECTRIC POWER COMMISSION 



281 



SYSTEM 

Liabilities, 31st October, 1922 



Liabilities 

Hydro-Electric Power Commission of Ontario — 

Bonds issued to cover purchase price $100,000.00 

Balance due to the Municipality of Thorold in respect of amount paid by it to 
31st October, 1922, in excess of, the cost of power supplied to it as provided 
to be paid under its contract with the Commission 1,318. 76 

Sinking Fund Reserves — 

For repayment of the purchase price of the System 86,621.29 

Collected from the Municipality of Thorold 290. 12 

Reserve for renewals 3,937 . 46 



$192,167.63 



SYSTEM 

Ending 31st October, 1922 



Revenue for Period 

Power supplied to Municipality of Thorold at the interim rate 

of $22.25 per horsepower $8,636.04 

Less: Rebate covering the 22 months ending 31st October, 
1922, upon ascertainment of the actual cost of 

delivering power 1,318. 76 

$ 7,317.28 

Power sold to private companies 41,814.97 

Commissions (or royalties) received from the Ontario Power Company of Niagara 

Falls on power sold by it to power customers in Thorold District • . . . 3,731 . 25 



$52,863.50 



account 



Operating profit for year 



$20,790.14 



$20,790.14 



282 FIFTEENTH ANNUAL REPORT OF THE No. 49 



ESSEX COUNTY 
STATEMENT OF ASSETS AND 

Assets 
Transmission Lines, Transformer Stations and Local Distribution Systems $387,441.28 

Furniture and Equipment: 

Office Furniture $1,136.78 

Motor Trucks 680.00 

Tools 552.09 

2,368.87 

Materials and Supplies 13,846.74 

Accounts Receivable: 

Consumers Accounts — Power and Light $2,218.15 

Consumers Accounts — Sundry Supplies 1,014.15 

Land Sold — Secured by Mortgage 1,011.66 

$4,243.96 
Less reserve for doubtful accounts 250.00 

3,993.96 

Operating Deficit: 

Balance forward 31st, October, 1921 $32,766.32 

Net profit for year ending 31st October, 1922 29,188.00 

Net Deficit 3,578.32 

$411,229.17 



ESSEX COUNTY 
OPERATING ACCOUNT FOR 

Cost of Operation 
Power Purchased $39,240.27 

Cost of Operating and Maintaining Transmission Lines, Stations and Distribution 
Systems, including the proportion of Administrative Expenses chargeable to 
the operation of this System 28,924.11 

Interest on Capital Investment 19,058.72 

Provision for renewal of Lines, Stations and Distribution Systems 7,380.96 

Provision for Sinking Fund 4,269.54 

Total Cost of Operation $98,873.60 

Operating Profit for the year 29,188.00 

$128,061.60 



923 HYDRO-ELECTRIC POWER COMMISSION 283 



SYSTEM 

LIABILITIES, 31st OCTOBER, 1922 

Liabilities 

Hydro-Electric Power Commission of Ontario: 

Bonds issued to cover purchase price $226,000.00 

Cash Advances from the Province of Ontario 22,000.00 

Cash Advances from the General Funds of the Commission 93,960.09 

$341,960.09 

Consumers Deposits 1,103.50 

Reserve for Sinking Fund 20,211.54 

Reserve for Renewals 47,954.04 



$411,229.17 



SYSTEM 

YEAR ENDING 31st OCTOBER, 1922 



Revenue for Period 

Sales of Power and Light $125,577.18 

Profit on Sales of Supplies 2,484.42 



$128,061.60 



284 FIFTEENTH ANNUAL REPORT OF THE No. 49 



ONTARIO POWER COMPANY 



The Ontario Power Company of Niagara Falls, including the Ontario 
Transmission Company, Limited, were purchased by the Commission under 
the authority of the Legislature (7 Geo. V., cap. 20), and with the express 
approval of the Hydro-Electric municipalities of the Niagara zone. The plant 
has been operated by the Commission since August 1st, 1917. The statements 
submitted herewith show the Balance Sheet as of October 31st, 1922, the 
Operating Report for the year ending on that date, and a digest of the 
Appropriation Account showing the distribution of the surplus earnings, and 
the net surplus transferred to the Balance Sheet. 

The Operating Statement for the year ending October 31, 1922, shows 
a surplus of $549,892.27, after providing for all costs of operation, exchange, 
discount on bonds, bond and other interest charges, and an adequate yearly 
provision for renewal of the plant. This sum is augmented by the credit 
balance brought forward from 1921, the surplus arising from bond redemption 
during the year amounting to $4,044.41. Thus there is a surplus balance of 
$613,133.71, which has been appropriated to meet bond interest, exchange 
and the sinking fund requirements in respect to the Bonds issued by the Com- 
mission, leaving a net surplus of $89,792.93. 

The first contract for energy, signed by the Hydro-Electric Power Com- 
mission of Ontario, was made in 1908 with the Ontario Power Company, then 
a private corporation operating under a Federal charter. The agreement was 
for the purchase of an ultimate maximum of 100,000 horsepower, at a rate 
ranging from $9.40 to $9.00 per horsepower per annum. 

Within five years the full amount of energy contracted for was being 
taken, and more was urgently required to serve the needs of the associated 
municipalities of the Niagara System. 

The Ontario Power Company was the only one of the three generating 
corporations which was not using its full allotment of water. There was talk 
of expropriating one of the plants as a war measure, but while that proposal 
was still being discussed, the Hydro-Electric Power Commission obtained by 
negotiation an option on the Ontario Power Company's property as a going 
concern. Authority to acquire the shares of a private electrical corporation 
was granted to the Commission by the Legislature, and the municipalities of 
the Niagara System gave their approval to the proposed purchase. 

The agreement provided for the purchase by the Hydro-Electric Power 
Commission of the stock of the Ontario Power Company and its auxiliary, the 
Ontario Transmission Company, Limited, for the sum of $8,000,000 in forty-year, 
four per cent. Bonds of the Commission, guaranteed by the Province, and the 
assumption of the bonded indebtedness of the Corporation. 



1923 HYDRO-ELECTRIC POWER COMMISSION 285 

The purchase was made on August 1st, 1917. As soon as the property- 
came into the hands of the Commission plans were made to increase its normal 
generating capacity by putting in a new conduit, and adding two generating 
units. The cost of this conduit, a wood-stave pipe line, and of the equipment 
which it was designed to serve, was $3,514,676.62. 

The Operating Report shows a revenue for the year of $3,119,478.01, a little 
more than one-half of which was collected from the municipalities of the 
Niagara System for power supplied to them; that is to say, the private con- 
tracts of the plant provide a sufficient income to meet about 44 per cent, of the 
carrying charges — if the prices for power sold were equalized to municipal 
and private customers. 

After providing for interest charges of $1,050,083.30, operating expenses 
of $194,856.24, taxes, water rentals and other items of current outlay, the 
revenue permitted the setting aside of $116,491.96 for the renewal of the plant, 
the provision of $191,239.20 for maintenance charges and of $682,928.97 for 
the purchase of additional power required. There was a surplus balance of 
.$549,892.27 carried into Appropriation Account, as the statement shows. 



286 FIFTEENTH ANNUAL REPORT OF THE No. 49 

THE ONTARIO POWER COMPANY OF NIAGARA FALLS AND 

Balance Sheet 



Assets 

Plant, Real Estate, Transmission Lines, Distributing Stations and 

Rights, Franchises and Goodwill $25,132,427.40 

Third Pipe Line to Power Plant, including additional Generating 

Equipment 3,514,676.62 

$28,647,104.02 

Discount on Bonds capitalized, less amounts written off, 

$757,689 .95 933,695 . 96 

American Exchange on remittances to retire 1921 Bonds, less 

amounts written off, $24,236.93 . 333,920. 77 

1,267,616.73 

Construction Equipment 6,389 . 36 

Maintenance Tools and Equipment 25,944.81 

Furniture and Fixtures 8,533 . 19 

Instruments 452 . 96 

Horses, Wagons and Sundry Equipment 1,198.54 

Materials 40,926. 74 

83,445.60 

Accounts Receivable 333,110.42 

Cash in Bank— Current Account 198,973 . 16 

For payment of Outstanding Interest Coupons. . 51,295.00 

Sinking Fund on Deposit with Trustees 1,137. 24 

Deposit with Supreme Court of Canada — since returned 169,425.24 

753,941.06 

J. J. Albright — Claims against 295,633 . 20 

Insurance and Taxes prepaid 18,648 . 70 



$31,066,389.31 



1923 HYDRO-ELECTRIC POWER COMMISSION 287 

THE ONTARIO TRANSMISSION COMPANY, LIMITED 
31st October, 1922 

Liabilities 

Capital Stock: 

Ontario Power Company of Niagara Falls, 100,000 shares 

of par value of $100 each $10,000,000.00 

Ontario Transmission Company, Limited, 10,000 shares of 

par value of $100 each 1,000,000.00 

$11,000,000.00 

Bonds and Debentures: 

Ontario Power Company of Niagara Falls, First Mortgage 

5% Gold Bonds, due 1st February, 1943, issued and 

outstanding 9,092,000.00 

(Pledged to the Bank of Montreal to secure advances 

to the Hydro-Electric Power Commission of Ontario, 

$1,400,000.) 
Ontario Transmission Company, Limited, First Mortgage 

5% Gold Bonds, due 1st May, 1945 1,599,000.00 

Interest accrued to 31st October, 1922 153,625.00 

Interest Coupons due, not yet presented for payment. . . . 11,320.00 

10,855,945.00 



Hydro-Electric Power Commission of Ontario: 

Re Construction of Third Pipe Line 3,514,676.62 

Re 6% 1941 Bonds issued by the Commis- 
sion for the purpose of retiring the 1921 
issue of the Power Company $3,200,000.00 

Accrued Interest thereon 67,856. 16 



3,267.856.16 



Accrued Interest on $8,000,000 Bonds issued by the Com- 
mission to cover the purchase price of the capital stock 
of the Power Company 80,000.00 

Current Account 297,912.15 



7,160,444.93 

Accounts Payable and Accrued Charges 23,227. 60 

Reserve set aside to cover claims made by the Queen Victoria 

Niagara Falls Park Commission for contingencies 527,684.30 

Provision to cover accrued portion of Sinking Funds to 31st 
October, 1922, on: 

(a) Ontario Transmission Company 5% Bonds 10,248. 11 

(b) 6% 1941 bonds issued by the Commission for the 

purpose of retiring the 1921 issue of the Power 

Company 11,309.59 

21,557.70 

Reserve for Renewal of Plant, Equipment and Transmission Lines 1,387,736.85 

Surplus 89,792 . 93 



$31,066,389.31 



288 FIFTEENTH ANNUAL REPORT OF THE No. 49 

THE ONTARIO POWER COMPANY OF NIAGARA FALLS AND 
Combined Revenue and Expenditure Account 

Expenditure 

Power Purchased $682,928.97 

Water Power Rentals 122,505.54 

Taxes 95,109.56 

Maintenance Costs 191,239.20 

Operating Expenses 194,856.24 

Insurance Premiums 9,279.54 

Administration and Legal Expenses 60,750.46 

Depreciation on Furniture, Instruments, Construction Plant 

and Tools 46,340.97 1,403,010.48 

Provision for Renewal of Plant and Equipment 116,491 .96 

Bond Interest: — 

On issues of the Companies $539,794.45 

Exchange thereon 15,113.21 

On 6% 1941 issue of the Commission 192,000.00 

746,907.66 

Proportion of Discount on Bonds: — 

On issues of the Companies $38,420.04 

On 6% 1941 issue of the Commission 7,824.00 

46,244.04 

Proportion of American Exchange on remittance to retire 1921 

bonds 17,907. 84 

Interest on Cash Advances re Third Pipe Line 196,743 . 86 

Other Interest 42,279 . 90 

1,050,083.30 

$2,569,585.74 
Operating Surplus carried to Appropriation Account 549,892. 27 



$3,119,478.01 



THE ONTARIO POWER COMPANY OF NIAGARA FALLS AND 

Appropriation 



Provision for Sinking Funds: 

On $8,000,000 bonds issued by the Commission to cover 
the purchase price of the capital stock of the Power 
Company $100,000.00 

On 6% 1941 bonds to the amount of $3,200,000 issued by 
the Commission for the purpose of retiring the 1921 
bonds of the Power Company 32,000.00 

On Cash Advances re construction of Third Pipe Line. . . . 63,264.36 



195,264.36 



Provision for Interest on $8,000,000 Bond issue of the Com- 
mission $320,000 . 00 

American Exchange thereon 8,076.42 

328,076.42 

Surplus carried forward to Balance Sheet 89,792 . 93 

$613,133.71 






1923 HYDRO-ELECTRIC POWER COMMISSION 289 

THE ONTARIO TRANSMISSION COMPANY, LIMITED 
For Year Ended 31st October, 1922 



Revenue 

Power Sales — 

To Sundry Customers $1,357,119.80 

To Hydro-Electric Power Commission of Ontario for the 
purpose of — 

(a) The Niagara System $1,619,811.49 

(b) St. Catharines and other Municipalities in 

that district 111,792. 11 

(c) The Thorold System 20,905 . 67 

1,752,509.27 

$3,109,629.07 
Miscellaneous Revenue 9,848.94 



$3,119,478.01 



THE ONTARIO TRANSMISSION COMPANY, LIMITED 
Account 



Surplus brought forward, 31st October, 1921 $ 59,197.03 

Operating Surplus for year brought down 549,892. 27 

Profit on Bonds redeemed in the year: 

First Mortgage Bonds of the Power Company ($126,000.00) $3,044.41 

First Mortgage Bonds of the Transmission Company 

($31,000.00) 1,000.00 

4,044.41 



$613,133.71 



10 H.C. 



290 FIFTEENTH ANNUAL REPORT OF THE No. 49 



HYDRO-ELECTRIC POWER 
Account with the Provincial Treasurer 






October 31st, 1922: 

Cheque to cover interest for year ending October 31st, 1922 $5,863,233 .86 

November 1st, 1921, to October 31st, 1922: 

Provincial Expenditures 171,769 .89 

Balance brought forward from October 31st, 1921: 

Being balance of amount expended in connection with 
Radial Railway Surveys and Investigations in 
year ending October 31st, 1921, and carried by 
Commission pending advances from the Province 
out of appropriations as authorized by orders-in- 
council dated October 28th, 1921 $336,995 .70 

Interest at 6.5 per cent on above for one year to October 

31st, 1922 21,904 .72 

358,900.42 

Balance carried down 118,024,532 .23 

$124,418,436.40 



1923 HYDRO-ELECTRIC POWER COMMISSION 291 



COMMISSION OF ONTARIO 

for the Year Ending 31st October, 1922 



November 1st, 1921: 

Balance brought down — 

General Account $39,515,930.33 

Chippawa Development Account 53,040,674.52 

Central Ontario System Account 11,273,712 .78 

$103,830,317.63 

November 1st, 1921, to October 31st, 1922: 
Sundry Cash Advances — 

General Account $5,062,600.00 

Chippawa Development Account 8,237,871 .00 

Central Ontario System Account 834,146 .00 

Provincial Expense Account 230,000 .00 

14,364,617.00 

October 31st, 1922: 

Interest on Balances from November 1st, 1921, to October 

31st, 1922 .. . 6,151,716 .36 

Deferred Interest in respect to Nipigon System for year 

ending October 31st, 1921 71,785 .41 

$124,418,436.40 

November 1st, 1922: 

Balance $118,024,532 .2a 



292 FIFTEENTH ANNUAL REPORT OF THE No. 49 



SECTION X 

MUNICIPAL ACCOUNTS 

The Municipal Accounts section of this report presents the results of the 
operation of the various Hydro systems from a municipal standpoint collect- 
ively and individually. Statements prepared from figures extracted from the 
books of all Hydro municipalities are submitted herein to show how each has 
operated during the past two years; also the financial status at the present 
time; as well as much useful statistical information, all so arranged as to permit 
of comparisons being made between various systems and between different 
municipalities in each system. 

The books of account in all municipalities which have contracted with the 
Hydro-Electric Power Commission of Ontario for a supply of power are kept 
in accordance with the provisions set forth in the publication "Uniform Account- 
ing for Municipal Electric Utilities," issued by the Commission. The Com- 
mission, by a system of periodical inspections and reports, keeps in close touch 
with the operating conditions of each local system. 

During the year 1922, the Uniform Accounting system was installed in the 
following municipalities as each became ready for the service: Alvinston, Ford 
City, Port Perry, Riverside, St. Clair Beach, Tecumseh, Thedford and Uxbridge. 
Periodical inspections were made of the books of all Hydro municipalities, 
and local officials have been assisted in the improvement of their office routine 
with a view to standardizing, as far as possible, the methods employed. In the 
majority of the smaller municipalities, much of the bookkeeping is performed 
by representatives of the Municipal Audit department, in order to insure the 
employment of proper classifications of revenue and expenditures, to save 
time in preparation of reports, to insure compliance with all the requirements 
of the Standard Accounting system, and to make certain that the accounts 
represent as truly as possible the actual operating results for the year. 

The first financial statement in this preface presents consolidated operating 
reports for each year since Hydro was inaugurated and combines the results of 
all the systems. Study of this report will show that the revenue has been in- 
creasing to a most satisfactory degree. The annual surpluses, after providing 
all possible cost of operation, including an adequate depreciation charge, have 
increased until, in 1922, the combined annual surpluses amounted to $696,524.19. 
The second statement presents consolidated balance-sheets for each year 
since 1912, and also shows clearly the march of progress. It is worth noting 
that the total plant value has increased from $10,081,469.16 in 1913 to 
$42,706,840.87 in 1922; and the total assets from $11,907,826.86 to $55,126,- 
834.09. The liabilities have not increased in the same proportion as the assets, 
rising from $10,468,351.79 to $35,196,388.35. The reason for this is that much 
of the cost of the increasing plant value has been financed out of Surplus and 
Reserve accounts without increasing the liabilities of the various systems. By 
this procedure the funds of the systems are used to best advantage. Examina- 
tion of the results will also show that there is a steady decline in the percentage 
of net debt to total assets; being from 88.0 per cent in 1913 to 65.6 per cent in 
1922. The equity in the Hydro-Electric Power Commission System auto- 



1923 HYDRO-ELECTRIC POWER COMMISSION 293 

matically acquired through the inclusion of sinking fund as part of the cost of 
power is not taken into account in arriving at these percentages. 

Combined Balance Sheets: Following "Statement A" are presented 
balance-sheets combining the financial results of the two distinct divisions into 
which, so far as finances are concerned, the whole Hydro-Electric undertakings 
of the municipalities is divided. This matter is referred to at greater length 
on page 190 in the Introduction to Section IX, and information respecting the 
several columns of figures is given in statements immediately preceding these 
balance-sheets. 

The seven statements, "A" to "G," following these two consolidated reports, 
show the results* of operations and the financial status of each municipal system, 
and also give information respecting revenue, number of consumers and con- 
sumption; cost of power to municipalities; power and lighting rates charged to 
consumers, etc. Some of the figures are comparative for the past two years 
and others for all the years of operation. In the statements "A," "B," and "C," 
the figures are arranged in groups under each system and alphabetically for the 
municipalities in each system; in the statements, "D" to "G," all "Hydro" 
municipalities are arranged alphabetically. 

"Statement A" shows comparative balance-sheets for each municipality 
for the past two years, with the plant value sub-divided into the general natural 
sub-divisions specified in the standard accounting system, and there are also 
shown the other items which make up the total assets. It is to be noted that 
among the assets there are items entitled "Equity in Hydro System."" These 
items represent the amount of accumulated Sinking Fund paid by the various 
municipalities through the medium of "Power Cost" toward the ultimate retire- 
ment of the Hydro-Electric Power Commission's construction debt. The total 
accumulation to the end of 1922 is shown on the Consolidated Balance-sheet 
to be $1,543,434.12. 

In each case the balance-sheet is complete and final, including either in 
"Accounts receivable" or "Accounts payable" the adjustments with this Com- 
mission of the differences between the estimated and the actual costs of power. 

The actual liabilities of each local system are set out under their general 
sub-divisions, — debenture balance, accounts payable, bank overdraft, and other 
liabilities, this last account including local debentures issued by municipalities 
to finance ornamental street light systems as local improvements. 

The reserves for depreciation, and the acquired equity in the Hydro-Electric 
Power Commission system, are also listed separately and totalled; and under 
the heading "Surplus" is included not only the free operating profit but the 
accumulation of sinking fund applicable to debenture debt and also the amount 
of debentures already retired out of revenue which properly belong under this 
heading. 

The Depreciation Reserve now amounts to 23.6 per cent of the total de- 
preciable plant, while the Depreciation Reserve and Surplus combined have 
already reached a sum approximating 43.6 per cent of the total plant cost. 

"Statement B" is a consolidated condensed operating report, showing 
the essential figures of each municipal system's operation in such a manner as 
to facilitate a ready comparison of the various results. The population served 
by each system, as well as the number of customers and the load taken in 
December, 1922, are also shown in order to give an idea of the relative sizes of 
the respective utilities. 



294 FIFTEENTH ANNUAL REPORT OF THE No. 49 

Of the 214 municipalities included in this report, a total of 24 failed to meet 
their actual cost of operation without regard to depreciation. A total of 42, 
including the above, failed to provide full theoretical depreciation in addition 
to all operating and maintenance expenses, but their relative unimportance 
is clearly disclosed by an examination of the reports. These 42 municipalities 
indicate a total theoretical loss of $135,004.40, while the remaining 172 muni- 
cipalities piled up a surplus of $830,341.70, thus leaving a net surplus from all 
Hydro municipalities of $695,337.30 during the year. 

* 'Statement C" shows comparative detailed operating reports for each 
utility for 1921 and 1922 where the operation has been for two years and for 
1922 only where the service was inaugurated during that year. The cost of 
power includes the adjustment made by this Commission and hence covers the 
actual cost and not the cost at the interim billed rates. 

"Statement D," in many respects, is the most interesting report in the 
series. It gives more information respecting the actual results of operation 
from the viewpoint of the consumer than is obtainable from the published reports 
of any other, system of electric utilities regardless of where operated or whether 
publicly or privately owned. 

This "Statement D" shows the revenue, kilowatt-hour consumption, number 
of consumers, average monthly consumption, average monthly bill and the net 
average cost per kilowatt-hour both for domestic and for commercial service 
in each municipality since "Hydro" was first installed. For comparative pur- 
poses the rates in effect prior to the installation of "Hydro" are also indicated. 
The average flat-rate cost of horsepower as billed to power customers since 1917 
is also shown. 

In many municipalities the average monthly bill has increased during the 
past two years. This is due to the steady increase in the use of better lighting, 
and the general installation of ranges, heaters and miscellaneous appliances. 
It is estimated that over 26,000 electric ranges are now in use and the number 
is increasing at a rate of over 1,000 per month. In practically all municipalities 
the cost per kilowatt-hour has been steadily declining, due to the constantly 
increasing use of electric appliances, the adoption of a uniform follow-up rate 
of 2 cents for domestic and farm service throughout the province, and the con- 
quently large number of kilowatt-hours consumed at the lower rate. 

"Statement E" shows the installation of street lights in each municipality 
together with the rates set by this Commission, the revenue for 1922 and the 
cost per capita in each municipality. 

"Statement F" and "Statement G" present the local rates in use by 
each utility and also those charged by the Commission on the interim power bills. 

The automatic reduction in the debenture debt, due to the annual principal 
or sinking fund payments being provided for out of revenue, and the remarkable 
accummulation of assets reflect the satisfactory financial condition of the 
Hydro utilities generally. The following tabular statements show in condensed 
form the relation of assets to liabilities in fifty municipalities. In the first 
eighteen municipalities the quick assets such as cash, bonds, accounts receivable 
and inventories exceed in value the total liabilities, including the debenture 
balance, and they may fairly be considered as being out of debt. In the re- 
maining thirty-two municipalities the excess of liabilities over the quick assets 
is relatively so small that a number of them will be transferred to the "out-of- 
debt" list when the books are closed at the end of 1923. 



1923 



HYDRO-ELECTRIC POWER COMMISSION 



295 



Municipality. 



Total 

assets. 



liabilities. 



Total 
quick assets. 



Net balance 

liabilities 

over 

quick assets. 



Excess ol 

quick assets 

over all 

liabilities. 



Acton 

Baden 

Barrie 

Beachville 

Bothwell 

Collingwood . . . 

Creemore 

Elmvale 

Georgetown . . . 
New Toronto . . 

Norwich 

Ridgetown 

Rockwood 

St. George 

Tavistock 

Waterdown .... 

Waterford 

Zurich 

Ailsa Craig. . . 

Brampton 

Cold water 

Delaware 

Dorchester. . . . 

Dresden 

Dutton 

Granton 

Guelph . ; 

Hagersville. . . . 

Ingersoll 

Lucan 

Midland 

Milton 

Mitchell 

Mt. Brydges. . . 

Otterville 

Palmerston .... 

Paris 

Penetang 

Port Credit 

Rodney 

St. Jacobs 

St. Thomas .... 
Seaforth 

Stayner 

Strathroy 

Victoria Harbor 
Wallaceburg. . . 
Waubaushene. . 

West Lome .... 
Woodbridge. . . 



37,938 37 

18,683 87 

212,701 82 

26,627 81 



16,968 99 

158,602 12 
20,813 67 
19,067 20 
71,055 61 

104,822 26 

43,503 17 
53,561 15 
11,065 01 
14,401 64 
27,008 36 

24.045 58 
22,891 92 
12,293 04 

18,158 50 
150,665 11 

18.046 32 
6,022 10 

10,897 30 

31,880 86 

18,020 19 

7,856 12 

487,097 31 

29,162 55 

196,139 68 
26,469 44 

217,973 44 
60,103 10 
63,514 01 

8,828 73 

10,568 81 

46,945 15 

148,613 63 

104,684 92 

25,293 34 
16,311 95 
11,334 24 
433,918 37 
81,229 34 

27,563 20 

95,293 23 

12,592 20 

140,077 88 

7,293 39 

20,692 15 
23,505 30 



$ c. 
5,775 83 
4,615 10 
31,418 72 
5,164 50 
5,889 39 

20,156 89 

4,751 20 

5,674 78 

17,092 91 

18,300 61 

12,144 68 

15,073 44 

678 83 

5,245 12 

3,385 71 

4,573 69 

242 76 

5,233 45 

6,448 66 
53,101 99 
7,448 51 
3,682 58 
3,773 06 

11,055 81 

7,606 32 

3,721 17 

148,929 63 

6,426 62 

87,262 02 

8,761 29 

81,253 83 

16,185 15 

6,928 15 

3,653 53 

3,523 65 

13,848 63 

45,371 36 

33,644 03 

7,089 03 

7,691 76 

5,173 51 

114,578 32 

27.059 86 

10,240 83 

34,963 01 

4,958 96 

68.060 64 
2,701 36 

7,294 15 
8,369 12 



$ c. 

5,941 14 

6,397 11 

70,735 65 

11,359 99 

7,311 73 

35,116 69 

8,529 62 

5,817 70 

22,648 35 

20,140 97 

14,108 68 

20,975 90 

725 13 

7,125 17 

11,930 96 

6,693 80 

3,817 00 

5,254 58 

5,854 93 

39,147 08 

5,645 56 

2,540 00 

2,158 38 

5,081 69 

4,832 08 

2,645 54 

103,781 64 

4,316 58 

56,767 18 

8,634 73 

42,160 39 

14,236 97 

6,277 83 

3,197 79 

3,374 53 

13,828 74 

24,994 40 

23,760 96 

5,279 01 

3,985 58 

4,276 56 

72,069 29 

23,254 42 

6,084 68 

17,979 18 

3,592 50 

42,831 75 

2,303 20 

7,096 46 

7,196 53 



593 73 

13,954 91 

1,802 95 

1,142 58 

1,614 68 

5,974 12 
2,774 24 
1,075 63 
45,047 99 
2,110 04 

30,494 84 

126 56 

39,093 44 

1,948 18 

650 32 

455 74 

194 12 

19 89 

20,376 96 

9,883 07 

1,810 02 

3,706 18 

896 95 

42,509 03 

3,805 44 

4,156 15 
16,983 83 

1,366 46 

25,228 89 

398 16 

197 69 
1,172 69 



$ c 

165 31 

1,782 01 

39,316 93 

6,195 49 

1,422 34 

14,959 80 

3,778 42 

142 92 

5,555 44 

1,840 36 

1,964 00 
5,902 46 
46 30 
1,880 05 
6,545 25 

2,120 11 

3,574 24 

21 13 



A study of these various reports will clearly show that Hydro business in 
general and that of Hydro municipalities in particular are in a most satisfactory 
financial condition. There is no criticism of the working out of the 
economic policies of the Hydro-Electric Power Commission of Ontario which 
cannot intelligently and satisfactorily be met with direct appeal to the official 
figures in the balance sheets and operating reports herein presented. 



296 



FIFTEENTH ANNUAL REPORT OF THE 



No. 49 



CONSOLIDATED 



YEAR. 



1912 



1913 



1914 



1915 



Number of municipalities included. 



Earnings 

Domestic light. . . . 
Commercial light. . 
Commercial power. 
Municipal power. . 

Street light 

Rural 

Miscellaneous 



28 

$ c. 



45 

$ c. 
572,154.38 
525,438.16 
905,378.17 



69 

$ c. 
789,130.81 
673,803.92 
1,214,829.31 



99 

$ c. 
944,271.08 
720,209.26 
1,501,797.78 



560,925.56 
' 53,543 '. 24 



698,409.71 
"57,482 !ii 



835,970.87 
"68,046:29 



Total Earnings. 



1,617,674.00 



2,617,439.51 



3,433,656.16 



4,070,295.28 



and 



Expenses 

Power purchased 

Substation operation 

Substation maintenance 

Distribution system operation 
maintenance 

Line transformer maintenance . . 

Meter maintenance 

Consumers' premises expenses. . 

Street light operation and mainten- 
ance 

Promotion of business 

Billing and collecting 

General office, salaries and expenses 

Undistributed expense 

Interest 

Sinking fund and principal payments 
on debentures 



789,632.87 
78,394.81 
18,698.46 

104,114.51 

8,547.61 

5,222.19 

53,108.38 

84,903.76 
72,303.51 
77,351.76 

154,932.69 
65,423.64 

528,549.21 



1,045,752.65 
97,658.90 
31,790.99 

130,998.65 

11,764.32 

9,536.07 

65,192.23 

113,047.80 
86,683.02 

103,560.71 

230,899.75 
89,350.91 

662,092.34 



1,485,614.72 

107,607.31 

25,935.56 

154,409.71 
11,508.92 
12,899.14 
47,494.26 



136,983 
74,402 
131,541 
236,777 
129,209 
817,978, 



Total expenses, 



1,377,168.00 



2,041,183.40 



2,678,328.34 



3,371,414.00 



Surplus 

Depreciation charge 



240,506.00 
124,992.47 



576,256.11 
262,675.24 



755,327.82 
357,883.31 



698,881.28 
414,506.99 



Surplus less depreciation , 



115,513.53 



313,580.87 



397,444.51 



284,374.29 



*Debenture payments included in "Interest." 



1923 



HYDRO-ELECTRIC POWER COMMISSION 



297 



OPERATING REPORT 



1916 


1917 


1918 


1919 


1920 


1921 


1922 


128 

$ c. 
1,172,878.96 
812,130.78 
1,921,152.31 


143 

$ c 
1,417,460.31 
899,023.72 
2,665,280.65 


166 

$ c. 
1,632,272.12 
968,399.42 
3,417,248.37 


181 

S c 
1,991,632.31 
1,175,143.56 
3,443,107.13 


186 

$ c. 

2,546,345.30 

1,512,854.63 

3,752,188.22 

532,279.09 

1,005,535.11 

168,919.95 

189,778.63 


205 

3,149,080.03 

1,851,501.76 

3,895,437.46 

654,531.01 

1,060,357.77 

145,566.57 

225,467.70 


214 

$ c. 

3,786,608.23 

2,158,306.34 

4,383,912.97 

973,263.38 


930,057.48 


967,495 . 10 


902,875.55 


988,900.95 


1,160,446.81 
105,877.09 


147,381.50 


120,805.39 


161,243.70 


228,270.65 


187,689.39 


4,983,601.03 


6,070,065.17 


7,082,039.16 


7,827,054.60 


9,707,900.93 


10981942.30 


12,756,104.21 


1,959,446.83 

153,761.08 

46,131.53 

154,247.17 
14,528.17 
24,218.48 
52,602.01 

145,471.50 
79,324.85 

154,508.58 

306,709.35 
97,333.97 

951,781.99 

* 


2,563,880.17 

203,091.20 

42,129.04 

169,326.24 
25,328.95 
44,461.55 
61,765.14 

157,857.73 
73,516.37 
188,083.84 
349,932.05 
102,938.80 
1,085,180.80 

* 


2,807,769.33 

238,257.34 

60,805.92 

223,347.81 
30,488.83 
63,155.56 
65,149.59 

196,157.18 
64,962 . 78 
208,660.76 
421,680.15 
117,474.07 
1,238,425.53 

* 


3,284,490.68 

217,638.89 

81,853.63 

286,310.76 
42,509.12 
78,726.64 
84,301.24 

215,963.86 
77,789.22 
236,504.75 
452,131.22 
190,690.09 
1,285,571.51 

* 


4,216,667.87 
285,407.35 
102,050.81 

344,551.57 

46,323.09 

123,701.18 

116,283.52 

236,930.79 
78,294.85 
295,942.88 
559,695.29 
256,400.33 
1,431,807.16 

* 


4,876,650.31 
314,838.35 
104,798.01 

487,918.33 

65,088.46 

116,722.97 

134,854.92 

297,481.52 
101,804.46 
321,685.71 
656,268.11 
308,874.42 
998,611.47 

532,183.96 


6,636,853.37 
315,443.70 
100,763.67 

519,252.16 

52,932.26 

107,806.88 

143,388.88 

297,363.86 
129,932.63 
338,153.50 
605,852.50 
385,895.03 
1,074,657.44 

635,469.90 


4,140,065.51 


5,077,491.08 


5,736,334.85 


6,531,481.61 


8,094,056.69 


9,317,781.00 


11,343,765.78 


843,535.52 
486,141.80 


992,574.09 
607,296.29 


1,345,704.31 
718,162.30 


1,295,572.99 
814,219.37 


1,613,844.24 
902,028.75 


1,664,161.30 
1,044,434.85 


1,412,338.43 
715,814.24 


357,393.72 


385,367.80 


627,542.01 


481,353.62 


711,815.49 


619,726.45 


696,524.19 



298 



FIFTEENTH ANNUAL REPORT OF THE 



No. 49 



CONSOLIDATED 



YEAR 



1913 



1914 



1915 



1916 



Number of municipalities included. 



Assets 

Lands and buildings 

Substation equipment 

Distribution system — overhead. . . . 
Distribution system — underground. . 

Line transformers 

Meters 

Street lighting equipment — regular. . 
Street light equip. — ornamental. . . . 

Miscellaneous constr. expenses 

Steam or hydraulic plant 

Old plant 



Total plant 

Bank and cash balance 

Securities and investments 

Accounts receivable 

Inventories 

Sinking fund on local debentures. 

Equity in Hydro system 

Other assets 



Total assets. 



Liabilities 

Debenture balance 
Accounts payable . . 
Bank overdraft. . . . 
Other liabilities. . . 



Total liabilities. 



Reserves 

For depreciation 

For equity in H.E.P.C. system, 



Total reserves. 



Surplus 

Debentures paid 

Local sinking fund 

Additional operating surplus , 



45 

$ c 
626,707.34 
,090,875.69 
,690,834.74 
644,514.24 
615,546.20 
840,606.64 
900,614.80 
62,765.34 
866,551.89 
,401,175.28 
341,277.00 



69 

$ c. 

791,732.20 

1,476,087.84 

3,422,763.93 

807,153.53 

787,613.52 

1,172,475.11 

1,071,255.37 

270,386.55 

2,062,035.90 

420,108.33 

619,513.12 



99 

$ c 

873,838.18 

1,582,062.56 

4,234,626.05 

928,420.77 

981,754.70 

1,418,165.08 

1,309,628.49 

197,644.82 

1,701,182.66 

461,651.60 

1,184,372.86 



128 



1,335,936.33 

1,934,626.12 

4,832,353.27 

1,095,709.62 

1,179,132.07 

1,711,299.49 

1,251,057.13 

306,388.95 

2,059,263.42 

864,500.01 

759,748.66 



10,081,469.16 
450,887.97 



12,901,125.40 
422,350.12 



14,873,347.77 
284,653.96 



17,330,015.07 
1,061,029.90 



344,487.95 
540,274.58 
431,747.27 



561,873.08 
615,226.76 
625,217.03 



602,920.69 
726,556.76 
868,983.78 



695,152.23 

764,504.59 

1,166,017.73 



58,959.93 



123,410.97 



326,801.11 



342,215.87 



11,907,826.86 



15,249,203.36 



17,683,264.07 



21,358,935.39 



8,711,308.37 

1,553,711.45 

160,919.16 

42,412.81 



10,678,078.36 

1,682,150.29 

228,622.50 

113,838.66 



11,831,811.03 

2,040,038.01 

292,106.44 

37,388.31 



15,058,641.57 
969,187.75 
178,413.26 
491,874.90 



10,468,351.79 



12,702,689.81 



14,201,343.79 



16,698,117.48 



478,145.88 



850.618.07 



1,337.739.73 



1,843,804.68 



478,145.88 



850,618.07 



1,843,804.68 



202,751.26 
431,747.27 
326,830.66 



320,129.10 
625,217.03 
750,549.35 



394,466.22 
868,983.78 
880,730.55 



549,778.59 
1,165,785.94 
1,101,448.70 



Total surplus 

Total liabilities, reserves and surplus. 
Percentage of net debt to total assets 



961,329.19 



1,695,895.48 



2,144,180.55 



2,817,013.23 



11,907,826.86 



15,249,203.36 



17.683,264.07 



21,358,935.39 



83.3 



80.3 



78.4 



1923 



HYDRO-ELECTRIC POWER COMMISSION 



299 



BALANCE SHEET 



1917 



143 

$ c 

1,546,241.41 

2,471,293.82 

6,080,073.42 

1,157,059.90 

1,483,839.44 

1,999,095.48 

1,237,734.69 

361,975.74 

2,184,015.84 

896,753.20 

649,852.51 



1918 



20,077,935.45 
340,026.50 



1,285,097.33 
1,261,398.36 
1,337,578.96 



125,240.05 



166 

$ c 
1,859,888.69 
2,820,448.70 
6,627,237.39 
1,216,288.59 
1,772,691.35 
2,238,143.70 
1,200,625.65 

531,502.61 
2,395,096.50 

214,575.75 
1,476,413.00 



1919 



22,352,951.93 
391,194.91 



1,124,018.44 

972,996.96 

1,663.298.05 



444.787.63 



191 

$ c. 

1,995,545.83 

2,915,125.56 

7,445,820.31 

1,206,296. 

2,073,113.45 

2,587,566.32 

1,206,638.71 

546,497 . 68 

2,530,101.08 

986,200.57 

805,959.89 



1920 



24,298,866.28 

462,437.23 

627,076.53 

1,921,166.69 

1,032,569.75 

1,925,455.77 

369,071.89 

86,216.05 



195 

$ c. 

2,175,568.24 

3,231,050.80 

8,579,881.49 

1,313,369.29 

2,560,581.59 

3,053,135.20 

1,269,006.98 

557,678.13 

2,697,636.12 

757,194.47 

864,298.39 



1921 



27,059,400.70 

•943,858.12 

341,855.88 

2,022,538. 

1,400,671.89 

2,244,004.34 

577,584.06 

25,447.07 



215 

3,230,985.63 

5,403,689.90 

8,397,361.48 

1,401,135.97 

3,077,649.83 

3,552,076.79 

1,335,997.13 

610,586.70 

3,030,134.16 

704,848.46 

912,388.55 



1922 



31,656,854.60 

900,842.34 

556,608.53 

2,148,287.05 

1,504,596.28 

2,541,718.35 

795,570.51 

78,929.84 



226 

$ c. 
3,334,522.68" 
5,046,857.98 
11,165,330.24 
1,598,053.02 
3,618,684.73 
4,033,689.52 
1,419,016.05 

666,084.50 
3,261,495.74 

565,158.54 
7,997,947.87 



42,706,840.87 
1,164,336.24 

443,938.18 
3,874,317.14- 
1,738,795.96 
3,416,231.45 
1,543,434.12 

238,940.13 



24,427,276.65 



26,949,247.92 



30,722,860 19 



34,615,360.94 



40,111,979 23 



55,126,834 09" 



15,593,773.61 

1,537,669.11 

886,177.94 

429,104.20 



17,209,217.70 

1,007,727.79 

576,816.49 

350.013.21 



18,133,462.44 

1,420,926.66 

403,235.57 

670,271.90 



19,268,072.04 

1,840,137.54 

514,671.99 

642,293.65 



21,619,220.99 

1,887,567.93 

989,099.98 

938,368.84 



30,454,186.12 

3,699,292.52 

456,706.69 

586,203.02 



18,446,724.86 



19,143,775.19 



20,627,896.57 



22,265,175.22 



25,434,257.74 



35,196,388.35 



2,463,723.83 



3,133,550.17 



3,750,162.28 
373,871.89 



4,788,645.03 
577,584.06 



5,491,858.93 
800,249.05 



6,512,813.92 
1,543,434.12 



2,463,723.83 



3,133,550.17 



4,124,034.17 



5,366,229.09 



6,292,107.98 



,056,248.04 



694,797.90 
1,340,615.38 
1,481,414.68 



920,076.56 
1,662,602.69 
2,089,243.31 



1,328,657.68 
1,754,020.37 
2,888,251.40 



1,440,157.52 
2,246,474.47 
3,297,325.64 



1,860,079.53 
2,541,718.35 
3,983,815.63 



3,104,591.15 
3,416,231.45 
5,353,375.10 



3,516,827.96 



4,671,922.56 



5,970,929.45 



6.983,956.63 



,385,613.51 



11,874,197.70^ 



24,427,276.65 26,949,247.92 



75.5 



71.0 



30,722,860.19 



67.9 



34,615,360.94 



65.4 



40,111,979.23 



64.7 



55.126.834.09 



65.6 



300 



FIFTEENTH ANNUAL REPORT OF THE 



No. 49 



STATEMENT 
Comparative Balance Sheets of Electrical Departments 






NIAGARA 
SYSTEM 



Municipality 
Population 


Acton 
1,742 


Ailsa Craig 

547 


Alvinston 
659 




1921 


1922 


1921 


1922 


1922 


Assets 

Lands and buildings 


$ c. 
1,500.00 

597.62 
9,917.78 


$ c. 

1,545.45 

597.62 

10,674.47 


$ c. 


$ c. 


$ c. 


Substation equipment 








Distribution system, overhead.. . . 
Distribution system, underground 


6,559.22 


6,559.22 


13,103.30 


Line transformers 


3,648.03 
4,113.28 
1,041.02 


5,215.98 
5,006.60 
1,071.18 


2,020.97 

1,688.01 

362.97 


2,020.97 

1,699.09 

362.97 


3,186.71 
2,788 . 73 
1,052.29 


Meters 


Street light equipment, regular. . . 
Street light equip., ornamental. . . 


Misc. construction expense 

Steam or hydraulic plant 


1,512.29 


1,360.89 


492.36 


492.36 


890.68 


Old plant 


3,481.50 


3,481.50 






1,185.00 








Total plant 


25,811.52 

1,234.84 

3,000.00 

1,017.85 

955.10 


28,953.69 

922.18 
2,000.00 
1,281.67 
1,737.29 


11,123.53 

1,326.40 

2,000.00 

622.18 


11,134.61 

3,640.85 

2,000.00 

214.08 


22,206.71 
1,878.61 


Bank and cash balance 


Securities and investments 


Accounts receivable 




Inventories 


18 83 


Sinking fund on local debentures. 








Equity in Hydro systems 

Other assets 


1,822.04 


3,043.54 


322.53 


1,168.96 


26.58 














Total assets 


33,841.35 


37,938.37 


15,394.64 


18,158.50 


24,130.73 


Deficit 


262 99 














Total 


33,841.35 


37,938.37 


15,394.64 


18,158.50 


24,393.72 




Liabilities 

Debenture balance 


6,027.21 
82.00 


5,646.50 
129.33 


6,458.14 
331.45 


6,302.26 
146.40 


1,875.57 


Accounts payable 


22,237.90 


Bank overdraft 




Other liabilities 
























Total liabilities 


6,109.21 


5,775.83 


6,789.59 


6,448.66 


24,113.47 






For depreciation 


5,339.84 
1,822.04 


5,892.34 
3,043.54 


2,094.00 
322.53 


2,314.00 
1,168.96 




For equity in H.E.P.C. system. . . 


26.58 


Total reserves 


7,161.88 


8,935.88 


2,416.53 










Surplus 

Debentures paid 


8,472.79 


8,853.50 


424.50 


580.38 


253.67 


Local sinking fund 




Additional operating surplus 


12,097.47 


14,373.16 


5,764.02 


7,646.50 






Total surplus 


20,570.26 


23,226.66 


6,188.52 


8,226.88 


253.67 






Total liabilities, reserves & surplus 


33,841.35 


37,938.37 


15,394.64 


18,158.50 


24,393.72 


Per cent of net debt to total assets. 


18.0 


16.6 


44.1 


38.0 


100.0 






1923 



HYDRO-ELECTRIC POWER COMMISSION 



301 



of Hydro Municipalities as at December 31, 1922 



Ancaster Township 


Aylmer 
2,251 


Ayr 
817 


Baden Police Village 


1921 


1922 


1921 


1922 


1921 


1922 


1921 


1922 


$ c. 


$ c. 


$ c. 


$ c. 


$ c. 
125.00 


$ c. 
125.00 


$ c. 

660.64 


$ c. 
660 . 64 












14,679.75 


15,333.76 


15,080.80 


15,803.88 


6,533.25 


6,770.51 


4,495.58 


4,517.59 


3,630.52 

5,388.68 

626.81 


4,238.77 

6,003.06 

626.81 


3,976.48 
5,720.13 
1,124.55 


4,535.16 
6,402 . 89 
1,124.55 


1,428.39 

1,585.59 

360.27 


1,428.39 

1,995.56 

360.27 


1,815.52 

1,290.53 

370.02 


1,815.52 

1,691.88 

370.02 


1,147.70 


1,147.70 


1,051.86 


1,051.86 


785.49 


785.49 
















14,719.17 


14,719.17 


4,006.03 


4,005.53 














25,473.46 


27,350.10 


41,672.99 

2,286.73 

6,000.00 

301.42 

19.40 


43,637.51 

615.29 

9,000.00 

1,856.67 

82.40 


14,824.02 

160.88 
1,000.00 
1,486.21 

100.11 


15,470.75 

886 07 
1,000.00 
1,520.03 

107.95 


8,632.25 
2,888.77 


9,055.65 
6,315.96 






346.69 


90.03 


2,818.80 

■77.25 


53.55 
27.60 








849.44 


976.28 




517.59 


458.30 


909.01 


1,945.89 


3,231.11 


















26,669.59 


28,416.41 


50,280.54 


55,709.46 


18,029.52 


19,893.81 


16,362.96 


18,683.87 




















28,416.41 


50,280.54 




18,029.52 


19,893.81 


16,362.96 


18,683.87 


16,557.04 
85.00 


16,315.43 

455.46 

1,043.81 


31,848.92 
136.72 


31,138.55 
90.76 


8,118.50 


7,442.03 
10.06 


4,053.42 


3,930.83 
684.27 


2,122.30 






































18,764.34 


17,814.70 


31,985.64 


31,229.31 


8,118.50 


7,452.09 


4,053.42 


4,615.10 


2,221.00 
849.44 


2,918.00 
976.28 


2,891.38 


3,545.38 
517.59 


2,935.00 
458.30 


3,262.00 
909.01 


2,112.52 
1,945.89 


2,373.52 
3,231.11 








3,070.44 


3,894.28 


2,891.38 


4,062.97 


3,393.30 


4,171.01 


4,058.41 


5,604.63 


442.96 


684.57 


6,853.00 


7,563.37 


4,384.88 


5,061.35 


946.58 


1,069.17 


4,391.85 


6,022.86 


8,550.52 


12,853.81 


2,132.84 


3,209.36 


7,304.55 


7,394.97 


4,834.81 


6,707.43 


15,403.52 


20,417.18 


6,517.72 


8,270.71 


8,251.13 


8,464.14 


26,669.59 


28,416.41 


50,280.54 


55,709.46 


18,029.52 


19,893.81 


16,362.96 


18,683.87 


70.3 


65.0 


63.4 


56.5 


45.0 


39.2 


24.8 


29.8 



302 



FIFTEENTH ANNUAL REPORT OF THE 



No. 49 



STATEMENT 
Comparative Balance Sheets of Electrical Departments 



NIAGARA 
SYSTEM— Continued 



Municipality- 
Population 


Barton Township 


Beachville, 


Police Vil. 


Belle River 
580 




1921 


1922 


1921 


1922 


1922 


Assets 

Lands and buildings 


$ c. 


$ c. 


$ c. 
161.03 


$ c. 
176.13 


$ c. 


Substation equipment 








Distribution system, overhead.. . . 




42,639.98 


7,061.22 


7,256.07 


8,123.23 


Distribution system, underground 
Line transformers 






5,962.69 

11,513.41 

212.01 


1,714.74 

1,559.10 

287.10 


1,714.74 
1,781.26 

355.87 


1,853.20 

1,058.01 

631 92 


Meters 




Street light equipment, regular. . . 




Street light equip., ornamental. . . 






Misc construction expense 




2,545.60 


533.36 


533.36 


517 05 


Steam or hydraulic plant . 






Old plant 
























Total plant 


37,984.07 

3,472.87 

18,000.00 

1,821.63 


62,873.69 

2,275.21 
7,000.00 


11,316.55 

2,252.27 

9,000.00 

129.86 

146.57 


11,817.43 

1,743.66 
9,000.00 

525.27 
91.06 


12,183.41 


Bank and cash balance 




Securities and investments 




Accounts receivable 


1,811.59 






Sinking fund on local debentures. 








Equity in Hydro systems . . . 






2,057.29 


3,450.39 




Other assets 






5.00 














Total assets 


61,278.57 


72,148.90 
4,139.07 


24,902.54 


26,627.81 


14,000 00 


Deficit .... 














Total 


61,278.57 


76,287.97 


24,902.54 


26,627.81 


14,000.00 






Liabilities 

Debenture balance 


50,002.91 
7,493.37 


48,150.70 
20,381.31 


4,363.83 

885.77 


4,233.43 
931.07 


9,000 00 


Accounts payable 




Bank overdraft .... 




Other liabilities 
























Total liabilities 


57,496.28 


68,532.01 


5,249.60 


5,164.50 


9,000.00 






For depreciation 




2,484.00 


3,740.00 
2,057.29 


4,019.50 
3,450.39 


5,000.00 


JFor equity in H.E.P.C. system. . 














Total reserves 




2,484.00 


5,797.29 












Surplus 

Debentures paid 


1,202.79 


5,271.96 


989.17 


1,119.57 




Local sinking fund 




Additional operating surplus 


2,579.50 




12,866.48 


12,873.85 








Total surplus 


3,782.29 


5,271.96 


13,855.65 


13,993.42 








Total liabilities, reserves & surplus 


61,278.57 


76,287.97 


24,902.54 


26,627.81 


14,000.00 


Per cent of net debt to total assets. 


93.8 


94.9 


21.0 


22.2 


64.2 



: 



923 



HYDRO-ELECTRIC POWER COMMISSION 



303 



"A"- Continued 

of Hydro Municipalities as at December 31, 1922 



Blenheim 
1,580 


Bolton 
658 


Bothwell 
613 


Brampton 
4,407 


1921 


1922 


1921 


1922 


1921 


1922 


1921 


1922 


$ c. 


$ c. 


$ c. 


$ c. 


$ c. 


$ c. 


$ c. 

3,854.06 

8,968.83 

37,141.76 


$ c. 
3,854.06 


909 64 


909.64 
14,348.17 










8,968.83 


13,916.57 


9,357.30 


9,474.99 


3,497.71 


3,692.12 


38,397.13 


5,322.33 
4,751.15 
1,122.43 
1,492.13 
602.17 


5,438.02 
5,290.29 
1,171.87 
1,492.13 
602.17 


5,816.65 

2,493.64 

561.14 


5,816.65 

2,641.54 

561.14 


1,269.52 

1,923.55 

3.26.10 


1,299.02 

2,146.58 

332.95 


13,395.45 

13,573.50 

2,106.16 


14,682.67 

14,841.43 

2,167.44 


982.60 


982.60 


501.90 


501.90 


3,056.51 


3,056.51 






1,554.60 


1,554.60 






15,000.00 


15,000.00 












28,116.42 


29,252.29 


20,765.93 


21,031.52 


7,518.78 

455.13 

2,000.00 

753.93 

47.35 


7,972.57 

2,597.12 
2,000.00 
1,657.60 


97,096.27 

973.15 

33,276.00 

1,152.97 

310.30 


100,968.07 
6,498.84 










31,985.26 


513.20 
217 84 


1,320.49 
88.00 


233.50 


163.58 


246.64 
416 34 










677.84 


1,777.10 


931.08 


1,761.92 


3,014.90 
1,584.61 


1,684.69 
1,057.01 


6,425.03 


10,549.96 














29,525.30 


32,437.88 


21,930.51 
2,369.47 


22,957.02 

2,527.25 


15,374.70 


16,968.99 


139,233.73 


150,665.11 














29,525.30 


32,437.88 


24,299.98 


25,484.27 


15,374.70 


16,968.99 


139,233.72 


150,665.11 


12,764.78 


12,513.58 

2,000.00 

660.72 

1,482.97 


10,962.24 
2,795.98 
4,006.62 


10,654.47 
3,943.64 
2,658.41 


4,558.84 


4,469.13 
363.25 


50,251.94 
1,754.81 


47,736.29 
5,365.70 


3,584.65 
1,482.97 






1,584.61 


1,057.01 














17,832.40 


16,657.27 


17,764.84 


17,256.52 


6,143.45 


5,889.39 


52,006.75 


53,101.99 


4,867.00 
677.84 


5,132.70 
1,777.10 


4,066.30 
931.08 


4,620.30 
1,761.92 


2,160.34 
3,014.90 


2,248.29 
1,684.69 


30,826.97 
6,425.03 


32,058.97 
10,549.96 


5,544.84 


6,909.80 


4,997.38 


6,382.22 


5,175.24 


3,932.98 


37,252.00 


42,608.93 


1,235.22 


1,486.42 


1,537.76 


1,845.53 


975.35 


1,065.06 


18,798.70 


21,314.35 


4,912.84 


7,384.39 






3,080.66 


6,081.56 


31,176.27 


33,639.84 






6,148.06 


8,870.81 


1,537.76 


1,845.53 


4,056.01 


7,146.62 


49,974.97 


54,954.19 


29,525.30 


32,437.88 


24,299.98 


25,484.27 


15,374.70 


16,968.99 


139,233.72 


150,665.11 


60.3 


54.3 


73.0 


81.4 


39.7 


38.6 


37.3 


37.9 



304 



FIFTEENTH ANNUAL REPORT OF THE 



No. 49 



STATEMENT 
Comparative Balance Sheets of Electrical Departments 



NIAGARA 

SYSTEM— Continued 



Municipality 
Population 


Brantford 
31,362 


Brantford Township 


Brigden 




1921 


1922 


1921 


1922 


1921 


Assets 
Lands and buildings 


$ c. 

33,810.81 

93,903.12 

156,667.59 


$ c. 

36,029.62 

107,829.95 

170,410.18 


$ c. 


$ c. 


$ c. 
101 03 


Substation equipment .' 


902.33 
30,147.88 


1,297.71 
36,453.17 




Distribution system, overhead.. . . 
Distribution system, underground 
Line transformers 


5,400.55 


63,445.60 
69,334.32 
20,169.87 
34,014.54 
28,204.78 


75,093.73 
76,994.06 
21,896.53 
34,014.54 
29,078.59 


8,031.08 
6,083.50 
1,555.34 


10,057.35 
6,776.02 
1,977.76 


1,122.63 


Meters 


1,360.69 


Street light equipment, regular. . . 
Street light equip., ornamental. . . 


223.35 


Misc. construction expense 

Steam or hydraulic plant 


2,973.27 


3,435.61 


850.83 


Old plant 










1,381.00 














Total plant 


499,550.63 
3,359.24 


551,347.20 
7,971.72 


49,693.40 
3,014.86 


59,997.62 
2,393.40 


10,440.08 
1,347.58 


Bank and cash balance 


Securities and investments 




Accounts receivable 


6,870.38 

825.49 

60,840.28 

5,674.15 


10,004.04 

943.45 

70,494 . 89 

21,906.91 


1,552.25 
167.48 
360.36 


1,634. 8i 
248.78 
580.99 


791.11 


Inventories 


34.29 


Sinking fund on local debentures . 

Equity in Hydro systems 

Other assets 
























Total assets 


577,120.18 


662,668.21 


54,788.35 
1,313.00 


64,855.60 
1,555.53 


12,613.06 


Deficit 












Total 


577,120.18 


662,668.21 


56,101.35 


66,411.13 


12,613.06 




Liabilities 

Debenture balance 


377,500.00 
15,620.68 


398,750.00 
6,850.93 


45,006.34 
1,290.71 


51,194.25 
2,429.69 


4,339.33 


Accounts payable 


2,552.56 


Bank overdraft 




Other liabilities 


2,333.00 


40,675.50 
















Total liabilities 


395,453.68 


446,276.43 


46,297.05 


53,623.94 


6,891.89 






Reserves 

For depreciation 


68,152.90 
5,674.15 


78,209.68 
21,906.91 


5,243.96 


6,274.79 


982.00 


For equity in H.E.P.C. system. . . 










Total reserves 


73,827.05 


100,116.59 


5,243.96 


6,274.79 


982.00 






Surplus 

Debentures paid 




6,250.00 
70,494.89 
39,530.30 


4,199.98 
360.36 


5,931.41 
580.99 


3,660.67 


Local sinking fund 


60,840.28 
46,999.17 




Additional operating surplus 


1,078.50 








Total surplus 


107,839.45 


116,275.19 


4,560.34 


6,512.40 


4,739.17 






Total liabilities, reserves & surplus 


577,120.18 


662,668.21 


56,101.35 


66,411.13 


12,613.06 


Per cent of net debt to total assets. 


68.5 


75.4 


82.5 


82.6 


54.0 



1923 



HYDRO-ELECTRIC POWER COMMISSION 



305 



"A"— Continued 

of Hydro Municipalities as at December 31, 1922 



Police Village 


Burford Police Village 


Burgessville 


Police Vil. 


Caledonia 
1,335 


1922 


1921 


1922 


1921 


1922 


1921 


1922 


$ c. 
101 03 


$ c. 
202.00 


$ c. 
202.00 


$ c. 


$ c. 


$ c. 


$ c. 












5,448.50 


4,921.25 


5,424.76 


2,i79.73 


2,191.96 


7,125.68 


7,554.03 


1,122.63 

1,446.50 

223.35 


1,137.08 

1,710.03 

282.02 


1,176.96 

2,090.81 

282.02 


567.81 
569.66 
156.07 


567.81 
606 . 14 
156.07 


1,304.57 

1,783.48 

605.89 


1,304.57 

2,063.21 

662.35 


850.83 


671.00 


671.00 


453.00 


453.00 


473.20 


473.20 


1,381.00 




























10,573.84 
683 66 


8,923.38 
70 39 


9,847.55 
580 58 


3,926.27 
417 98 


3,974.98 
1,171.28 


11,292.82 
1,337.27 


12,057.36 

171.73 
1,000.00 


942 . 73 


220.00 
29.77 


999.42 


865.60 






108 69 




8.75 
















203.42 


283.82 


709.09 




137.37 


569.67 


866 07 




32.52 
















12,403.65 


9,527.36 
276.17 


12,136.64 


5,242.37 


5,292.38 


13,199.76 


14,203.85 














12,403.65 


9,803.53 


12,136.64 


5,242.37 


5,292.38 


13,199.76 


14,203.85 


3,712.67 
1,832.27 


3,768.83 
2,897.29 


3,575.84 
2,613.68 


2,835.67 


2,700.62 
229.61 


3,916.58 

35.88 


3,789.86 
70 
































5,544.94 


6,670.54 


6,189.52 


2,835.67 


2,930.23 


3,952.46 


3,790.56 


1,185.00 
203 42 


1,618.00 
283.82 


1,856.00 
709.09 


801.00 


891.30 
137.37 


2,666.76 
569.67 


2,904.76 
866.07 








1,388.42 


1,901.82 


2,565.09 


801.00 


1,028.67 


3,236.43 


3,770.83 


4,287.33 


1,231.17 


1,424.16 


664.33 


799.38 


707.42 


834.14 


1,182.96 




1,957.87 


941.37 


534.10 


5,303.45 


5,808.32 








5,470.29 


1,231.17 


3,382.03 


1,605.70 


1,333.48 


6,010.87 


6,642.46 


12,403.65 


9,803.53 


12,136.64 


5,242.37 


5,292.38 


13,199.76 


14,203.85 


45.5 


68.0 


54.1 


54.0 


56.9 


29.9 


28.4 



306 



FIFTEENTH ANNUAL REPORT OF THE 



No. 49 



STATEMENT 
Comparative Balance Sheets of Electrical Departments 



NIAGARA 
SYSTEM— Continued 



Municipality 
Population 


Chatham 
15,084 


Chippawa 
1,029 


Clinton 
1,941 




1921 


1922 


1921 


1922 


1921 


Assets 

Lands and buildings 


$ c. 
39,013.28 
46,123.86 
95,734.86 


$ c. 

39,351.72 

51,254.64 

104,296.57 


$ c. 


$ c. 


$ c. 


Substation equipment 






7,738.47 


Distribution system, overhead. . . . 
Distribution system, underground 


11,755.22 


12,173.03 


14,364.10 


Line transformers 


49,826.94 
50,361.08 
7,853.65 
26,907.19 
23,420.52 


58,781.42 
54,022.80 
7,853.65 
26,907.19 
30,390.39 


1,819.08 

1,671.65 

509.78 


2,270.32 
1,981.90 

518.78 


3,503.27 

4,838.85 


Meters 


Street light equipment, regular. . . 
Street light equip., ornamental. . . 

Misc. construction expense 

Steam or hydraulic plant 


907.82 


794.52 


794.52 


3,312.45 


Old plant 


22,940.00 


27,328.85 






10,784.59 










Total plant 


362,181.38 
50.00 


400,187.23 
50.00 


16,550.25 
86.86 


17,738.55 
169.96 


45,449.55 


Bank and cash balance 


3,707.94 


Securities and investments 


Accounts receivable 


47,286.72 
28,140.01 


47,807.30 
27,188.36 


821.19 


946.06 


578.81 


Inventories 


2,554.72 


Sinking fund on local debentures. 






7,419.74 


Equity in Hydro systems 

Other assets 


3,125.62 


13,292.48 




240.71 


1,213.75 


















Total assets 


440,783.73 


488,525.37 


17,458.30 


19,095.28 


60,924.51 


Deficit 
















Total 


440,783.73 


488,525.37 


17,458.30 


19,095.28 


60,924.51 






Liabilities 


296,854.25 
22,377.56 
22,229.38 


273,966.34 

49,083.57 

30,295.46 

1,986.00 


12,917.12 
1,571.29 


12,543.09 
617.67 




Debenture balance 


40,500.00 


Accounts payable. . . . 




Bank overdraft 




Other liabilities. . 




157.28 












Total liabilities 


341,461.19 


355,331.37 


14,488.41 


13,318.04 


40,500.00 






For depreciation 


36,940.00 
3,125.62 


44,267.00 
13,292.48 


941.76 


1,123.66 
240.71 


8,116.00 


For equity in H.E.P.C. system. . . 


1,213.75 






Total reserves 


40,065.62 


57,559.48 


941.76 


1,364.37 


9,329.75 






Surplus 

Debentures paid 


18,121.65 


22,668.87 


432.88 


806.91 




Local sinking fund 


7,419.74 


Additional operating surplus 


41,135.27 


52,965.65 


1,595.25 


3,605.96 


3,675.02 


Total surplus 


59,256.92 


75,634.52 


2,028.13 


4,412.87 


11,094.76 






Total liabilities, reserves & surplus 


440,783.73 


488,525.37 


17,458.30 


19,095.28 


60,924.51 


Per cent of net debt to total assets. 


77.4 


74.8 


83.0 


70.6 


66.4 



923 



HYDRO-ELECTRIC POWER COMMISSION 



307 



4 ■ A"— Continued 

of Hydro Municipalities as at December 31, 1922 



Clinton 


Comber Police Village 


Dashwood Police Village 


Delaware Police Village 


1922 


1921 


1922 


1921 


1922 


1921 


1922 


$ c. 


$ c. 


$ c. 


$ c. 


$ c. 


$ c. 


$ c. 


7,544.43 














.15,196.21 


4,398.98 


4,642.29 


1,828.02 


1,828.02 


2,177.09 


2,206.59 


4,900.12 

5,317.45 

907.82 


2,395.14 

1,286.45 

199.55 


2,542.72 

1,433.24 

199.55 


953.68 
884.50 
189.00 


953.68 
886.30 
277.22 


216.75 
503 . 14 
106.93 


216.75 
568.02 
106.93 


3,406.50 


957.54 


957.54 


291.87 


291.87 


203.81 


203.81 


10,736.09 




























48,008.62 
3,713.50 


9,237.66 
1,218.26 


9,775.34 


4,147.07 
240.76 


4,237.09 
1.40 


3,207.72 
283.20 


3,302.10 
615 11 








267.05 
2,665.12 


19.25 

58.44 


19.25 
105.15 


25.24 


5.24 


1,505.60 


1,924.89 


8,392.23 










2,475.36 


368.01 


956.46 




138.31 


73.12 


180 00 




















65,521.88 


10,901.62 
1,640.41 


10,856.20 


4,413.07 


4,382.04 


5,069.64 


6,022.10 














65,521.88 


12,542.03 


10,856.20 


4,413.07 


4,382.04 


5,069.64 


6,022.10 


40,500.00 
369.30 


6,225.17 
3,055.02 


5,898.12 

172.36 

13.73 


3,138.38 
116.59 


3,076.77 
20.39 


3,509.71 
154.27 


3,424.98 
257.60 




























40,869.30 


9,280.19 


6,084.21 


3,254.97 


3,097.16 


3,663.98 


3,682.58 


8,991.00 
2,475.36 


1,419.00 
368.01 


1,646.00 
956.46 


633.00 


701.13 
138.31 


734.00 
73.12 


828.00 
180 00 








11,466.36 


1,787.01 




633.00 


839.44 


807.12 


1,008.00 




1,474.83 


1,801.88 


261.62 


323.23 


490.29 


575 02 


8,392.23 




4,793.99 




367.65 


263.48 


122 21 


108.25 


756 50 








13,186.22 


1,474.83 


2,169.53 


525.10 


445.44 


598.54 


1,331.52 


65,521.88 


12,542.03 


10,856.20 


4,413.07 


4,382.04 


5,069.64 


6,022.10 


65.0 


73.9 


61.4 


73.7 


74.7 


72.2 


63.2 



308 



FIFTEENTH ANNUAL REPORT OF THE 



No. 49 



STATEMENT 
Comparative Balance Sheets of Electrical Departments 



NIAGARA 
SYSTEM— Continued 



Municipality 
Population 


Dereham Township 


Dorcheste 


r Police V. 


Drayton 
618 




' 1921 


1922 


1921 


1922 


1921 


Assets 

Lands and buildings 


$ c. 


$ c. 


$ c. 


$ c. 


$ c. 


Substation equipment 












Distribution system, overhead.. . . 
Distribution system, underground 
Line transformers 


9,500.75 


9,358.70 


3,356.54 


3,774.28 


5,760.05 


11,317.74 
3,012.84 


11,531.75 
3,172.30 


1,964.01 

1,357.42 
212.34 


2,509.68 

1,607.07 

212.34 


1,480.35 


Meters. 

Street light equipment, regular. . 


1,821.29 
567 13 


Street light equip., ornamental. . . 








Misc. construction expense 

Steam or hydraulic plant 


483.26 


494.46 


328.41 


328.41 


388.37 


Old plant 
























Total plant 


24,314.59 
627.03 


24,557.21 
1,523.58 


7,218.72 
321.72 


8,431.78 
1,505.54 


10,017.19 


Bank and cash balance 


2,404.38 


Securities and investments. . . 




Accounts receivable 


300.00 


409.09 


973.81 


652.84 


122.02 


Inventories 




Sinking fund on local debentures. 












Equity in Hydro systems 

Other assets 


2,096.72 


2,882.42 


151.24 


307.14 


















Total assets 


27,338.34 
4,214.19 


29,372.30 
5,198.37 


8,665.49 


10,897.30 


12,543.59 


Deficit 












Total 


31,552.53 


34,570.67 


8,665.49 


10,897.30 


12,543.59 


Liabilities 
Debenture balance 


20,703.38 
4,445.43 


20,001.12 
5,719.96 


3,859.78 
36.91 


3,773.06 


8,960.35 


Accounts payable 




Bank overdraft 






Other liabilities 
























Total liabilities 


25,148.81 


25,721.08 


3,896.69 


3,773.06 


8,960.35 






Reserves 
For depreciation 


4,307.00 
2,096.72 


5,264.91 
2,882.42 


1,446.70 
151.24 


1,639.70 
307.14 


1,427.00 


For equity in H.E.P.C. system. . . 






Total reserves 


6,403.72 


8,147.33 


1,597.94 


1,946.84 


1,427.00 






Surplus 

Debentures paid 




702.26 


440.22 


526.94 


539.65 


Local sinking fund 






Additional operating surplus .... 






2,730.64 


4,650.46 


1,616.59 










Total surplus 




702.26 


3,170.86 


5,177.40 


2,156.24 








Total liabilities, reserves & surplus 


31,552.53 


34,570.67 


8,665.49 


10,897.30 


12,543.59 


Per cent of net debt to total assets. 


92.0 


97.1 


44.9 


35.6 


71.5 



1923 



HYDRO-ELECTRIC POWER COMMISSION 



309 



4 ' A "—Continued 

of Hydro Municipalities as at December 31, 1922 



Drayton 


Dresden 
1,456 


Drumbo Police Village 


Dublin Police Village 


1922 


1921 


1922 


1921 


1922 


1921 


1922 


$ c. 


$ c 


$ c. 


$ c. 


$ c. 


$ c. 
85.00 


$ c. 
85.00 




523.00 
8,391.39 


523.00 
9,690.73 








5,931.33 


2,825.45 


3,041.57 


4,010.35 


4,046.00 


1,787.93 

1,957.17 

567.13 


3,887.44 

4,073.30 

828.62 


4,979.13 

4,237.41 

828.62 


457.46 
913.68 
129.89 


457.46 
932.05 
201.80 


660.75 
520.46 
417.71 


660.75 
520.46 
417.71 


388.37 


408.09 


408.09 


235.58 


235.58 


762.41 


787.06 




4,815.26 


4,815.01 




















10,631.93 

1,482.53 
2,000.00 


22,927.10 
2,770.49 


25,481.99 
4,015.94 


4,562.06 

217.86 
600.00 
375.10 


4,868.46 

263.79 

600.00 

873.68 

2.40 


6,456.68 

48.18 


6,516.98 
130.86 


361.24 


1,681.29 
1,229.38 


182.14 
883.61 


168.05 
39.55 


157.36 
39.55 








146.63 


366.75 


1,317.18 


237.45 


393.45 




79 15 






















14,622.33 


28,975.01 


31,880.86 


5,992.47 


7,001.78 


6,712.46 
1,061.58 


6,923.90 
1,050.65 














14,622.33 


28,975.01 


31,880.86 


5,992.47 


7,001.78 


7,774.04 


7,974.55 


8,822.61 


11,850.79 


11,055.81 


3,948.51 
20.00 


3,853.20 


5,348.14 
692.04 


5,106.08 
671.40 








































8,822.61 


11,850.79 


11,055.81 


3,968.51 


3,853.20 


6,040.18 


5,777.48 


1,683.00 
146.63 


3,604.00 
366.75 


3,921.00 
1,317.18 


1,030.00 
237.45 


1,161.00 
393.45 


882.00 


1,024.00 
79.15 








1,829.63 


3,970.75 


5,238.18 


1,267.45 


1,554.45 


882.00 


1,103.15 


677.39 


4,387.46 


5,182.44 


551.49 


646.80 


851.86 


1,093.92 


3,292.70 


8,766.01 


10,404.43 


205.02 


947.33 












3,970.09 


13,153.47 


15,586.87 


756.51 


1,594.13 


851.86 


1,093.92 


14,622.33 


28,975.01 


31,880.86 


5,992.47 


7,001.78 


7,774.04 


7,974.55 


61.0 


40.8 


36.2 


66.3 


58.2 


90.1 


85.8 



310 



FIFTEENTH ANNUAL REPORT OF THE 



No 49 



STATEMENT 
Comparative Balance Sheets of Electrical Departments 



NIAGARA 
SYSTEM— Continued 



Municipality 
Population 


Dundas 
5,100 


Dunnville 

3,583 


Dutton 
845 




1921 


1922 


1921 


1922 


1921 


Assets 

Lands and buildings 


$ c. 

8,519.52 

6,624.07 

44,822.49 


$ c 

8,519.52 

6,745.29 

45,826.38 


$ c. 

3,379.78 

16,916.68 

25,659.26 


$ c. 

3,379.78 

16,916.68 

26,348.79 


$ c. 


Substation equipment 




Distribution system, overhead.. . . 
Distribution system, underground 


6,571.24 


Line transformers 


12,435.36 

14,815.28 
1,736.00 


13,678.83 

15,758.24 
1,736.00 


7,507.59 
5,385 . 18 
2,320.25 
4,767.47 
4,852.51 


9,630.95 
6,201.44 
2,320.25 
4,767.47 
4,988.29 


2,032.78 

2,643.61 

513.51 


Meters 


Street light equipment, regular . . . 
Street light equip., ornamental. . . 


Misc. construction expense 

Steam or hydraulic plant 


6,041.84 


7,175.84 


288.17 


Old plant 


1,867.38 


1,867.38 


10,717.62 


10,717.62 








Total plant 


96,861.94 
2,654.72 


101,307.48 
5,101.36 


81,506.34 


85,271.27 


12,049.31 


Bank and cash balance 


1,740.45 


Securities and investments 






2,000 00 


Accounts receivable 


2,635.53 
1,748.53 


1,307.56 
3,341.36 


2,025.65 
759.76 


2,960.33 
599.87 


31.29 


Inventories 


217.60 


Sinking fund on local debentures . 




Equity in Hydro systems 


5,012.03 


9,359.88 




749.44 


287.89 


Other assets. . . 


















Total assets 


108,912.75 


120,417.64 


84,291.75 


89,580.91 


16,326.54 


Deficit 
















Total 


108,912.75 


120,417.64 


84,291.75 


89,580.91 


16,326.54 






Liabilities 

Debenture balance 


44,971.55 
1,764.92 


43,791.37 
4,638.76 


61,395.21 
9,844.11 
1,258.70 


60,320.43 
6,532.03 
1,517.33 


7,785.74 


Accounts payable 




Bank overdraft 




Other liabilities 




















Total liabilities 


46,736.47 


48,430.13 


72,498.02 


68,369.79 


7,785.74 


Reserves 

For depreciation 

For equity in H.E.P.C. system. . . 


27,714.13 
5,012.03 


27,182.06 
9,359.88 


7,079.56 


8,716.56 
749.44 


2,515.00 
289.89 






Total reserves 


32,726.16 


36,541.94 


7,079.56 


9,466.00 


2,802.89 






Surplus 

Debentures paid 


8,028.45 


9,208.63 


4,104.79 


5,179.57 


621.75 


Local sinking fund . . 




Additional operating surplus 


21,421.67 


26,236.94 


609.38 


6,565.55 


5,116.16 


Total surplus 


29,450.12 


35,445.57 


4,714.17 


11,745.12 


5,737.91 






Total liabilities, reserves & surplus 


108,912.75 


120,417.64 


84,291.75 


89,580.91 


16,326.54 


Per cent of net debt to total assets. 


42.9 


43.5 


86.0 


77.0 


47.7 



1923 



HYDRO-ELECTRIC POWER COMMISSION 



" A"— Continued 

of Hydro Municipalities as at December 31, 1922 



Dutton 


Elmira 
2,370 


Elora 
1,091 


Embro 
463 


1922 


1921 


1922 


1921 


1922 


1921 


1922 


$ c. 


$ c. 
3,837.29 


$ c. 
4,396.24 


$ c. 


$ c. 


$ c. 


$ c. 












6,718.72 


15,141.97 


16,917.74 


11,267.83 


11,873.35 


5,789.81 


5,873.51 


2,039.78 

2,708.45 

516.26 


5,525.68 

5,902.29 

713.14 


7,161.75 

6,791.44 

865.76 


4,733.89 

3,070.86 

501.34 


4,847.63 

3,540.77 

501.34 


1,236.92 

1,161.49 

209.29 


1,775.29 

1,271.59 

209 . 29 


288.17 


2,359.90 


2,129.07 


926.18 


926.18 


69.45 


69.45 




2,325.08 


2,325.08 


1,425.47 


1,425.47 


429.25 


429.25 






12,271.38 

3,047.38 

1,500.00 

112.65 


35,805.35 
1,135.68 


40,587.08 
1,100.68 


21,925.57 
324.53 


23,114.74 
1,343.50 


8,896.21 

248.55 
1,000.00 


9,628.38 

2.27 
1,000.00 


1,984.97 
1,642.63 


1,548.71 
2,051.04 


1,195.03 

878.77 


1,734.98 
704.00 




172.05 


31.82 








916.73 


1,880.69 


3,511.03 


1,443.90 


2,751.15 


662.38 


1,142.99 
















18,020.19 


42,449.32 


48,798.54 


25,767.80 


29,648.37 


10,838.96 
2,006.60 


11,773.64 
1,031.37 














18,020.19 


42,449.32 


48,798.54 


25,767.80 


29,648.37 


12,845.56 


12,805.01 


7,606.32 


17,496.15 


17,092.94 


10,519.05 


10,097.03 


7,079.99 

2,322.18 


6,850.91 
1,646.63 








































7,606.32 


17,496.15 


17,184.94 


10,519.05 


10,097.03 


9,402.17 


8,497.54 


2,852.00 
916.73 


7,471.00 
1,880.69 


8,009.39 
3,511.03 


4,794.00 
1,443.90 


5,443.90 
2,751.15 


2,361.00 
662.38 


2,515.39 
1,142.99 


3,768.73 






6,237.90 


8,195.05 




3,658.38 


801.17 


2,503.85 


2,907.06 


2,480.95 


2,902.97 


420.01 


649.09 


5,843.97 


13,097.63 


17,186.12 


6,529.90 


8,453.32 












6,645 . 14 


15,601.48 


20,093.18 


9,010.85 


11,356.29 


420.01 


649.09 


18,020.19 


42,449.32 


48,798.54 


25,767.80 


29,648.37 


12,845.56 


12,805.01 


44.4 


41.2 


37.9 


40.8 


37.5 


86.7 


79.9 



312 



FIFTEENTH ANNUAL REPORT OF THE 



No. 49 



STATEMENT 
Comparative Balance Sheets of Electrical Departments 



NIAGARA 
SYSTEM— Continued 



Municipality 
Population 


Etobicoke Township 


Exeter 
1,507 


Fergus 

1,762 




1921 


1922 


1921 


1922 


1921 


Assets 

Lands and buildings 


$ c. 


$ c. 


$ c 


$ c. 

2,319.50 


$ c. 


Substation equipment 










Distribution system, overhead.. . . 
Distribution system, underground 
Line transformers 


45,656.59 


69,211.75 


13,004.36 


14,004.07 


15,553.46 


13,064.56 

17,469.36 

2,076.11 


20,253.14 

25,653.72 

3,818.23 


3,418.11 

4,108.96 

732.08 


3,877.91 

4,412.75 

828.13 


5,602.98 
5,563.45 


Meters 


Street light equipment, regular . . . 
Street light equip., ornamental . . . 


1,249.57 


Misc. construction expense 

Steam or hydraulic plant. . . . 


3,342.10 


2,918.86 


1,549.48 


1,559.48 


645.37 


Old plant 










2,546.59 












Total plant 


81,608.72 


121,855.70 
50.00 


22,812.99 

4,324.90 
3,000.00 
1,451.31 
1,899.86 


27,001.84 

134.66 
3,000.00 
3,321.54 
2,015.62 


31,161.42 


Bank and cash balance 




Securities and investments 






Accounts receivable 


7,790.44 
283.77 


3,085.33 
576.66 


440.37 


Inventories 


4,694.88 


Sinking fund on local debentures. 




Equity in Hydro systems 

Other assets 


5,611.05 


7,924.87 
105.40 




3,069.88 


1,072.85 














Total assets 


95,293.98 


133,597.96 


33,489.06 


38,543.54 


37,369.52 


Deficit 
















Total 


95,293.98 


133,597.96 


33,489.06 


38,543.54 


37,369.52 






Liabilities 


41,158.81 


69,617.84 
1,150.95 
4,079.21 
1,003.25 


17,149.70 
1,120.95 


16,588.13 
1,699.96 




Debenture balance 


14,173.94 


Accounts payable 


1,107.75 


Bank overdraft 


10,136.64 
519.50 


9,976.41 


Other liabilities 
















Total liabilities 


51,814.95 


75,851.25 


18,270.65 


18,288.09 


25,258.10 






Reserves 

For depreciation 


19,154.82 
5,611.05 


22,686.82 
7,924.87 


3,964.00 


4,406.20 
3,069.88 


5,090.00 


For equity in H.E.P.C. system. . . 


1,072.85 






Total reserves 


24,765.87 


30,611.69 


3,964.00 


7,476.08 


6,162.85 






Surplus 

Debentures paid 


4,841.19 


6,382.16 


2,850.35 


3,411.92 


1,826.06 


Local sinking fund 




Additional operating surplus 


13,871.97 


20,752.86 


8,404.06 


9,367.45 


4,122.51 


Total surplus 


18,712.16 


27,135.02 


11,254.41 


12,779.37 


5,948.57 






Total liabilities, reserves & surplus 


95,293.98 


133,597.96 


33,489.06 


38,543.54 


37,369.52 


Per cent of net debt to total assets. 


54.3 


60.4 


54.5 


51.5 


67.7 



1923 



HYDRO-ELECTRIC POWER COMMISSION 



313 



" A "—Continued 

of Hydro Municipalities as at December 31, 1922 



Fergus 


Ford City 
5,113 


Forest 
1,422 


Gait 
13,332 


Georgetown 
2,098 


1922 


1922 


1921 


1922 


1921 


1922 


1921 


1922 


$ c. 


$ c. 


$ c. 
4,500.00 


$ c. 
5,276.15 


$ c. 
134,697.10 
108,663.85 
163,173.28 


$ c. 
192,108.00 
132,295.63 
179,834.45 


$ c. 
12.00 


$ c 
12.00 








16,633.58 


40,431.14 


12,162.06 


13,212.84 


20,530.84 


20,972.24 


7,637.33 
6,543.98 
1,249.57 


16,744.01 
15,010.87 


2,761.27 
5,888.36 
1,824.15 


3,319.88 
6,271.31 
1,967.89 


34,962.04 
46,543.51 
9,198.82 
62,842.77 
16,942.05 


39,749.01 
48,982.34 
10,727.88 
59,985.10 
27,230.98 


7,466.81 
6,826.26 
1,058.68 


7,639.13 
7,615.42 
1,108.60 




660.37 


362.28 


303.85 


342.85 


1,458.15 


1,509.08 


2,546.59 




11,084.87 


11,084.87 






2,209.80 


2,209.80 










35,271.42 


72,548.30 


38,524.56 

459.71 
2,000.00 

447.01 
4,376.77 


41,475.79 

1,489.05 
2,000.00 
2,406.61 
3,168.28 


577,023.42 

25.00 
350.00 

203,243.32 

35,536.21 

66,629.05 

19,217.32 

2,281.67 


690,913.39 

175.00 
650.00 
52,211.40 
23,957.22 
76,203.24 
32,525.95 
883.63 


39,562.54 

224.64 

15,064.63 

2,580.44 

1,160.20 


41,066.27 

3,129.29 

14,953.36 

3,133.57 

1,432.13 






5,464.51 
2,869.99 


2,294.22 






2,195.05 






347.98 


5,413.08 


7,340.99 


99.96 


















45,900.93 


74,842.52 


45,808.05 


50,887.71 


904,305.99 


877,519.83 


64,005.53 


71,055.61 


















45,900.93 




45,808.05 


50,887.71 


904,305.99 


877,519.83 


64,005.53 


71,055.61 


13,852.61 
459.00 


63,000.00 
7,312.68 


25,611.24 
270.12 


24,172.18 
1,369.89 


388,579.18 

3,859.04 

232,649.78 


387,565.04 

133,406.51 

55,221.59 

1,500.00 


17,496.12 


17,092.91 


14,878.57 
































29,190.18 


70,312.68 


25,881.36 


25,542.07 


625,088.00 


577,693.14 


17,496.12 


17,092.91 


5,875.00 
2,195.05 


2,877.17 


4,208.00 


4,381.97 
347.98 


75,610.58 
19,217.32 


82,288.81 
32,525.95 


12,365.63 
5,413.08 


13,487.93 
7,340.99 








8,070.05 


2,877.17 


4,208.00 


4,729.95 


94,827.90 


114,814.76 


17,778,71 


20,828.92 


2,147.39 




8,788.76 


10,227.82 




5,436.91 
103,371.78 


2,503.88 


2,907.09 






117,761.04 




6,493.31 


1,652.67 


6,-929.93 


10,387.87 


26,226.82 


30,226.69 


8,640 . 70 


1,652.67 


15,718.69 


20,615.69 


184,390.09 


185,011.93 


28,730.70 


33,133.78 


45,900.93 


74,842.52 


45,808.05 


50,887.71 


904,305.99 


877,519.83 


64,005.53 


71,055.61 


66.9 


94.0 


56.5 


50.6 


69.2 


68.4 


27.4 


26.8 



314 



FIFTEENTH ANNUAL REPORT OF THE 



No. 49 



STATEMENT 
Comparative Balance Sheets of Electrical Departments 



NIAGARA 
SYSTEM— Continued 



Municipality 
Population 


Glencoe 

835 


Goderich 
4,108 


Grantham 




1921 


1922 


1921 


1922 


1921 


Assets 

Lands and buildings 


$ c. 


$ c. 


$ c. 

12,915.81 

9,795.28 

37,174.31 


$ c. 

12,957.48 

9,795.28 

41,065.90 


$ c. 


Substation equipment 








Distribution system, overhead.. . . 
Distribution system, underground 
Line transformers 


14,073.20 


14,402.51 


8,410.77 


2,674.83 
2,352.99 
1,630.56 


2,846.37 
2,722.97 
1,630.56 


10,407.39 

10,481.96 

4,231.71 


11,598.20 

11,506.40 

4,244 . 76 


4,282.71 


Meters 


1,934.80 


Street light equipment, regular. . . 
Street light equip., ornamental. . . 




Misc. construction expense 

Steam or hydraulic plant. . 


2,991.70 


3,179.01 


4,005.81 


4,016.70 


267.30 


Old plant 






14,622 . 15 


14,622.15 












Total plant 


23,723.28 
1,452.20 


24,781.42 
1,559.50 


103,634.42 
3,671.23 


109,806.87 


14,895.58 


Bank and cash balance. . 


807.60 


Securities and investments. . . 






Accounts receivable 


489.52 
132.87 
660.28 


1,204.01 


7,105.53 

827.00 

4,513.23 

4,449.46 


10,262.48 
2,030.00 
4,809.66 
8,143.96 


2,928.11 


Inventories 




Sinking fund on local debentures . 
Equity in Hydro systems 


1,188.50 
155.21 


1,847.68 
3,569.57 


Other assets 


















Total assets 


26,458.15 


28,888.64 


124,200.87 


135,052.97 


24,048.54 


Deficit 


58.97 














Total 


26,458.15 


28,888.64 


124,200.87 


135,052.97 


24,107.51 






Liabilities 

Debenture balance 


19,596.65 
1,749.42 


19,052.03 
697.21 


41,521.68 
11,443.26 


39,184.51 

14,969.36 

1,447.46 


10,793.72 


Accounts payable 


5,774.36 


Bank overdraft. . 




Other liabilities 






















Total liabilities 


21,346.07 


19,749.24 


52,964.94 


55,601.33 


16,568.08 






Reserves 

For depreciation 


806.00 


1,259.00 
155.21 


25,420.00 
4,449.46 


28,049.00 
8,143.96 


1,915.90 


For equity in H.E.P.C. system. . . 


3,569.57 








Total reserves 


806.00 


1,414.21 


29,869.46 


36,192.96 


5,485.47 






Surplus 

Debentures paid 


516.23 

660.28 

3,129.57 


1,060.85 

1,188.50 
5,475.84 


14,566.37 

4,513.23 

22,286.87 


16,903.54 

21,545.48 


206.28 


Local sinking fund 




Additional operating surplus 






Total surplus 


4,306.08 


7,725.19 


41,366.47 


43,258.68 


2,053.96 


Total liabilities, reserves & surplus 


26,458.15 


28,888.64 


124,200.87 


135,052.97 


24,107.51 


Per cent of net debt to total assets. 


80.5 


68.8 


42.8 


43.8 


68.8 



923 



HYDRO-ELECTRIC POWER COMMISSION 



315 



" A "— Continued 

of Hydro Municipalities as at December 31, 1922 



Township 


Granton Police Village 


Guelph 
18,027 


Hagersville 
1,271 


1922 


1921 


1922 


1921 


1922 


1921 


1922 


$ c. 


$ c. 


$ c. 


$ c. 
12,004.40 
80,154.72 
98,491.64 


$ c. 

12,004.40 

81,167.10 

107,601.34 


$ c. 


$ c. 








833.52 
12,145.20 


833.52 


9,140.73 


3,065.64 


3,100.64 


12,592.63 


4,687.85 
2,291.01 


623.16 
908.55 
149.27 


623.16 
908.55 
149.27 


50,534.80 
46,647.51 
28,404.89 


56,241.03 
48,861.51 
30,681.34 


2,768.60 

4,261.59 

608.30 


2,879.21 

4,331.37 

608.30 






267.30 


110.28 


110.28 


11,950.43 


13,172.74 


140.20 


140.20 






























16,386.89 
633.04 


4,856.90 
1,313.65 


4,891.90 
2,497.32 


328,188.39 


349,729.46 

62.50 
25,000.00 
22,033.33 
30,955.26 
21,264.55 
33,586.21 
4,466.00 


20,757.41 

240.54 

4,500.00 

1,946.94 

92.45 


21,385.23 
56.42 




5,000.00 

27,658.69 

34,070.32 

. 19,573.79 

17,731.62 


2,000.00 


2,853.33 


291.92 


148.22 


2,180.91 
79.25 


2,190.95 








4,221.57 




318.68 


1,303.07 


3,460.74 




















26,285.78 


6,462.47 


7,856.12 


432,260.31 


487,097.31 


28,840.41 


29,162.55 
















26,285.78 


6,462.47 


7,856.12 


432,260.31 


487,097.31 


28,840.41 


29,462.55 


10,681.99 
5,957.33 


3,191.19 
580.03 


3,128.39 
592.78 


95,884.91 
18,550.40 
12,531.67 


93,079.38 

30,877.06 

23,957.33 

915.86 


6,645.16 
4,330.64 


6,426.62 




























16,639.32 


3,771.22 


3,721.17 


126,966.98 


148,829.63 


10,975.80 


6,426.62 


2,847.90 
4,221.57 


949.00 


1,082.00 
318.68 


70,247.76 
17,731.62 


71,041.97 
33,586.21 


869.98 
1,303.07 


323.44 
3,460.74 








7,069.47 


949.00 


1,400.68 


87,979.38 


104,628.18 


2,173.05 


3,784.18 


318.01 
2,190.95 


308.81 


371.61 


49,115.08 

19,573.79 

148,625.08 


51,920.61 

21,264.55 

160,454.34 


1,354.84 


1,573.38 


68.03 


1,433.44 


2,362.66 


14,336.72 


17,378.37 


2,576.99 


1,742.25 


2,734.27 


217,313.95 


233,639.50 


15,691.56 


18,951.75 


26,285.78 


6,462.47 


7,856.12 


432,260.31 


487,097.31 


28,840.41 


29,162.55 


75.4 


58.3 


49.3 


29.4 


32.8 


38.1 


25.0 



316 



FIFTEENTH ANNUAL REPORT OF THE 



No. 49 



STATEMENT 
Comparative Balance Sheets of Electrical Departments 



NIAGARA 
SYSTEM— Continued 



Municipality 
Population 


Hamilton 
118,243 


Harriston 
1,311 


Hensall 
738 




1921 


1922 


1921 


1922 


1921 


Assets 

Lands and buildings 


$ c. 
102,950.78 
150,916.97 
496,895.62 
182,013.14 
219,842.43 
252,317.69 
96,923.91 


$ c. 
170,721.82 
153,702.90 
583,755.83 
184,371.80 
250,391.36 
281,884.27 
101,873.59 


$ c. 


$ c. 


$ c. 


Substation equipment 


600.00 
8,806.06 


600.66 
9,238.70 




Distribution system, overhead.. . . 
Distribution system, underground 
Line transformers 


6,811.02 


3,762.20 

3,456.55 

350.00 


3,762.20 

3,683.22 

350.00 


2,250.85 


Meters 


1,928.71 


Street light equipment, regular. . . 
Street light equip., ornamental. . . 


436.67 


Misc. construction expense 

Steam or hydraulic plant . . 


143,356.86 


141,027.72 


458.07 


458.07 


447.50 


Old plant 






1,130.83 


1,130.83 


400.00 










Total plant 


1,645,217.40 


1,867,729.29 
119,081.21 


18,563.71 


19,223.02 
139.73 


12,274.75 


Bank and cash balance. . 


2,066.35 


Securities and investments 






Accounts receivable 


179,456.99 
91,235.96 

207,194.80 

51,280.92 

4,645.35 


184,106.98 

92,042.30 

238,251.14 

115,574.00 

3,844.57 


2,385.96 
3,104.86 


2,308.38 
598.17 


74.00 


Inventories 


20.00 


Sinking fund on local debentures. 




Equity in Hydro systems 

Other assets 




1,306.13 
















Total assets 


2,179,031.42 


2,620,629.49 


24,054.53 
986.67 


23,575.43 


14,435.10 


Deficit 


246.83 












Total 


2,179,031.42 


2,620,629.49 


25,041.20 


23,575.43 


14,681.93 






Liabilities 

Debenture balance 


996,537.12 

120,607.21 

251,428.79 

31,705.70 


1,489,920.31 
191,988.85 


10,711.78 
6,607.20 
2,713.97 


9,470.62 

3,476.35 


11,116.72 


Accounts payable 


385.93 


Bank overdraft 




Other liabilities 


50,062.01 














Total liabilities 


1,400,278.82 


1,731,971.17 


20,032.95 


12,946.97 


11,502.65 






For depreciation 


353,718.56 
♦56,062.92 


378,583.02 
115,574.00 


2,402.00 


3,387.40 
1,306.13 


2,296.00 


For equity in H.E.P.C. system. . . 








Total reserves 


409,781.48 


494,157.02 


2,402.00 


4,693.53 








Surplus 

Debentures paid 


23,462.88 
207,194.80 
138,313.44 


30,079.69 
238,251.14 
126,170.47 


2,606.25 


3,847.41 


883.28 


Local sinking fund 




Additional operating surplus 




2,087.52 








Total surplus 


368,971.12 


394,501.30 


2,606.25 


5,934.93 


883.28 






Total liabilities, reserves & surplus 


2,179,031.42 


2,620,629.49 


25,041.20 


23,575.43 


14,681.93 


Per cent of net debt to total assets. 


64.3 


69.1 


83.2 


58.2 


78.4 



Includes $4,782.00 Reserve for Insurance. 



923 



HYDRO-ELECTRIC POWER COMMISSION 



317 



" A "— Continued 

of Hydro Municipalities as at December 31, 1922 



Hensall 


Hespeler 
2,853 


Highgate 
417 


Ingersoll 
5,253 


1922 


1921 


1922 


1921 


1922 


1921 


1922 


$ c. 


$ c. 

3,504.43 

8,507.47 

17,858.88 


$ c. 

3,521.37 

12,917.81 

20,884.18 


$ c. 


$ c. 


$ c. 

6,357.57 

10,302.31 

38,535.91 


$ c. 
6,357.57 








10,302.31 


6,933.32 


3,640.97 


3,878.07 


40,568.97 


2,250.85 

2,286.92 

436.67 


9,149.16 
7,523.93 
1,572.22 


9,415.26 
8,879.19 
1,578.22 


1,488.37 

1,124.45 

294.56 


1,488.37 

1,200.60 

294.56 


12,458.77 

17,504.67 

2,739.29 

4,597.59 

8,629.55 


14,354.72 

18,588.61 

2,762.09 

4,597.59 


447.50 


93.08 


623.33 


476.51 


476.51 


8,517.40 


400.00 


2,230.00 


1,817.50 






20,607.25 


20,389.38 










12,755.26 
2,957.53 


50,439.17 


59,636.86 

375.34 
559.89 
936.06 


7,024.86 
696.91 


7,338.11 
1,811.51 


121,732.91 


126,438.64 




1,088.09 
481.09 


20,500.00 

22,105.55 
1,304.87 

22,650.57 
7,978.83 


20,500.00 


15.14 


307.50 

87.47 


140.81 
38.03 


7,190.08 
3,546.24 




3,045.33 




25,530.86 


979.35 


4,866.18 




358.35 


12,933.86 






















16,707.28 
424.04 


55,053.68 


66,374.33 


8,116.74 


9,686.81 


196,272.73 


196,139.68 
















17,131.32 


55,053.68 


66,374.33 


8,116.74 


9,686.81 


196,272.73 


196,139.68 


10,875.15 
1,606.52 


15,264.21 

761.73 

4,080.52 


28,878.71 
4,572.21 


4,584.15 


4,488.11 


79,800.00 
2,510.22 

8,883.37 


79,800.00 








2,864.43 
























12,481.67 


20,106.46 


33,450.92 


4,584.15 


4,488.11 


95,791.18 


87,262.02 


2,545.45 
979.35 


10,127.76 
3,045.33 


3,713.05 
4,866.18 


1,056.00 


1,232.00 
358.35 


20,139.63 
7,978.83 


20,361.77 
12,933.86 








3,524.80 




8,579.23 


1,056.00 




28,118.46 


33,295.63 


1,124.85 


17,306.30 


18,691.80 


415.85 


511.89 








49,712.52 






4,467.83 


5,652.38 


2,060.74 


3,096.46 


50,051.17 






1,124.85 


21,774.13 


24,344.18 


2,476.59 


3,608.35 


72,363.09 


75,582.03 


17,131.32 


55,053.68 


66,374.33 


8,116.74 


9,686.81 


196,272.73 


196,139.68 


79.4 


36.6 


54.4 


56.5 


48.2 


48.7 


47.6 



318 



FIFTEENTH ANNUAL REPORT OF THE 



No. 49 



STATEMENT 
Comparative Balance Sheets of Electrical Departments 



NIAGARA 
SYSTEM— Continued 


Municipality 
Population 


Kitchener 
22,717 


Lambeth Police Vil. 


Listowel 
2,429 




1921 


1922 


1921 


1922 


1921 


Assets 

Lands and buildings. . . . 


$ c 

46,364.28 

117,036.88 

132,947.30 

9,444.68 

74,881.00 

84,368.77 

25,789.11 


$ c 
46,676.23 
117,591.71 
149,459.27 
13,008.52 
85,165.98 
92,240.20 
26,280.22 


$ c 


$ c. 


$ c. 
1,229.07 


Substation equipment 






Distribution system, overhead.. . . 
Distribution system, underground 
Line transformers 


2,911.58 


4,979.89 


25,765.67 


288.86 

1,129.02 

159.37 


657.71 

1,515.55 

167.40 


11,929.62 
9,334.60 
1,238.10 
5,780.22 
1,362.71 


Meters 


Street light equipment, regular . . . 
Street light equip., ornamental 


Misc. construction expense 

Steam or hydraulic plant. . 


9,334.03 


9,477.77 


214.73 


300.71 


Old plant 


52,536.31 


52,498.91 






4,750.70 








Total plant 


552,602.36 

733.66 
31,440.00 
20,686.50 
14,729.57 


592,398.81 

2,047.78 
22,000.00 
23,757.75 
14,956.21 


4,703.56 
1,808.81 


7,621.26 
126.33 


61,390.69 
1,860.95 


Bank and cash balance 


Securities and investments 


Accounts receivable 


77.33 


1,081.71 


5,286.47 
180.00 


Inventories 


Sinking fund on local debentures. 






Equity in Hydro systems 

Other assets 


33,460.08 


61,218.73 


155.50 


382.77 


















Total assets 


653,652.17 


716,379.28 


6,745.20 


9,212.07 


68,718.11 


Deficit 














Total 


653,652.17 


716,379.28 


6,745.20 


9,212.07 


68,718.11 




Liabilities 

Debenture balance 


193,733.03 
45,144.18 
14,504.35 


184,081.14 
81,317.17 
22,834.27 


3,647.08 
290.60 


3,571.01 
1,123.34 


33,723.05 
6,936.43 


Accounts payable 


Bank overdraft 


Other liabilities 






5,742.30 












Total liabilities 


253,381.56 


288,232.58 


3,937.68 


4,694.35 


46,401.78 




For depreciation 


117,678.28 
33,460.08 


121,223.00 
61,218.73 


1,066.68 
155.50 


1,226.68 

382.77 


7,515.00 


For equity in H.E.P.C. system. . . 




Total reserves 


151,138.36 


182,441.73 


1,222.18 




7,515.00 




Surplus 

Debentures paid 


106,416.97 


116,068.86 


352.92 


428.99 


9,466.84 


Local sinking fund. 


Additional operating surplus 


142,715.28 


129,636.11 


1,232.42 


2,479.28 


5,334.49 


Total surplus 


249,132.25 


245,704.97 


1,585.34 


2,908.27 


14,801.33 




Total liabilities, reserves & surplus 


653,652.17 


716,379.28 


6,745.20 


9,212.07 


68,718.11 


Per cent of net debt to total assets. 


38.7 


44.0 


58.4 


53.2 | 


67.5 



1923 



HYDRO-ELECTRIC POWER COMMISSION 



319 



" A "— Continued 

of Hydro Municipalities as at December 31, 1922 



Listowel 


London 

59,784 


London Township 


Louth Township 


1922 


1921 


1922 


1921 


1922 


1921 


1922 


$ c. 
1,283.96 


$ c. 

293,682.97 

315,050.85 

496,394.63 

11,033.39 

85,915.04 

203,142.41 

31,895.40 

11,767.36 

74,340.76 


$ c. 

306,050.90 

367,004.39 

603,074.05 

37,643.05 

102,994.87 

217,176.20 

33,780.32 

11,794.66 

72,489.85 


$ c. 


$ c. 


$ c. 


$ c. 












26,476.01 


2,934.70 


3,126.76 


1,482.84 


1,824.15 


12,249.58 

10,595.20 

1,238.10 


1,114.40 
1,066.80 


1,114.40 
1,066.80 


2,029.62 
624.92 


2,210.81 
625.52 


5,772.22 










1,372.71 


451.74 


451.74 




Cr. 126.84 




4,750.70 






1,733.80 


1,733.80 














63,738.48 
70.78 


1,523,192.81 
9,441.64 


1,752,008.29 
9,058.93 


7,301.44 
212.06 


7,493.50 


4,137.38 
94.02 


4,533.64 
6 30 








2,736.79 


272,019.01 
77,250.14 

121,509.04 
67,774.33 


224,598.74 
73,704.93 
226,674.90 
122,706.99 
186,093.75 




679.59 


593.54 


485.98 
















2,084.71 






221.05 


279.77 




















68,630.76 


2,071,186.97 


2,594,846.53 


7,513.50 


8,173.09 


5,045.99 
370.09 


5,305.69 
433.57 














68,630.76 


2,071,186.97 


2,594,846.53 


7,513.50 


8,173.09 


5,416.08 


5,-739.26 


31,654.64 

2,252.22 


930,799.79 
154,870.95 


1,045,575.19 

291,262.76 

99,357.95 

20,095. 8S 


7,080.00 
13.50 


6,850.93 
673.09 


1,851.55 
2,996.93 


1,797.10 
3,171.29 


5,742.30 


2,235.86 




















39,649.16 


1,087,906.60 


1,456,291.79 


7,093.50 


7,524.02 


4,848.48 


4,968.39 


8,312.16 


330,108.46 
67,774.33 


351,420.22 
122,706.99 






248.10 
221.05 


338.20 


2,084.71 






279.77 










10,396.87 


397,882.79 


474,127.21 






469.15 


617.97 










11,535.25 


66,100.21 
121,509.04 
397,788.33 


76,324.81 
226,674.90 
361,427.82 


420.00 


649.07 


98.45 


152.90 


7,049.48 




















18,584.73 


585,397.58 


664,427.53 


420.00 


649.07 


98.45 


152.90 


68,630.76 


2,071,186.97 


2,594,846.53 


7,513.50 


8,173.09 


5,416.08 


5,739.26 


59.6 


52.5 


59.0 


94.6 


92.0 


96.2 


98.9 



320 



FIFTEENTH ANNUAL REPORT OF THE 



No. 49 



STATEMENT 
Comparative Balance Sheets of Electrical Departments 



NIAGARA 
SYSTEM— Continued 



Municipality 
Population 


Lucan 
624 


Lynden Police Village 


Markham 
970 




1921 


1922 


1921 


1922 


1921 


Assets 

Lands and buildings 


$ c. 


$ c. 


$ c. 
241.18 


$ c. 
241.18 


$ c. 


Substation equipment 








Distribution system, overhead.. . . 
Distribution system, underground 
Line transformers 


7,277.13 


7,417.27 


2,720.56 


2,741.16 


8,205.04 


2,907.90 

2,558.89 
372.54 


2,956.12 
2,406.75 

372.54 


942.37 
744 . 62 
163.30 


1,094.69 
864 . 84 
163.30 


3,398.26 


Meters 


2,705.75 


Street light equipment, regular. . . 
Street light equip., ornamental. . . 


335.51 


Misc. construction expense. 

Steam or hydraulic plant 


394.47 


394.47 


193.57 


193.57 


1,016.01 


Old plant 


2,860.45 


2,860.45 






61.03 










Total plant 

Bank and cash balance 


16,371.38 

1,959.99 

3,000.00 

2,014.16 

111.51 


16,407.60 

1,267.24 

7,000.00 

323.52 

43.97 


5,005.60 


5,298.74 
467.10 


15,721.60 


Securities and investments 






Accounts receivable 


448.42 


396.82 


1,759.30 






Sinking fund on local debentures. 








Equity in Hydro systems 

Other assets 


442.18 


1,427.11 


448.97 


1,191.51 


















Total assets 


23,899.22 


26,469.44 


5,902.99 
225.46 


7,354.17 


17,480.90 


Deficit 














Total 


23,899.22 


26,469.44 


6,128.45 


7,354.17 


17,480.90 






Liabilities 

Debenture balance 

Accounts payable. . . . 


9,135.01 


" 8,761.29 


4,067.49 


3,981.91 


10,520.84 
674.39 


Bank overdraft 






66.48 




751.21 


Other liabilities 




















Total liabilities 


9,135.01 


8,761.29 


4,133.97 


3,981.91 


11,946.44 






Reserves 

For depreciation 


2,752.63 
442 . 18 


3,105.53 
1,427.11 


1,118.00 
448.97 


1,259.00 
1,191.51 


755.00 


For equity in H.E.P.C. system. . . 






Total reserves 


3,194.81 


4,532.64 


1,566.97 


2,450.51 


755.00 






Surplus 

Debentures paid 


2,078.61 


2,452.33 


427.51 


513.09 


1,037.99 


Local sinking fund. . 




Additional operating surplus 


9,490.79 


10,723.18 




408 . 66 


3,741.47 






Total surplus 


11,569.40 


13,175.51 


427.51 


921.75 


4,779.46 






Total liabilities, reserves & surplus 


23,899.22 


26,469.44 


6,128.45 


7,354.17 


17,480.90 


Per cent of net debt to total assets. 


38 . 2 


35.0 


70.2 


64.7 


68.4 






1923 



HYDRO-ELECTRIC POWER COMMISSION 



321 



" A "— Continued 

of Hydro Municipalities as at December 31, 1922 



Markham 


Merlin P. V. 


Merritton 
2,589 


Milton 
1,900 


Milverton 
1,054 


1922 


1922 


1921 


1922 


1921 


1922 


1921 


1922 


$ c. 


$ c. 


$ c. 

350.00 

3,000.00 

10,814.64 


$ c. 

350.00 

3,000.00 

12,146.45 


$ c. 


$ c. 


$ c. 
237.20 


$ c. 
237.20 






5,550.19 
12,155.85 


5,550.19 
12,668.74 




8,770.58 


3,424.43 


7,251.71 


7,666.31 


3,398.26 

2,949.65 

335.51 


2,117.13 

1,293.80 

373.49 


2,629.94 
5,876.02 
1,407.25 


2,845.82 
6,269.57 
1,407.25 


5,737.93 

5,242.12 

986.67 


7,248.23 

6,240.48 

986.67 


5,080.18 

2,553.05 

562.24 


5,080.18 

2,895.36 

562.24 


1,016.01 


351.93 


2,457.51 


2,250.26 


2,526.23 


2,526.23 


557.93 


557.93 


11.03 


275.00 






4,065.85 


4,065.85 
















16,481.04 


7,835.78 


26,535.36 
1,653.72 


28,269.35 
1,061.86 


36,264.84 

4,439.80 
2,000.00 
8,685.46 
1,239.30 


39,286.39 

2,382.30 
5,000.00 
1,471.98 
5,382.69 


16,242.31 


16,999.22 










2,316.18 


2,239.97 


503.58 
130.75 


2,200.00 
44.41 


5,272.51 


3,436.74 










145.76 






64.91 


1,971.45 


6,579.74 




1,369.57 




























18,942.98 


10,075.75 


28,823.41 


31,640.53 


54,600.85 


60,103.10 


21,514.82 


21,805.53 




















10,075.75 


28,823.41 


31,640.53 


54,600.85 


60,103.10 


21,514.82 


21,8.05.53 


9,888.45 


8,505.00 
1,570.75 


4,643 . 10 
317.70 


4,072.84 
1,224.22 


13,308.68 
776.73 


12,370.36 
3,814.79 


7,622.97 

1,482.20 

908.66 


7,247.23 
128.62 


29.06 


409 . 83 
































9,917.51 


10,075.75 


4,960.80 


5,297.06 


14,085.41 


16,185.15 


10,013.83 


7,785.68 


1,085.00 




948.00 


1,497.00 
64.91 


9,725.04 
1,971.45 


9,951.24 
6,579.74 


2,307.00 


2,639.24 
1,369.57 


145.76 


















1,561.91 




16,530.98 










1,670.38 




543.11 


1,113.37 


11,404.30 


12,342.62 


1,877.03 


2,252.77 






6,124.33 




22,371.50 


23,668.19 


17,414.65 


15,044.35 


7,316.96 


7,758.27 






7,794.71 




22,914.61 


24,781.50 


28,818.95 


27,386.97 


9,193.99 


10,011.04 






18,942.98 


10,075.75 


28,823.41 


31,640.53 


54,600.85 


60,103.10 


21,514.82 


21,805.53 


52.7 


100.0 


17.2 


16.7 


25.6 


30.2 


46.6 


38.0 



11 H.C. 



322 



FIFTEENTH ANNUAL REPORT OF THE 



No. 49 



STATEMENT 
Comparative Balance Sheets of Electrical Departments 



NIAGARA 
SYSTEM— Continued 



Municipality 
Population 


Mimico 
4,187 


Mitchell 
1,699 


Moorefield 




1921 


1922 


1921 


1922 


1921 


Assets 

Lands and buildings 


$ c . 

98.30 

50.18 

31,795.20 


$ c. 

9,796.63 

50.18 

36,718.39 


$ c. 

7,922.78 

10,441.48 

13,341.40 


$ c. 

9,191.17 

10,945.65 

15,830.70 


$ c. 


Substation equipment 




Distribution system, overhead.. . . 
Distribution system, underground 
Line transformers 


2,601.73 


9,844.66 

11,900.69 

2,641.23 


11,766.63 

13,977.89 

2,760.56 


5,651.14 

6,543.48 

1,598.23 

12.00 


6,385.43 
7,193.86 
1,964.33 


857.72 


Meters. 

Street light equipment, regular . . . 
Street light equip., ornamental . . 


577.00 
295 . 88 


Misc. construction expense 

Steam or hydraulic plant .... 


2,112.56 


2,431.51 


156.10 


348 35 






Old plant 






1,500.00 


1,500.00 












Total plant 


58,442.82 
599.13 


77,501.79 
1,606.30 


47,010.51 

3,016.99 

2,000.00 

2,060.92 

431.86 


53,167.24 

2,470.04 

2,000.00 

651.44 

1,156.35 


4,680.68 


Bank and cash balance 


326.47 


Securities and investments 




Accounts receivable 


402 . 75 
236.43 


1,451.40 
307.90 


204.56 


Inventories 


110.00 


Sinking fund on local debentures 




Equity in Hydro systems 

Other assets 


1,320.11 


3,153.40 


2,825.46 


4,068.94 


















Total assets 


61,001.24 


84,020.79 


57,345.74 


63,514.01 


5,321.71 


Deficit 
















Total 


61,001.24 


84,020.79 


57,345.74 


63,514.01 


5,321.71 






Liabilities 

Debenture balance 


20,684.34 
6,055.95 


39,740.51 
7,302.96 


7,183.45 


6,191.39 
736.76 


3,952.35 


Accounts payable 




Bank overdraft 






Other liabilities 
























Total liabilities 


26,740.29 


47,043.47 


7,183.45 


6,928.15 


3,952.35 


Reserves 

For depreciation 


12,159.30 
1,320.11 


13,949.30 
3,153.40 


12,953.00 
2,825.46 


13,862.50 
4,068.94 


536.00 


For equity in H.E.P.C. system. . . 






Total reserves 


13,479.41 


17,102.70 


15,778.46 


17,931.44 


536.00 






Surplus 

Debentures paid 


5,315.66 


6,259.49 


15,111.77 


16,103.83 


547.65 


Local sinking fund . 




Additional operating surplus 


15,465.88 


13,615.13 


19,272.06 


22,550.59 


285.71 


Total surplus 


20,781.54 


19,874.62 


34,383.83 


38,654.42 


833.36 






Total liabilities, reserves & surplus 


61,001.24 


84,020.79 


57,345.74 


63,514.01 


5,321.71 


Per cent of net debt to total assets. 


43.8 


58.2 


12.5 


11.6 


74.3 



1923 



HYDRO-ELECTRIC POWER COMMISSION 



323 



' 'A"- Continued 

of Hydro Municipalities as at December 31, 1922 



Police Village 


Mount Brydges Police Vil. 


Newbury 
301 


New Hamburg 
1,401 


1922 


1921 


1922 


1921 


1922 


1921 


1922 


$ c. 


$ c. 


$ c. 


$ c. 


$ c. 


$ c. 

2,317.59 

1,083.10 

11,253.95 


$ c. 
2,317.59 
1,083.10 












2,637.54 


2,757.54 


2,927.02 


5,408.07 


5,800.41 


12,690.05 


857.72 
595.86 
295.88 


641.25 

1,125.89 

120.09 


641.25 

1,270.88 

120.09 


1,049.04 
661.52 
765.45 


1,036.62 
696.90 
765.45 


4,084.29 
4,527.65 
1,149.43 


4,423 . 10 
4,896.44 
1,303.76 


348.35 


143.82 


143.82 


485.13 


485.13 


1,001.70 


1,001.70 








754.39 


348.22 


5,242.56 


5,242.56 








4,735.35 
959.15 


4,788.59 
1,468.92 


5,103.06 
2,457.03 


9,123.60 
359.08 


9,132.73 
207.03 


30,660.27 
488.91 


32,958.30 
889.04 


110.00 


1,064.00 
125.01 


706.35 
34.41 


559.29 


1,057.72 


24.17 
6,881.82 


4,143.56 
1,151.43 








83.35 


214.72 


527.88 




37.16 


3,004.42 


4,369 . 74 




34.48 
















5,887.85 


7,661.24 


8,828.73 


10,076.45 


10,434.64 


41,059.59 


43,512.07 






















10,076.45 




41,059.59 


43,512.07 


3,795.21 
232.49 


3,738.30 
67.84 


3,653.53 


9,440.04 
125.72 


8,700.00 
398.84 


14,151.04 
396.67 


13,687.67 
38.62 




































4,027.70 


3,806.14 


3,653.53 


9,565.76 


9,098.84 


14,547.71 


13,726.29 


644.00 


1,158.00 
214.72 


1,300.00 

527.88 




166.00 
37.16 


9,558.00 
3,004.42 


9,940.00 


83.35 




4,369.74 




























704.79 


481.70 


566.47 


314.35 


1,054.39 


3,578.04 


4,041.41 


428.01 


2,000.68 


2,780.85 


196.34 


78.25 


10,371.42 


11,434.63 


1,132.80 


2,482.38 


3,347.32 


510.69 


1,132.64 


13,949.46 


15,476.04 


5,887.85 


7,661.24 


8,828.73 


10,076.45 


10,434.64 


41,059.59 


43,512.07 


69.5 


49.6 


44.0 


95.6 


87.5 


35.5 


35.1 



324 



FIFTEENTH ANNUAL REPORT OF THE 



No. 49 



STATEMENT 
Comparative Balance Sheets of Electrical Departments 



NIAGARA 
SYSTEM— Continued 



Municipality 
Population 


New Toronto 
2,947 


Niagara Falls 
15,895 


Niagara- 
1,714 




1921 


1922 


1921 


1922 


1921 


Assets 

Lands and buildings. . . . 


$ c. 


$ c. 
395.00 


$ c 
25,511.64 
40,661.76 
95,042.52 


$ c 

88,391.10 

85,004.80 

112,914.63 


$ c. 
200 00 


Substation equipment 




1,148.47 


Distribution system, overhead.. . . 
Distribution system, underground 


36,313.38 


39,368.97 


9,168.82 


Line transformers 


9,459.84 
9,948.09 
2,567.53 


10,600.95 

11,268.78 

3,259.44 


77,364.01 
65,853.96 
15,637.21 
17,346.71 
7,946.26 


80,138.67 
72,770.87 
15,720.49 
29,807.06 
5,869.74 


3,164.31 


Meters. 

Street light equipment, regular. . . 
Street light equip., ornamental . . 


3,160.30 
640 . 66 


Misc. construction expense 

Steam or hydraulic plant . . 


2,320.33 


2,320.33 


952.26 


Old plant 
























Total plant 


60,609.17 

25,327.64 


67,213.47 
12,301.12 


345,364.07 
2,924.97 


490,617.36 
26,054.23 


18,434.82 


Bank and cash balance 


597.06 


Securities and investments . . 




Accounts receivable 


3,689.67 
956.20 


6,903.94 
935.91 


15,392.76 


29,685.04 


2,159.48 


Inventories 


17.77 


Sinking fund on local debentures 








Equity in Hydro systems 

Other assets 


5,160.30 


17,467.82 


263.23 


10,879.40 
4,295.02 
















Total assets 


95,742.98 


104,822.26 


363,945.03 


561,531.05 


21,209.13 


Deficit 
















Total 


95,742.98 


104,822.26 


363,945.03 


561,531.05 


21,209.13 






Liabilities 

I Debenture balance 


6,850.15 
8,304.76 


6,672.25 

7,051.94 

4,192.12 

384.30 


116,513.51 

7,064.72 

52,376.85 


326,751.25 
19,244.75 


8,821.96 


Accounts payable 


836.27 


Bank overdraft 




Other liabilities 


82.50 


4,295.02 










Total liabilities 


15,237.41 


18,300.61 


175,955.08 


350,291.02 


9,658.23 






For depreciation 


9,241.00 
5,160.30 


10,562.24 
17,467.82 


41,253.65 
263.23 


40,840.99 
10,879.40 


1,128.00 


For equity in H.E.P.C. system. . . 






Total reserves 


14,401.30 


28,030.06 


41,516.88 


51,720.39 


1,128.00 






Surplus 

Debentures paid 


1,149.85 


1,327.75 


88,729.49 


103,491.75 


2,014.69 


Local sinking fund. . 




Additional operating surplus 


64,954.42 


57,163.84 


57,743.58 


56,027.89 


8,408.21 


Total surplus 


66,104.27 


58,491.59 


146,473.07 


159,519.64 


10,422.90 


Total liabilities, reserves & surplus 


95,742.98 


104,822.26 


363,945.03 


561,531.05 


21,209.13 


Per cent of net debt to total assets. 


15.9 


21.0 


48.4 


63.6 


45.6 



1923 



HYDRO-ELECTRIC POWER COMMISSION 



325 



" A "—Continued 

of Hydro Municipalities as at December 31, 1922 



on-the-Lake 


Norwich 
1,307 


North Norwich Twp. 


South Norwich Twp. 


1922 


1921 


1922 


1921 


1922 


1921 


1922 


$ c. 
200.00 


$ c. 
922.30 


$ c. 
922.30 


$ c. 


$ c. 


$ c. 


$ c. 


1,148.47 
11,689.77 










7,643.02 


7,962.63 


1,111.96 


1,111.96 


1,989.03 


1,989.03 


3,164.31 

3,479.18 

698.30 


2,811.32 
4,723.16 
824.16 
1,956.25 
1,599.84 


3,235.29 
4,982.85 
882.90 
2,754.54 
1,412.34 


3,627.17 
1,018.34 


3,627.17 
1,018.34 


2,411.09 
479.00 


2,411.09 
479.00 












1,157.26 


234.23 


234.23 


339.84 


339.84 




3,509.82 


3,509.82 




















21,537.29 
1,745.67 


23,989.87 

1,233.85 

3,000.00 

8,669.75 

832.17 


25,662.67 

3,247.33 

6,000.00 

4,380.82 

480.53 


5,991.70 

88.36 


5,991.70 
34.30 


5,218.96 


5,218.96 








187.53 






























475.47 


2,286 19 
54.06 


3,731.82 
































23,945.96 


40,065 . 89 


43,503.17 


• 6,080.06 


6,026.00 


5,218.96 


5,218.96 
















23,945.96 


40,065.89 


43,503.17 


6,080.06 


6,026.00 


5,218.96 


5,218.96 


7,738.45 
434.65 


11,286.20 
960.25 


10,955.66 
1,189.02 


5,321.66 
54.06 


5,192.51 


4,542.85 


4,347.70 






































8,173.10 


12,246.45 


12,144.68 


5,375.72 


5,192.51 


4,542.85 


4,347.70 


1,326.28 


11,160.56 
2,286.19 


11,187.85 
3,731.82 










475.47 




















1,801.75 


13,446.75 


14,919.67 




















3,098.20 


2,469.80 


2,800.34 


704.34 


833.49 


676.11 


871.26 


10,872.91 


11,902.89 


13,638.48 




















13,971.11 


14,372.69 


16,438.82 


704 . 34 


833.49 


676.11 


871.26 


23,945.96 


40,065.89 


43,503.17 


6,080.06 


6,026.00 


5,218.96 


5,218.96 


34.8 


30.5 


30.6 


88.5 


86.1 


86.0 


83.3 



326 



FIFTEENTH ANNUAL REPORT OF THE 



No. 49 



STATEMENT 
Comparative Balance Sheets of Electrical Departments 



NIAGARA 
SYSTEM— Continued 



Municipality 
Population 


Oil Springs 
491 


Otterville Police Vil. 


Palmerston 
1,780 




1921 


1922 


1921 


1922 


1921 


Assets 

Lands and buildings 


$ c. 
42.00 


$ c. 
1,042.00 


$ c. 


$ c. 


$ c. 


Substation equipment. . 






691.88 


Distribution system, overhead.. . . 
Distribution system, underground 


10,464.71 


10,783.50 


3,523.26 


3,623.30 


13,346.71 


Line transformers 

Meters 


4,727.83 

2,418.54 

276.29 


5,044.17 

2,660.47 

305.72 


1,659.55 

1,121.93 

244.94 


1,774.43 

1,147.31 

341.80 


3,514.53 
4,191.64 


Street light equipment, regular. . . 
Street light equip., ornamental. . . 


746.32 


Misc. construction expense 

Steam or hydraulic plant 


1,783.58 


1,718.58 


142.00 


142.00 


1,638.06 


Old plant 










4,018.71 














Total plant 

Bank and cash balance 


19,712.95 

1,476.38 


21,554.44 
1,467.47 


6,691.68 

421.39 

2,000.00 

177.04 

30.75 


7,028.84 

1,258.18 

2,000.00 

42.03 

74.32 


28,147.85 
1,362.12 


Securities and investments 




Accounts receivable 


235.13 
2,643.61 


1,918.36 
1,432.09 


6,093.29 


Inventories 


4,322.09 


Sinking fund on local debentures. 




Equity in Hydro systems 




430.65 




165.44 




Other assets 




















Total assets 


24,068.07 


26,803.01 


9,320.86 


10,568.81 


39,925.35 


Deficit 
















Total 


24,068.07 


26,803.01 


9,320.86 


10,568.81 


39,925.35 






Liabilities 

Debenture balance 


15,188.85 
4,199.31 


14,607.58 
2,755.64 


3,646.71 


3,473.18 
50.47 


9,302.09 


Accounts payable 


3,597.45 


Bank overdraft. . 






Other liabilities. .... 
























Total liabilities 


19,388.16 


17,363.22 


3,646.71 


3,523.65 


12,899.54 






Reserves 

For depreciation 


1,409.00 


1,809.00 
430.65 


1,140.00 


1,272.60 
165.44 


4,826.00 


For equity in H.E.P.C. system . 












Total reserves 


1,409.00 


2,239.65 


1,140.00 


1,438.04 


4,826.00 






Surplus 

Debentures paid 


1,532.46 


2,113.73 


853.29 


1,026.82 


12,697.91 


Local sinking fund 




Additional operating surplus 


1,738.45 


5,086.41 


3,680.86 


4,580.30 


9,501.90 


Total surplus 


3,270.91 


7,200.14 


4,534.15 


5,607.12 


22,199.81 






Total liabilities, reserves & surplus 


24,068.07 


26,803.01 


9,320.86 


10,568.81 


39,925.35 


Per cent of net debt to total assets. 


80.8 


65.9 


39.2 


33.6 


32.4 



1923 



HYDRO-ELECTRIC POWER COMMISSION 



327 



" A "—Continued 

of Hydro Municipalities as at December 31, 1922 



Palmerston 


Paris 
4,400 


Parkhill 
1,201 


Petrolia 
2,911 


1922 


1921 


1922 


1921 


1922 


1921 


1922 


$ c. 


$ c. 

7,626.26 

10,959.86 

42,231.09 


$ c. 

7,626.26 

11,174.51 

44,332.34 


$ c. 


$ c. 


$ c. 

900.00 

2,403.55 

26,419.82 


$ c. 
900.00 


691.88 






2,403.55 


16,085.95 


12,438.35 


12,738.42 


26,929.54 


4,062.85 

4,373.95 

825 . 60 


13,583.15 

12,541.16 

2,400.94 

6,647.54 

350.20 


14,001.74 

13,512.94 

2,571.62 

9,371.33 

350.20 


2,092.56 

2,467.13 

823.68 


2,092.56 

2,676.80 

823.68 


17,125.22 

9,420.19 

985.28 

3,864.07 

4,885.19 


19,073.93 

10,484.88 

985.28 

3,864.07 


1,880.19 


1,251.77 


1,251.77 


4,718.19 


4,018 71 


16,684.76 


16,684.76 






3,389.94 


3,389.94 










31,939.13 
1,935 55 


113,033.96 

32.35 
3,000.00 


119,625.70 


'19,073.49 


19,583.23 
1,729.02 


69,393.26 


72,749.38 










4,000.00 


8,278.75 




2,663.89 


607.75 


3,614.24 
8,148.61 


1,137.82 


3,614 44 


26.57 

21,004.82 

1,037.82 


909.68 

24,084.72 

3,993.53 


10,656.32 










1,177 28 




131.74 




3,153.11 
























46,945.15 


138,135.52 


148,613.63 


21,737.38 


22,051.74 


81,156.11 


91,696.63 
















46,945.15 


138,135.52 


148,613.63 


21,737.38 


22,051.74 


81,156.11 


91,696.63 


13,049.37 
799.26 


45,171.54 
907.46 


42,952.71 

628.60 

1,790.05 


10,961.27 
3,860.51 


13,356.07 


44,373.07 


43,161.13 






2,361.25 


5,053.31 
























13,848.63 


46,079.00 


45,371.36 


16,671.78 


13,356.07 


•46,734.32 


48,214.44 


4,919.12 
1,177.28 


23,804.00 
1,037.82 


26,629.00 
3,993.53 


670.00 


1,058.00 
131.74 


10,274.28 


11,168.58 
3,153.11 












24,841.82 


30,622.53 


670.00 


1,189.74 


10,274.28 


14,321.69 


13,950.63 


31,828.46 
14,381.42 


34,047.29 

14,487 . 73 


712.45 


1,099.21 


5,626.93 


6,838.87 


13,049.49 


3,683.15 


6,406.72 


18,520.58 


22,321.63 


27,000.12 


67,214.70 


72,619.74 


4,395.60 


7,505 93 


24,147.51 


29,160.50 


46,945.15 


138,135.52 


148,613.63 


21,737.38 


22,051.74 


81,156.11 


91,696.63 


™.2 


33.4 


31.4 


77.0 


61.0 


57.5 


54.5 



328 



FIFTEENTH ANNUAL REPORT OF THE 



No. 49 



STATEMENT 
Comparative Balance Sheets of Electrical Departments 



NIAGARA 
SYSTEM— Continued 



Municipality 
Population 


Plattsville Police Vil. 


Point Edward 
1,150 


Port 

Colborne 

3,123 




1921 


1922 


1921 


1922 


1921 


Assets 

Lands and buildings 


$ c. 


$ c. 


$ c. 


$ c. 


$ c. 


Substation equipment 












Distribution system, overhead. . . 
Distribution system, underground 


2,949.66 


2,954.69 


7,856.34 


8,253.82 


31,856.07 


Line transformers 


906.14 

1,252.80 

133.65 


906.14 

1,271.10 

133.65 


3,584.50 

2,312.59 

467.55 


4,129.00 

2,502.84 

480.25 


6,644.54 

8,087.18 

723.92 


Meters 


Street light equipment, regular. . . 
Street light equip., ornamental. . . 


Misc. construction expense 

Steam or hydraulic plant 


535.92 


535.92 


366.39 


366.39 


4,457.13 


Old plant 










9,929.60 














Total plant 


5,778.17 


5,801.50 
69.02 


14,587.37 


15,732.30 


61,698.44 


Bank and cash balance. . 


170.00 


Securities and investments 










Accounts receivable 


271.36 


271.36 






745 . 69 


Inventories 






3,215.81 


Sinking fund on local debentures. 












Equity in Hydro systems 

Other assets 


977.92 


1,544.68 


























Total assets 


7,027.45 
1,525.75 


7,686.56 
2,127.27 


14,587.37 


15,732.30 


65,829.94 


Deficit 












Total 


8,553.20 


9,813.83 


14,587.37 


15,732.30 


65,829.94 






Liabilities 

Debenture balance 

Accounts payable 


4,595.22 

873.11 

46.19 


4,484.30 
1,452.07 


5,672.73 
4,201.81 


5,402.82 
5,058.78 


49,642.56 


Bank overdraft 


7,387.70 


Other liabilities 








155.00 














Total liabilities 


5,514.42 


5,936.37 


9,874.54 


10,461.60 


57,185.26 






For depreciation 


1,419.08 
977.92 


1,580.08 
1,544.68 


2,438.00 


2,851.00 


1,892.00 


For equity in H.E.P.C. system. . . 










Total reserves 


2,397.00 


3,124.76 


2,438.00 


2,851.00 


1,892.00 






Surplus 

Debentures paid 


641.78 


752 . 70 


1,327.27 


1,597.18 


2,357.44 


Local sinking fund. . . 




Additional operating surplus 






947.56 


822.52 


4,395.24 










Total surplus 


641.78 


752.70 


2,274.83 


2,419.70 


6,752.68 






Total liabilities, reserves & surplus 


8,553.20 


9,813.83 


14,587.37 


15,732.30 


65,829.94 


Per cent of net debt to total assets. 


78.4 


96.6 


67.7 


66.4 


87 



1923 



HYDRO-ELECTRIC POWER COMMISSION 



329 



" A "—Continued 

of Hydro Municipalities as at December 31, 1922 



Port 
Colborne 


Port Credit 
1,119 


Port Dalhousie 
1,424 


Port Dover 
1,380 


1922 


1921 


1922 


1921 


1922 


1921 


1922 


$ c. 


$ c. 
675.00 


$ c. 
675.00 


$ c. 


$ c. 


$ c. 


$ c. 












35,963.76 


10,203.96 


11,541.85 


4,501.10 


8,268.40 


17,685.88 


18,735.76 


8,816.63 
9,310.87 
1,234.33 


1,787.03 
3,147.35 

544.72 


1,898.47 

3,721.27 

544.72 


3,957.52 

4,311.43 

509.05 


4,293.82 

4,616.94 

515.10 


3,931.05 

955.86 

1,431.76 


4,414.72 
1,775.31 
1,449.22 


5,278.29 


626.31 


626.31 


1,491.16 


1,574.96 


930.93 


2,180.10 


9,929.60 






6,018.38 


6,018.38 














70,533,48 
201 99 


16,984.37 

1,567.49 
3,800.00 


19,007.62 

1,479.01 
3,800.00 


20,788.64 
1,422.55 


25,287.60 
1,743.19 


24,935.48 
92.01 


28,555.11 






2,047.84 
5,233.13 


212.78 


1,378.05 


39.93 
















167.98 

972.72 






446 65 


455.91 


1,006.71 


834.33 




59.62 






















78,463.09 


22,807.77 


25,293.34 


23,258.30 
542.20 


29,549.54 


25,067.42 


28,614.73 














78,463.09 


22,807.77 


25,293.34 


23,800.50 


29,549.54 


25,067.42 


28,614.73 


48,039.52 

16,408.92 

1,264.58 


6,676.13 
405.69 


5,896.04 
1,192.99 


14,928.67 
1,497.37 


19,422.08 
1,284.67 


21,000.00 
3,485.72 


19,824.01 

6,121.61 

301.89 


























65,889.66 


7,081.82 


7,089.03 


16,426.04 


20,706.75 


25,067.42 


26,247.51 


2,985.00 
446 65 


5,069.94 
455.91 


5,129.54 
1,006.71 


3,968.80 
834.33 


2,944.34 
972.72 




527.00 




59.62 










5,525.85 




4,803 . 13 














3,960.48 


1,823.87 


2,603.96 


2,571.33 


3,077.92 

167.98 

1,679.83 




1,175.99 








5,181.30 


8,376.23 


9,464.10 






604.61 










9,141.78 


10,200.10 


12,068.06 


2,571.33 


4,925.73 




1,780.60 








78,463.09 


22,807.77 


25,293.34 


23,800.50 


29,549.54 


25,067.42 


28,614.73 


84.4 


31.1 


29.2 


70.5 


72.4 


100.0 


88.5 



330 



FIFTEENTH ANNUAL REPORT OF THE 



No. 49 



STATEMENT 
Comparative Balance Sheets of Electrical Departments 



NIAGARA 
SYSTEM— Continued 



Municipality 
Population 


Port Stanley 
717 


Preston 
5,547 


Princeton 




1921 


1922 


1921 


1922 


1921 


Assets 

Lands and buildings 


$ c. 
1,505.38 


$ c 
1,505.38 


$ c. 


$ c. 


$ c. 


Substation equipment 


14,018.83 
51,748.76 


32,400.58 
54,677.50 




Distribution system, overhead.. . . 
Distribution system, underground 

Line transformers 

Meters 


14,532.87 


15,131.34 


2,002.42 


4,932.28 

2,889.21 

766.67 


5,609.30 

3,013.80 

903.93 


23,515.69 

18,770.93 

3,476.90 

3,874.86 

6,399.23 


31,917.23 

24,118.34 

3,558.17 

3,560.33 

6,217.23 


296.86 
552.14 


Street light equipment, regular . . . 
Street light equip., ornamental. . . 


116.30 


Misc. construction expense 

Steam or hydraulic plant 


5,606.55 


5,606.55 


64.35 


Old plant 


577.51 


577.51 


23,549.22 


23,549.22 








Total plant 


30,817.47 
745.95 


32,347.81 
2,769.81 


145,354.42 
1,689.01 


179,998.60 
50 00 


3,032.07 


Bank and cash balance 


476.43 


Securities and investments 




Accounts receivable 


2,115.47 
276.03 


890.86 
181.55 


1,380.58 


3,350.53 


521.77 


Inventories 


38.64 


Sinking fund on local debentures. 








Equity in Hydro systems 

Other assets 


2,718.56 


4,096.40 


8,735.89 


15,501.92 


372.15 














Total assets 


36,666.48 


40,286.43 


157,159.90 


198,901.05 


4,441.06 


Deficit 


1,316.64 














Total 


36,666.48 


40,286.43 


157,159.90 


198,901.05 


5,757.70 






Liabilities 


15,049.59 
474.17 


14,569.34 
8.90 


56,651.70 
4,021.00 


55,922.29 

4,585.96 

31,801.37 




Debenture balance 


3,114.93 


Accounts payable 


1,033.55 


Bank overdraft. . 




Other liabilities . 




5.00 
















Total liabilities 


15,523.76 


14,583.24 


60,672.70 


92,309.62 


4,148.48 






Reserves 

For depreciation 


7,265.25 
2,718.56 


8,063.25 
4,096.40 


35,125.96 
8,735.89 


37,133.14 
15,501.92 


802.00 


For equity in H.E.P.C. system. . . 


372.15 


Total reserves 


9,983.81 


12,159.65 


43,861.85 


52,635.06 


1,174.15 






Surplus 

Debentures paid 


3,900.41 


4,380.66 


32,213.81 


36,818.08 


435.07 


Local sinking fund. . 




Additional operating surplus 


7,258.50 


9,162.88 


20,411.54 


17,138.29 






Total surplus 


11,158.91 


13,543.54 


52,625.35 


53,956.37 


435.07 






Total liabilities, reserves & surplus 


36,666.48 


40,286.43 


157,159.90 


198,901.05 


5,757.70 


Per cent of net debt to total assets. 


42.3 


40.3 


38.7 


50.3 


93.5 



1923 



HYDRO-ELECTRIC POWER COMMISSION 



331 



" A "—Continued 

of Hydro Municipalities as at December 31, 1922 



Police Vil. 


Queenston Police Vil. 


Ridgetown 
2,267 


Riverside 
3,000 


Rockwood 


Police Vil. 


1922 


1921 


1922 


1921 


1922 


1922 


1921 


1922 


$ c. 


$ c. 


$ c. 


$ c. 


$ c. 


$ c. 


$ c. 
79 00 


$ c. 
79 00 








889.25 
11,338.25 


889.26 
11,736.22 






2,620.27 


6,006.62 


6,035.76 


25,222.02 


5,536.74 


5,684,57 


296.86 
610.14 
116.30 


811.89 
772.48 
395.59 


1,027.48 
909.31 
395.59 


-M83.72 
5,043.74 

896.88 
1,319.10 

363.25 


4,591.75 
5,495.72 

896.88 
. 1,319.10 

513.25 


7,360.86 
5,386.92 


1,211.93 

1,521.21 

316.46 


1,211.93 

1,619.75 

410.51 








64.35 


1,948.71 


1,948.71 


237.00 


308.05 


308.05 








5,128.46 


5,128.46 




















3,707.92 
740 . 19 


9,935.29 
615.51 


10,316.85 

542.74 


29,362.66 

3,453.31 
8,500.00 
1,472.71 
4,155.57 


30,570.64 

8,392.15 

8,500.00 

793.38 

3,290.37 


38,206.80 


8,973.39 
68.62 


9,313.81 
148.83 








38.64 


50.75 
12.83 


9.49 


1,450.28 


311.59 
177.80 


311.59 
264.71 










580.01 




58.92 


730.62 


2,014.61 




627.27 


1,026.07 


























5,066.76 
992.31 


10,614.38 


10,928.00 


47,674.87 


53,561.15 


39,657.08 


10,158.67 


11,065.01 


















6,059.07 


10,614.38 


10,928.00 




53,561.15 


39,657.08 


10,158.67 


11,065.01 


3,039.75 


8,000.00 
2,039.75 


7,782.52 
2,127.32 


14,697.74 


13,754.34 


29,500.00 
7,702.45 






1,070.78 


1,585.67 


678 S3 
















1,319.00 


1,319.10 




















4,110.53 


10,039.75 


9,909.84 


16,016.74 


15,073.44 


37,202.45 


1,585.67 


678.83 


858.28 
580.01 




167.00 
58.92 


4,864.00 
730.62 


5,518.00 
2,014.61 


1,171.69 


2,513.00 
627.27 


2,772.90 
1,026.07 








1,438.29 




225.92 


5,594.62 


7,532.61 


1,171.69 


3,140.27 


3,798.97 






510.25 




217.48 


4,758.35 


5,701.65 




2,000.00 


2,000.00 












574.63 


•574.76 


21,305.16 


25,253.45 


1,282.94 


3,432.73 


4,587.21 




510.25 


574.63 


792.24 


26,063.51 


30,955.10 


1,282.94 


5,432.73 


6,587.21 


6,059.07 


10,614.38 


10,928.00 


47,674.87 


53,561.15 


39,657.08 


10,158.67 


11,065.01 


91.6 


94.5 


91.1 


33.6 


29.2 


94.0 


15.5 


6.8 



332 



FIFTEENTH ANNUAL REPORT OF THE 



No. 49 



STATEMENT 
Comparative Balance Sheets of Electrical Departments 



NIAGARA 
SYSTEM— Continued 












Municipality 
Population 


Rodney 
756 


St. Catharines 
20,961 


St. Clair 
Beach 

82 




1921 


1922 


1921 


1922 


1922 


Assets 

Lands and buildings 


$ c. 


$ c. 


$ c. 

38,247.02 

69,419.56 

143,546.52 


$ c. 

36,786.77 

68,425.61 

147,827.08 


$ c. 


Substation equipment 








Distribution system, overhead.. . . 
Distribution system, underground 
Line transformers 


6,034.78 


6,311.57 


4,708.54 


1,421.85 

2,039.48 

528.94 


1,494.68 

2,379.36 

569.24 


49,386.41 
46,545.48 
10,724.25 
11,227.12 
36,516.91 


55,632.49 
50,279.53 
13,493.18 
24,521.46 
38,192.45 


833 . 69 


Meters 


450.43 


Street light equipment, regular. . . 




Street light equip., ornamental. . . 




Misc. construction expense 


679.09 


695.00 




Steam or hydraulic plant 




Old plant 


700.00 


700.00 
















Total plant 


11,404.14 
318.79 


12,149.85 

614.79 
2,000.00 
1,370.79 


405,613.27 
1,910.13 


435,158.57 
1,316.41 


5,992.66 


Bank and cash balance 


Securities and investments 




Accounts receivable 


2,842.10 


13,684.84 
1,546.09 

21,785.16 
1,329.92 


19,413.78 

835.05 

25,172.14 

2,748.88 


3,854.42 


Inventories 




Sinking fund on local debentures. 








Equity in Hydro systems 




176.52 




Other assets 


















Total assets 


14,565.03 


16,311.95 


445,869.41 


484,644.83 


9,847.08 
2.04 


Deficit 














Total 


14,565.03 


16,311.95 


445,869.41 


484,644.83 


9,849.12 






Liabilities 

Debenture balance 


7,845.12 


7,691.76 


214,872.39 
20,793.27 


210,741.94 
36,840.77 


6,341.45 


Accounts payable 


3,507.67 


Bank overdraft 








Other liabilities 






10,407.20 














Total liabilities 


7,845.12 


7,691.76 


246,072.86 


272,104.17 


9,849.12 






Reserves 

For depreciation 


1,481.00 


1,747.00 
176.52 


59,488.44 
1,329.92 


65,680.30 

2,748.88 




For equity in H.E.P.C. system. . 










Total reserves 


1,481.00 


1,923.52 


60,818.36 


68,429.18 








Surplus 

Debentures paid. . 


654.88 


808.24 


17,150.52 

21,785.16 

100,042.51 


21,280.97 
25,172.14 
97,658.37 




Local sinking fund 




Additional operating surplus 


4,584.03 


5,888.43 






Total surplus 


5,238.91 


6,696.67 


138,978.19 


144,111.48 








Total liabilities, reserves & surplus 


14,565.03 


16,311.95 


445,869.41 


484,644.83 


9,849.12 


Per cent of net debt to total assets. 


53.8 


47.2 


55.3 


56.4 


100.0 



1923 



HYDRO-ELECTRIC POWER COMMISSION 



333 



" A "—Continued 

of Hydro Municipalities as at December 31, 1922 



St. George 


Police Vil. 


St. Jacobs Police Vil. 


St. Marys 
4,039 


St. Thomas 
17,892 


1921 


1922 


1921 


1922 


1921 


1922 


1921 


1922 


$ c. 


$ c. 


$ c. 


$ c. 


$ c. 
3,000.00 

23,305.78 
32,466.25 


$ c. 

3,000.00 

23,878.71 

35,750.80 


$ c. 

39,537.40 

69,697.91 

86,473.97 

9,974.22 

27,840.96 

45,906.72 

13,122.03 

7,538.63 

5,905.10 


$ c. 
41,969.65 










78,618.25 


3,195.53 


3,408.70 


3,524.40 


3,814.82 


88,116.01 
11,805.54 


1,175.69 

1,345.34 

218.11 


1,175.69 

1,423.95 

228.77 


904.72 

1,132.00 

263.53 


1,072.92 

1,240:71 

276.56 


11,855.98 

14,932.57 

2,217.66 


13,333.10 

15,942.18 

2,457.99 


33,031.68 

48,176.89 

13,138.22 

7,538.63 


374.18 


374.18 


452.22 


452.22 


3,432.60 


3,304.86 


7,535.17 










20,696.85 


20,696.85 


















6,308.85 
70.73 


6,611.29 

1,169.83 

5,000.00 

633.54 

321.80 


6,276.87 

1,055.89 

3,000.00 

298.73 


6,857.23 

737.80 

3,000.00 

538.76 


111,907.69 


118,364.49 


305,996.94 

2,697.77 
33,306.81 
23,240.53 
26,331.80 


329,930.04 
987.12 


5,000.00 
256.47 
405 . 20 






19,706.81 


2,376.93 
2,568.37 
4,868.51 
7,458.60 


6,026.64 

3,540.43 

5,414.11 

11,826.74 


30,499.86 
20,875.50 










215.34 


665.18 




'200.45 


20,231.24 


31,919.04 
























12,256.59 


14,401.64 


10,631.49 


11,334.24 


129,180.10 


145,172.41 


411,805.09 


433,918.37 


















12,256.59 


14,401.64 




11,334.24 


129,180.10 


145,172.41 


411,805.09 


433,918.37 


5,315.19 
71.71 


5,194.69 
50.43 


5,252.70 
105.45 


5,039.51 
134.00 


44,037.20 

326.42 

1,957.90 


41,757.81 

541.07 

9,362.58 


91,426.76 
22,026.64 


86,319.25 
28,259.07 






























5,386.90 


5,245.12 


5,358.15 


5,173.51 


46,321.52 


51,661.46 


111,453.40 


114,578.32 


1,372.00 
215.34 


1,549.00 
665.18 


944.00 


1,104.00 
200.45 


28,293.72 
7,458.60 


30,209.18 
11,826.74 


66,955.36 
20,231.24 


65,222.91 
31,919.04 






1,587.34 


2,214.18 




1,304.45 




42,035.92 


87,186.60 


97,141.95 


684.81 


805.31 


747.30 


960.49 


35,209.82 
4,86,8.51 
7,027.93 


37,489.21 
5,414.11 
8,571.71 


51,657.67 


56,765.18 


4,597.54 


6,137.03 


.3,582.04 


3,895.79 


161,507.42 


165,432.92 


5,282.35 


6,942.34 


4,329.34 


4,856.28 


47,106.26 


51,475.03 


213,165.09 


222,198.10 


12,256.59 


14,401.64 


10,631.49 


11,334.24 


129,180.10 


145,172.41 


411,805.09 


433,918.37 


43.9 


38.2 


50.4 


46.8 


35.8 


38.8 


27.1 


28.5 



334 



FIFTEENTH ANNUAL REPORT OF THE 



No. 49 



STATEMENT 
Comparative Balance Sheets of Electrical Departments 



NIAGARA 
SYSTEM— Continued 



Municipality 
Population 


Sarnia 
14,905 


Scarboro 


Township 


Seaforth 
1,950 




1921 


1922 


1921 


1922 


1921 


Assets 

Lands and buildings 


$ c. 

67,232.67 

85,016.46 

118,125.29 


$ c. 

75,247.75 

85,100.34 

124,458.08 


$ c. 


$ c. 


$ c. 

1,251.57 

5,995.27 

22,561.59 


Substation equipment 






Distribution system, overhead.. . . 
Distribution system, underground 


24,468.50 


53,122.33 


Line transformers 


58,366.12 

45,307.09 

4,796.01 

7,482.11 

19,215.34 


66,199.71 

50,294.89 

4,801.81 

7,482.11 

19,123.87 


7,975.82 

12,751.93 

4,448.02 


11,559.19 

16,810.21 

5,444.33 


6,474.14 
6,519.82 
1,055.71 


Meters 


Street light equipment, regular. . . 
Street light equip., ornamental. . . 


Misc. construction expense 

Steam or hydraulic plant 


862.05 


862.05 


355.98 


Old plant 


56,249.50 


56,249.50 
















Total plant 


461,790.59 
3,650.62 


488,958.06 
594.21 


50,506.32 
4,650.82 


87,798.11 
2,533.69 


44,214.08 
665 39 


Bank and cash balance 


Securities and investments 


11,000.00 


Accounts receivable 


37,890.12 
6,607.88 


16,404.16 
22,058.57 


2,770.40 


4,098.57 


3,591.12 
3,091.75 
5,351.67 


Inventories 


Sinking fund on local debentures . 






Equity in Hydro systems 




14,142.76 


2,046.48 


3,173.00 


7,971.16 


Other assets 


















Total assets 


509,939.21 


542,157.76 


59,974.02 

72.78 


97,603.37 


75,885.17 


Deficit 












Total 


509,939.21 


542,157.76 


60,046.80 


97,603.37 


75,885.17 




Liabilities 

Debenture balance 


268,819.05 
19,931.95 


258,907.19 
15,156.51 


39,781.85 
7,796.49 


38,510.53 

23,649.16 

7,937.41 

4,825.95 


25,000.00 


Accounts payable 




Bank overdraft 




Other liabilities 


14,008.23 


9,871.67 


1,625.83 








Total liabilities 


302,759.23 


283,935.37 


49,204.17 


74,923.05 


25,000.00 






Reserves 
For depreciation 


47,791.00 


57,040.00 
14,142.76 


6,078.00 
2,046.48 


8,153.50 
3,173.00 


14,746.25 


For equity in H.E.P.C. system. . . 


7,971.16 








Total reserves 


47,791.00 


71,182.76 


8,124.48 


11,326.50 


22,717.41 






Surplus 

Debentures paid 


29,180.95 


39,092.81 


2,718.15 


3,989.47 




Local sinking fund 




Additional operating surplus 


130,208.03 


147,946.82 




7,364.35 


22,816.09 








Total surplus 


159,388.98 


187,039.63 


2,718.15 


11,353.82 


28,167.76 






Total liabilities, reserves & surplus 


509,939.21 


542,157.76 


60,046.80 


97,603.37 


75,885.17 


Per cent of net debt to total assets. 


59.4 


53.7 


82.0 


79.4 


32.9 



1923 



HYDRO-ELECTRIC POWER COMMISSION 



335 



" A "— Continued 

of Hydro Municipalities as at December 31, 1922 



Seaforth 


Simcoe 
3,951 


Springfield 
432 


Stamford Township 


1922 


1921 


1922 


1921 


1922 


1921 


1922 


$ c. 
1,251.57 


$ c. 

1,496.75 

5,611.99 

20,141.33 


$ c. 

1,996.22 

5,611.99 

21,978.89 


$ c. 


$ c. 


$ c. 

3,040.54 

5,632.21 

32,819.69 


$ c. 
5,790.86 


5,995.27 






14,708.86 


24,935.14 


4,158.22 


4,257.52 


40,389.47 


7,138.18 
6,848.07 
1,055.71 


8,569.68 
6,201.31 
1,673.24 
2,527.16 
3,836.57 


9,616.45 
7,350.31 
1,764.14 
2,527.16 
3,880.65 


671.74 
863 . 76 
269.42 


671.74 
940.04 
269.42 


10,855.36 
8,377.59 
1,624.87 


13,888.15 

10,500.00 

3,437.79 


355.98 


675.08 


675.08 


6,166.13 


7,374.48 




927.92 


927.92 






15,127.16 


13,743.66 










47,579.92 
1,696.69 


50,985.95 


55,653.73 


6,638.22 
224.78 


6,813.80 
272.73 


83,643.55 


109,833.27 
1,101.14 


9,000.00 


11,000.00 
1,489.97 


6,000.00 
2,039.87 


1,191.30 




135.83 


4,867.31 


824.16 


5,354.95 




4,136.75 


6,011.48 














10,395.00 


284.71 


1,347.03 




80.85 




1,306.51 
























81,229.34 


63,760.63 


65,040.63 


6,863.00 


7,303.21 


88,510.86 


117,201.83 
















81,229.34 


63,760.63 


65,040.63 


6,863.00 


7,303.21 


88,510.86 


117,201.83 


25,000.00 
2,059.86 


35,434.90 
1,361.14 
1,899.54 
3,500.00 


34,631.60 

685.87 

392.42 

3,500.00 


2,803.35 
381.92 


2,296.00 
95.12 


45,033.04 

22,198.73 

2,111.05 

9.00 


72,734.60 
18,343.42 








185.00 










27,059.86 


42,195.58 


39,209.89 


3,185.27 


2,391.12 


69,351.82 


91,263.02 


14,936.25 


7,727.57 
284.71 


9,053.57 
1,347.03 






7,003.48 


8,451.49 


10,395.00 




80.85 


1,306.51 










25,331.25 


8,012.28 


10,400 . 60 




80.85 


7,003.48 


9,758.00 












803.30 




2,704.00 




5,265.40 


6,011.48 




22,826.75 


13,552.77 


14,626.84 


1,481.08 


2,127.24 


9,188.60 


10,915.41 


28,838.23 


13,552.77 


15,430.14 


3,677.73 


4,831.24 


12,155.56 


16,180.81 


81,229.34 


63,760.63 


65,040.63 


6,863.00 


7,303.21 


88,510.86 


117,201.83 


38.1 


66.2 


61.6 


46.4 


33.1 


78.4 


78.8 



336 



FIFTEENTH ANNUAL REPORT OF THE 



No. 49 



STATEMENT 
Comparative Balance Sheets of Electrical Departments 



NIAGARA 
SYSTEM— Continued 












Municipality 
Population 


Stratford 
17,611 


Strathroy 
2,627 


Tavistock 
1,003 




1921 


1922 


1921 


1922 


1921 


Assets 

Lands and buildings 


$ c. 

82,729.04 

60,565.85 

118,078.44 


$ c. 

93,356.55 

71,401.13 

123,423.52 


$ c. 

1,070.00 

8,061.36 

23,711.60 


$ c. 

1,070.00 

8,077.21 

25,812.68 


$ c. 
234.02 


Substation equipment 




Distribution system, overhead.. . . 
Distribution system, underground 
Line transformers 


6,406.49 


36,633.32 
54,682.90 
6,114.96 
11,075.05 
13,466.05 


48,026.67 
63,447.63 
6,114.96 
11,075.05 
13,360.08 


11,989.18 
9,379.04 
1,566.10 


12,568.51 

10,141.61 

1,566.10 


1,680.01 


Meters 


2,737.64 


Street light equipment, regular. . . 
Street light equip., ornamental. . . 

Misc. construction expense 

Steam or hydraulic plant 


711.93 


694.30 


694.30 


570.89 


Old plant 


16,260.00 


16,260.00 


12,343.15 


12,343.15 








Total plant 


399,605.61 

630.51 
23,000.00 
14,557.56 
6,093.55 
44,661.46 
18,587.51 


446,465.59 

5,177.56 
23,000.00 
54,686.53 
20,893.52 
52,659.30 
29,933.06 


68,814.73 

137.79 

3,000.00 

368.74 

11,342.02 


72,273.56 

1,099.62 

3,000.00 

368.40 

13,511.16 


12,340.98 


Bank and cash balance 


3,387.76 


Securities and investments 

Accounts receivable 


7,050.00 
1,118.77 


Inventories 


286.13 


Sinking fund on local debentures. 

Equity in Hydro systems 

Other assets 




1,304.68 


5,040.49 


















Total assets 

Deficit 


507,136.20 


632,815.56 


84,967.96 


95,293.23 


24,183.64 














Total 


507,136.20 


632,815.56 


84,967.96 


95,293.23 


24,183.64 






Liabilities 


222,000.00 
21,587.36 
24,000.00 


362,000.00 
1,272.74 


36,641.66 


34,963.01 




Debenture balance 


5,500.97 


Accounts payable 




Bank overdraft 








Other liabilities 


6,000.00 


















Total liabilities 


267,587.36 


369,272.74 


36,641.66 


34,963.01 


5,500.07 


Reserves 

For depreciation 


81,804.92 

18,587.51 


87,334.58 
29,933.06 


11,955.00 
1,304.68 


13,474.97 
5,040.49 


2,135.00 


For equity in H.E.P.C. system. . . 






Total reserves 


100,392.43 


117,267.64 


13,259.68 


18,515.46 


2,135.00 






Surplus 

Debentures paid 

Local sinking fund 

Additional operating surplus 


43,800.00 
44,661.46 
50,694.95 


43,800.00 
52,659.30 
49,815.88 


9,590.34 


11,268.99 


499.03 


25,476.28 


30,545.77 


16,048.64 


Total surplus 


139,156.41 


146,275.18 


35,066.62 


41,814.76 


16,547.67 






Total liabilities, reserves & surplus 


507,136.20 


632,815.56 


84,967.96 


95,293.23 


24,183.64 


Per cent of net debt to total assets. 


52.7 


61.2 


43.2 


38.8 


22.7 



1923 



HYDRO-ELECTRIC POWER COMMISSION 



337 



" A"— Continued 

of Hydro Municipalities as at December 31, 1922 



Tavistock 


Tecumseh 
1,019 


Thamesford Police Village 


Thamesville 
817 


Thedford 
583 


1922 


1922 


1921 


1922 


1921 


1922 


1922 


$ c. 
234.02 


$ c. 


$ c. 


$ c. 


$ c. 


$ c. 


$ c. 
















7,143.36 


17,971.48 


4,546.87 


4,972.70 


5,003.58 


5,394.18 


7,278.07 


1,680.01 

3,526.36 

711.93 


3,442.38 
3,932.09 


2,061.98 

1,221.19 

176.85 


2,075.36 

1,389.29 

176.85 


2,448.34 

2,143.88 

325.94 


2,448.34 

2,429.99 

325.94 


1,328.45 

1,603.33 

843.20 








570.89 


774.50 


214,02 


214.02 


561.75 


561.75 


1,530.81 










4,232.38 


4,232.38 


433 78 












13,866.57 
632.59 


26,120.45 


8,220.91 
1,476.61 


8,828.22 
1,920.88 


14,715.87 
1,317.25 


15,392.58 
4,449.09 


13,017.64 
3,319.74 


8,631.47 






2,417.48 
249.42 


309.12 


218.21 
26.30 


1,187.45 
10.05 


984.48 
425.28 


1,320.99 
425.28 


174.58 






1,210.83 




614.55 


1,299.22 


369.27 

7.77 


879.09 


15.60 




















27,008.36 


26,429.57 
1,094.89 


10,556.58 


13,245.82 


17,819.92 


22,467.03 


16,527.56 














27,008.36 


27,524.46 


10,556.58 




17,819.92 




16,527.56 


5,385.71 


18,048.73 
8,397.84 


4,414.80 


4,174.62 
320.51 


9,452.92 


9,115.03 


16,051.45 
7 29 








































5,385.71 


26,446.57 


4,414.80 


4,495.13 


9,452.92 


9,115.03 


16,058.74 


2,469.00 
1,210.83 


626.62 


2,173.69 
614.55 


2,425.69 
1,299.22 


2,414.86 
369.27 


2,660.19 
879.09 


15 60 




















614.29 


451.27 


943.23 


1,183.41 


1,734.88 


2,072.77 


448.55 


17,328.53 




2,410.31 


3,842.37 


3,847.99 


7,739.95 


4.67 








17,942.82 


451.27 


3,353.54 


5,025.78 


5,582.87 


9,812.72 


453.22 


27,008.36 


27,524.46 


10,556.58 


13,245.82 


17,819.92 


22,467.03 


16,527.56 


20.8 


100.0 


41.7 


37.6 


53.0 


42.3 


97.1 



338 



FIFTEENTH ANNUAL REPORT OF THE 



No. 49 



STATEMENT 
Comparative Balance Sheets of Electrical Departments 



NIAGARA 
SYSTEM— Continued 



Municipality 
Population 


Thorndale Police Vil. 


Thorold 
5,243 


Tilbury 
1,851 




1921 


1922 


1921 


1922 


1921 


Assets 

Lands and buildings 


$ c. 


$ c. 


$ c. 


$ c. 


$ c. 
957.46 


Substation equipment 












Distribution system, overhead.. . . 
Distribution system, underground 
Line transformers 


2,171.10 


2,171.10 


18,506.43 


20,264.56 


6,607.56 


939.20 

1,029.02 

80.36 


1,218.03 

1,029.02 

80.36 


5,594.34 

11,970.39 

1,530.68 


7,316.98 

12,797.07 

1,572.48 


3,966.51 


Meters 


3,265.80 


Street light equipment, regular. . . 
Street light equip., ornamental. . . 


237.09 


Misc. construction expense 

Steam or hydraulic plant. . 


305.63 


305.63 


3,800.00 
13,075.00 


3,963.15 
14,916.41 


1,159.48 


Old plant 






3,053.47 














Total plant 


4,525.31 

472.74 


4,804.14 
762.56 


54,476.84 
384.25 


60,830.65 


19,247.37 


Bank and cash balance. . 




Securities and investments. . , 






Accounts receivable. . 






862.39 
281.10 


293.57 
8.47 




Inventories 


39.97 


29.07 




Sinking fund on local debentures. 




Equity in Hydro systems 

Other assets 


1,050.81 


1,570.99 




150.94 


513.89 


















Total assets 


6,088.83 
338.62 


7,166.76 


56,004.58 


61,283.63 


19,761.26 


Deficit 


267.79 












Total 


6,427.45 


7,166.76 


56,004.58 


61,283.63 


20,029.05 






Liabilities 

Debenture balance. . 


2,602.22 
1,356.50 


2,468.57 
1,440.20 






12,286.55 


Accounts payable 


2,103.54 


1,347.94 
188.81 
835.50 


2,638.05 


Bank overdraft 


31.11 


Other liabilities 




















Total liabilities 


3,958.72 


3,908.77 


2,103.54 


2,372.25 


14,955.71 






Reserves 
For depreciation 


933.66 
1,050.81 


1,057.66 
1,570.99 


16,579.00 


17,781.77 
150.94 


2,846.00 


For equity in H.E.P.C. system. . . 


513.89 






Total reserves 


1,984.47 


2,628.65 


16,579.00 


17,932.71 


3,359.89 






Surplus 

Debentures paid 


484.26 


617.91 






1,713.45 


Local sinking fund 








Additional operating surplus 




11.43 


37,322.04 


40,978.67 










Total surplus 


484.26 


629.34 


37,322.04 


40,978.67 


1,713.45 






Total liabilities, reserves & surplus 


6,427.45 


7,166.76 


56,004.58 


61,283.63 


20,029.05 


Per cent of net debt to total assets. 


65.0 


69.9 


3.7 


3.9 


76.0 



923 



HYDRO-ELECTRIC POWER COMMISSION 



339 



" A "—Continued 

of Hydro Municipalities as at December 31, 1922 



Tilbury 


Tillsonburg 
3,027 


Toronto 
522,942 


Toronto & 

Niagara 
Power Co'y- 


Toronto Twp. 


1922 


1921 


1922 


1921 


1922 


1922 


1921 


1922 


$ c. 
957.46 


$ c. 

2,224.27 

14,095.77 

27,953.99 


$ c. 

2,224.27 
13,875.77 
29,867.59 


$ c. 
1,701,146.65 
2,022,680.78 
3,407,521.69 
1,051,715.82 

937,604.29 
1,164,537.00 

727,541.22 


$ c. 
1,361,987.38 
2,719,597.75 
3,853,261.82 
1,118,283.91 
1,126,075.63 
1,346,538.27 
761,302.90 


$' c. 


$ c. 


$ c. 










6,783.41 




29,564.37 


86,031.95 




4,560.25 

3,726.43 

338.50 


7,723.49 
7,895.51 
2,261.84 


7,856.77 
8,579.39 
2,532.52 




11,976.79 
8,226.50 


16,872.36 
10,079.05 












1,159.48 


718.50 


718.50 


2,043,767.01 
38,517.07 
17,810.86 


2,247,233.88 




1,177.17 


290.24 


3,051.47 






33,967.96 


7,049,288. 18 


619.65 


619.65 










20,577.00 


62,873.37 

3,365.36 
9,000.00 
2,906.19 
1,828.52 
3,950.33 
7,193.69 


65,654.81 

1,628.68 
13,000.00 
3,619.50 
1,942.68 
4,535.73 
9,881.73 


13,112,842.39 
562,225.87 


14,568,249.50 
250,538.39 


7,049,288. 18 
194,307.70 


51,564.48 


113,893.25 
12,077.88 








2,106.73 


612,946.27 

786,212.80 

1,239,614.21 

243,279.95 


1,727,459.20 
747,682.56 

1,392,852.88 

495,823.30 

12,948.69 


388,921.93 
244,966.68 
482,881.12 


3,572.55 


5,202.97 








1,448.65 


6,643.71 


1,722.38 


1,904.73 
















24,132.38 


91,117.46 


100,263.13 


16,557,121.49 


19,195,554.52 


8,362,270.34 


61,780.74 


132,896.48 


















24,132.38 


91,117.46 


100,263.13 


16,557,121.49 


19,195,554.52 


8,362,270.34 


61,780.74 


132,896.48 


11,930.70 


28,681.79 
3,403.58 


27,749.84 
4,439.85 


10,737,923.27 
600,863.78 


11,238,650.51 
1,741,150.98 


6,376,000.00 
140,182.19 


9,724.53 

9,922.11 

254.46 


76,261.78 
995.00 


292.33 










505,608.73 




30,998.71 
















12,223.03 


32,085.37 


32,189.69 


11,844,395.78 


12,979,801.49 


6,547,180.90 


19,901.10 


77,256.78 


3,273.00 
1,448.65 


18,459.32 
7,193.69 


19,479.32 
9,881.73 


2,372,302.10 
243,279.95 


2,633,039.05 
495,823.30 


482,208.32 


21,852.93 
6,643.71 


24,281.48 
1,722.38 








4,721.65 


25,653.01 


29,361.05 


2,615,582.05 


3,128,862.35 


482,208.32 


28,496.64 


26,003.86 


2,069.30 


7,318.21 

3,950.33 

22,110.54 


8,250.16 

4,535.73 

25,926.50 


312,076.73 

1,239,614.21 

545,452.72 


434,349.49 
1,392,852.88 
1,259,688.31 


850,000.00 
482,881.12 


2,275.47 


2,738.22 


5,118.40 


11,107.53 


26,897.62 








7,187.70 


33,379.08 


38,712.39 


2,097,143.66 


3,086,890.68 


1,332,881.12 


13,383.00 


29,635.84 


24,132.38 


91,117.46 


100,263.13 


16,557,121.49 


19,195,554.52 


8,362,270.34 


61,780.74 


132,896.48 


53.9 


35.1 


35.6 


71.5 


69.4 


78.2 


32.2 


59.2 



340 



FIFTEENTH ANNUAL REPORT OF THE 



No. 49 



STATEMENT 
Comparative Balance Sheets of Electrical Departments 



NIAGARA 
SYSTEM— Continued 



Municipality 
Population 


Townsend Township 


Vaughan 


Township 


Walkerville 
7,303 




1921 


1922 


1921 


1922 


1921 


Assets 

Lands and buildings 


$ c. 


$ c. 


$ c. 


$ c. 


$ c. 
25,104.11 
57,391.73 
47,296.93 


Substation equipment 










Distribution system, overhead.. . . 
Distribution system, underground 
Line transformers 


853.71 


853.71 


3,727.12 


4,087.58 


1,154.45 

269.74 


1,250.09 
269.74 


3,170.69 

1,481.10 

122.54 


3,283.10 

2,187.09 

122.54 


34,333.12 


Meters 


36,261.45 


Street light equipment, regular . . 




Street light equip., ornamental. . 






51,000.00 

33,982.18 

*61,050.79 


Misc. construction expense. 
Steam or hydraulic plant 


85.55 


85.55 


499.90 


499.90 


Old plant . 










18,335.05 












Total plant 


2,363.45 


2,459.09 


9,001.35 
1,360.53 


10,180.21 
78.00 


364,755.36 
50.00 


Bank and cash balance . 


Securities and investments 








Accounts receivable 


1,242.55 


140.91 


1,046.29 


399.58 


65,650.91 


Inventories 


18,003.48 


Sinking fund on local debentures 










Equity in Hydro systems 

Other assets 


301.02 


374.26 


1,526.82 


1,984.05 


29,416.53 
1,553.82 












Total assets 


3,907.02 


2,974.26 


12,934.99 
3,492.98 


12,641.84 
3,954.08 


479,430. 10 


Deficit 












Total 


3,907.02 


2,974.26 


16,427.97 


16,595.92 


479,430. 10 






Liabilities 

Debenture balance 


2,374.98 


2,290.80 


7,340.80 
4,968.53 


7,091.90 
3,911.07 


170,489.74 


Accounts payable 


15,913.52 


Bank overdraft 






28,293.77 


Other liabilities 








48.18 














Total liabilities 


2,374.98 


2,290.80 


12,309.33 


11,051.15 


265,697.03 






Reserves 

For depreciation 


1,006.00 
301.02 




1,932.62 
1,526.82 


2,652.62 
1,984.05 


48,466.00 


For equity in H.E.P.C. system. . . 


374.26 


29,416.53 


Total reserves 


1,307.02 


374.26 


3,459.44 


4,636.67 


77,882.53 






Surplus 

Debentures paid 


225.02 


309.20 


659.20 


908.10 


23,769.26 


Local sinking fund 


1,437.54 


Additional operating surplus 










110,643.74 














Total surplus 


225.02 


309.20 


659.20 


908.10 


135,850.54 






Total liabilities, reserves & surplus 


3,907.02 


2,974.26 


16,427.97 


16,595.92 


479,430. 10 


Per cent of net debt to total assets. 


60.8 


88.1 


85.4 


105.6 


55.5 



""Includes Ford City and Sandwich East. 



1923 



HYDRO-ELECTRIC POWER COMMISSION 



341 



" A "— Continued 

of Hydro Municipalities as at December 31, 1922 



Walkerville 


Wallaceburg 
3,921 


Wardsville 
212 


Waterdown 
815 


1922 


1921 


1922 


1921 


1922 


1921 


1922 


$ c. 
115,734.07 


$ c. 

1,735.58 

2,234.15 

28,996.55 


$ c. 

1,735.58 

2,332.26 

30,092.15 


$ c. 


$ c. 


$ c. 


$ c. 
200.00 


66,590.05 
59,812.22 










4,487.90 


4,357.25 


9,037.72 


9,478.67 


39,425.69 
38,647.95 


15,868.00 

12,449.19 

1,723.26 


16,520.65 

12,950.24 

2,089.26 


601.14 
568.50 
489.73 


601.14 
546.12 
489.73 


1,751.00 

2,908.86 

199.07 


1,929.80 

3,307.85 

207.98 


51,000.00 




33,269.13 
2,986.49 


5,965.94 


6,008.74 


488.73 


488.73 


100.34 


100.34 


18,335.05 


19,485.49 


19,485.49 


193.94 


193.94 












425,800.65 
50.00 


88,458.16 
1,003.63 


91,214.37 
11,409.14 


6,829.94 
1,227.24 


6,676.91 
1,936.64 


13,996.99 

3,466.95 
3,500.00 


15,224.64 

2,874.00 
3,500.00 


94,395.92 


24,301.87 
6,811.06 


25,889.13 
5,533.48 






284.80 


37,210.28 






35.00 


35.00 










45,323.26 


1,727.78 
178.96 


6,031.76 




14.50 


1,406.13 


2,127.14 


3,989.59 


















606,769.70 


122,481.46 


140,077.88 


8,057.18 


8,628.05 


22,405.07 


24,045.58 
















606,769.70 


122,481.46 


140,077.88 


8,057.18 


8,628.05 


22,405.07 


24,045.58 


218,338.47 
34,781.20 
63,981.87 


65,767.82 
2,646.25 


64,283.81 
3,707.83 


7,562.40 
72.33 


7,344.92 
357.98 


5,037.15 
155.77 


4,570.67 
3.02 


53,646.60 




69.00 






















370,748.14 


68,414.07 


68,060.64 


7,634.73 


7,702.90 


5,192.92 


4,573.69 


48,834.52 


12,343.15 

1,727.78 


14,089.15 
6,031.76 




120.00 
14.50 


8,113.48 
1,406.13 


8,704.48 


45,323.26 




2,127.14 








94,157.78 


14,070.93 


20,120.91 




134.50 


9,519.61 


10,831.62 








30,920.53 


5,768.76 


7,252.77 




217.48 


2,962.85 


3,429.33 








110,943.25 


34,227.70 


44,643.56 


422.45 


573.17 


4,729.69 


5,210.94 


141,863.78 


39,996.46 


51,896.33 


422.45 


790.65 


7,692.54 


8,640.27 


606,769.70 


122,481.46 


140,077.88 


8,057.18 


8,628.05 


22,405.07 


24,045.58 


66.0 


56.0 


50.8 


94.7 


89.2 


23.2 


20.9 



342 



FIFTEENTH ANNUAL REPORT OF THE 



No. 49 



STATEMENT 
Comparative Balance Sheets of Electrical Departments 



NIAGARA 
SYSTEM— Continued 



Municipality 
Population 


Water ford 
1,112 


Waterloo 
5,976 


Waterloo 




1921 


1922 


1921 


1922 


1921 


Assets 

Lands and buildings 


$ c. 


$ c. 


$ c. 
13,489.34 
49,709.32 
44,956.55 


$ c. 
13,489.34 
49,794.43 
49,807.26 


$ c. 


Substation equipment. . . . 








Distribution system, overhead.. . . 
Distribution system, underground 
Line transformers 


7,715.29 


8,338.54 


334.38 


3,301.87 
2,899.98 
1,688.83 


3,517.10 
3,343.58 
1,721.08 


14,599.93 

17,595.34 

5,760.95 


18,777.65 

19,498.92 

5,854.90 


1,015.13 


Meters 


355.49 


Street light equipment, regular. ... 
Street light equip., ornamental 






Misc. construction expense 

Steam or hydraulic plant 


442.53 


442.53 


4,273.63 

2,483.64 

14,529.03 


4,039.63 


33.88 


Old plant 


607.69 


607.69 


26,860.67 








Total plant 


16,656.19 

67.53 

3,000.00 

312.10 


17,970.52 

810.26 

3,000.00 

6.74 


177,395.73 
6,822.06 


188,122.80 
1,022.27 


1,738.88 


Bank and cash balance. 








Accounts receivable . 


5,319.75 
6,026.74 
3,456.00 
7,823.50 


6,674.75 

6,415.83 

3,744.00 

12,951.62 




Inventories 












Equity in Hydro systems 

Other assets 


260.46 


1,104.40 


















Total assets 

Deficit 


20,296.28 


22,891.92 


206,843.78 


218,931.27 


1,738.88 














Total 


20,296.28 




206,843.78 


218,931.27 


1,738.88 






Liabilities 






94,529.54 
3,249.59 


91,945.69 
5,702.39 




Debenture balance 




Accounts payable 


740.46 


242.76 


1,738.88 


Bank overdraft 




Other liabilities 


1,006.00 




















Total liabilities 


1,746.46 


242.76 


97,779.13 


97,648.08 


1,738.88 






Reserves 

For depreciation 


1,484.40 
260.46 


3,155.40 
1,104.40 


43,052.63 
7,823.50 


46,555.09 
12,951.62 




For equity in H.E.P.C. system. . . 






Total reserves 


1,744.86 


4,259.80 


50,876.13 


59,506.71 








Surplus 

Debentures paid 


7,745.53 


7,745.53 


11,470.46 

3,456.00 

43,262.06 


14,054.31 

3,744.00 

43,978.17 




Local sinking fund 




Additional operating surplus 


9,059.43 


10,643.83 






Total surplus 


16,804.96 


18,389.36 


58,188.52 


61,776.48 








Total liabilities, reserves & surplus 


20,296.28 


22,891.92 


206,843.78 


218,931.27 


1,738.88 


Per cent of net debt to total assets. 


8.6 


1.1 


47.2 


47.4 


100.0 



1923 



HYDRO-ELECTRIC POWER COMMISSION 



343 



" A "—Continued 

of Hydro Municipalities as at December 31, 1922 



Township 


Watford 
1,039 


Welland 
8,880 


Wellesley Police Village 


1922 


1921 


1922 


1921 


1922 


1921 


1922 


$ c. 


$ c. 


$ c. 


$ c. 

27,977.28 

49,160.74 

102,108.17 


$ c. 

27,978.19 

49,403 . 70 

107,066.55 


$ c. 


$ c. 












334.38 


8,008.99 


8,928.63 


4,363.44 


5,030.72 


1,015.13 
355.49 


2,489.96 

2,810.81 

520.67 


2,816.11 

3,183.70 

597.42 


26,131.54 

26,354.99 

4,112.61 


28,795.44 

28,675.11 

4,537.55 


1,311.47 

1,266.99 

386.55 


1,499.76 

1,587.90 

425.70 






33.88 


1,305.70 


1,305.70 


13,017.21 


12,810.80 


128.57 


128.57 




657.44 


657.44 




















1,738.88 


15,793.57 


17,489.00 
147.02 


248,862.54 
961.54 


259,267.34 
100.00 


7,457.02 
4,110.59 


8,672.65 
2,748.08 












1,189.12 


54,651.84 
6,711.41 

31,475.39 
4,628.01 
4,143.24 


71,254.76 
3,838.05 

35,597.72 
6,163.41 
4,368.34 


38.66 








54.31 












681.23 




189.59 




756.95 




















2,420.11 


15,793.57 


19,014.73 


351,433.97 


380,589.62 
1,542.31 


11,606.27 


12,231.99 














2,420.11 


15,793.57 


19,014.73 


351,433.97 


382,131.93 


11,606.27 


12,231.99 




8,024.54 
929.51 
170.47 


7,629.10 
595.37 


200,000.00 

28,383.98 

9,797.35 

16,143.24 


199,048.54 

50,164.81 

6,354.53 

26,968.59 


6,365.29 


6,077.86 


1,738.88 


193.12 


























1,738.88 


9,124.52 


8,224.47 


254,324.57 


282,536.47 


6,365.29 


6,270.98 




1,993.00 


1,892.67 
189.59 


51,431.97 
4,628.01 


56,882.87 
6,163.41 


1,517.00 


1,735.00 
756.95 


681.23 










681.23 


1,993.00 


2,082.26 


56,059.98 


63,046.28 


1,517.00 


2,491.95 




1,688.67 


2,084.11 




951.46 
35,597.72 


1,134.71 


1,422.14 




31,475.39 
9,574.03 






2,987.38 


6,623.89 


2,589.27 


2,046.92 








4,676.05 


8,708.00 


41,049.42 


36,549.18 


3,723.98 


3,469.06 






2,420.11 


15,793.57 


19,014.73 


351,433.97 


382,131.93 


11,606.27 


12,231.99 


71.8 


57.8 


43.7 


72.4 


75.9 


54.8 


54.7 



344 



FIFTEENTH ANNUAL REPORT OF THE 



No. 49 



STATEMENT 
Comparative Balance Sheets of Electrical Departments 



NIAGARA 
SYSTEM— Continued 


Municipality 
Population 


West Lome 
803 


Weston 
3,299 


Windsor 
38,530 




1921 


1922 


1921 


1922 


1921 


Assets 

Lands and buildings. . . . 


$ c. 


$ c. 


$ c. 

3,230.94 

13,220.54 

22,222.34 


$ c. 

3,230.94 

24,631.95 

27,488.26 


$ c. 

14,167.01 

95,599.89 

286,227.53 


Substation equipment 






Distribution system, overhead.. . . 
Distribution system, underground 
Line transformers 


6,195.23 


6,298.51 


2,641.15 

1,804.12 

566.10 


2,737.62 

1,953.88 

567.97 


16,101.80 
9,952.70 
2,833.16 
6,481.83 
3,966.54 


17,234.20 
11,357.63 

3,960.81 
12,654.74 

4,626.86 


134,000.19 
129,726.85 

12,404.28 
245,094.02 

75,055.07 


Meters 


Street light equipment, regular. . . 
Street light equip., ornamental 


Misc. construction expense 

Steam or hydraulic plant. . 


199.49 


234.43 


Old plant. . 


1,250.00 


1,250.00 






120,301.54 








Total plant 


12,656.09 

1,507.51 

2,000.00 

2,184.30 

114.89 


13,042.41 

1,408.66 
4,000.00 
1,639.56 

48.24 


78,009.85 
1,689.02 


105,185.39 
5,515.73 


1,112,576.38 

75.00 

♦7,271.12 

137,632.82 

101,596.70 

21,387.32 

20,060.64 


Bank and cash balance 




Accounts receivable 


1,663.63 
315.73 


4,028.71 
325.43 


Inventories 


Sinking fund on local debentures 


Equity in Hydro systems 




553.28 


7,688.74 


11,795.55 


Other assets . . . 


160.00 












Total assets 


18,622.79 


20,692.15 


89,366.97 


126,850.81 


1,400,599.98 


Deficit 














Total 


18,622.79 


20,692.15 


89,366.97 


126,850.81 


1,400,599.98 




Liabilities 

Debenture balance 


7,429.56 
979.99 


7,294.15 


13,311.75 
3,636.46 


37,907.21 
8,344.64 


799,122.27 
36,246.62 
16,295.99 

232,325.82 


Accounts payable 


Bank overdraft 


Other liabilities 




















Total liabilities 


8,409.55 


7,294.15 


16,948.21 


46,251.85 


1,083,990.70 




Reserves 

For depreciation 


1,462.00 


1,745.00 
553.28 


20,735.81 

7,688.74 


23,123.91 
11,795.55 


78,051.74 
20,060.64 


For equity in H.E.P.C. system. . . 






Total reserves 


1,462.00 


2,298.28 


28,424.55 


34,919.46 


98,112.38 




Surplus 

Debentures paid 


570.44 


705.85 


6,656.13 


7,060.67 


40,877.76 

28,658.44 

148,960.70 


Local sinking fund. . 


Additional operating surplus 


8,180.80 


10,393.87 


37,338.08 


38,618.83 


Total surplus 


8,751.24 


11,099.72 


43,994.21 


45,679.50 


218,496.90 




Total liabilities, reserves & surplus 


18,622.79 


20,692.15 


89,366.97 


126,850.81 


1,400,599.98 


Per cent of net debt to total assets. 


45.2 


36.2 


19.0 


40.3 


77.5 



* Special Sinking Fund. 



1923 



HYDRO-ELECTRIC POWER COMMISSION 



345 



" A "—Continued 

of Hydro Municipalities as at December 31, 1922 



Windsor 


Woodbridge 
679 


Woodstock 
10,164 


Wyoming 
489 


1922 


1921 


1922 


1921 


1922 


1921 


1922 


$ c. 

86,982.82 

175,891.72 


$ c. 


$ c. 


$ c. 
28,776.51 
49,205.24 
65,178.43 


$ c. 
28,776.51 
49,789.53 
71,926.46 


$ c. 


$ c. 










349,656.18 


7,578.75 


8,400.65 


6,272.26 


6,359.68 


169,467.90 
153,064.83 

20,282.14 
268,526.77 

82,176/69 


2,633.68 
2,041.30 

355.58 


2,937.02 

2,382.49 

369.30 


31,604.64 
31,441.11 
10,699.09 


34,993.59 
34,760.40 
10,699.09 


1,012.00 

1,365.59 

262.32 


1,012.00 

1,487.36 

262.32 


642.82 


642.82 


17,832.81 
14,908.62 


18,359.55 
14,908.62 


805 . 20 


805.20 


120,301.54 






















1,426,350.59 
11,193.03 


13,252.13 

6,054.23 
500.00 
229.68 


14,732.28 

1,951.99 

4,993.58 

206.55 

44.41 


249,646.45 

1,050.74 

15,000.00 

161.37 

4,193.77 
30,187.49 

8,796.48 


264,213.75 
944.37 


9,717.37 
549.01 


9,926.56 
1,156.22 


215,519.30 




1,100.00 


1,920.00 


111,138.41 


4,196.11 
22,892.37 
16,393.42 




40,298.24 








44,446.15 


657.90 


1,576.49 




433.23 
















1,848,945.72 


20,693.94 


23,505.30 


309,036.30 


308,640.02 


11,366.38 
1,343.34 


13,436.01 
1,229.01 












1,848,945.72 


20,693.94 


23,505.30 


309,036.30 


308,640.02 


12,709.72 


14,665.02 


1,082,316.60 
65,398.08 


7,691.71 
103.15 


7,529.91 
839.21 


77,385.63 
12,188.07 


67,385.63 
5,235.27 


8,288.60 
1,572.97 


7,895.30 
2,995.87 






























1,412,789.18 


7,794.86 


8,369.12 


89,573.70 


72,620.90 


9,861.57 


10,891.17 


96,199.57 
44,446.15 


3,147.01 
657.90 


3,309.17 
1,576.49 


51,961.40 
8,796.48 


56,194.71 
16,393.42 


1,436.75 


1,535.92 
433.23 








140,645.72 


3,804.91 












57,683.43 
40,298.24 


808.26 


970.06 


30,000.00 
30,187.49 
98,517.23 


40,000.00 

22,892.37 

100,538.62 


1,411.40 


1,804.70 


197,529.15 


8,285.91 


9,280.46 












295,510.82 


9,094.17 


10,250.52 


158,704.72 


163,430.99 


1,411.40 


1,804.70 


1,848,945.72 


20,693.94 


23,505.30 


309,036.30 


308,640.02 


12,709.72 


14,665.02 


78.4 


37.6 


38.2 


29.8 


24.8 


86.7 


83.7 



346 



FIFTEENTH ANNUAL REPORT OF THE 



No. 49 



STATEMENT 
Comparative Balance Sheets of Electrical Departments 



NIAGARA 
SYSTEM— Continued 



Municipality 
Population 


York Township 


Zurich Police Village 




1921 


1922 


1921 


1922 


Assets 

Lands and buildings 


$ c. 


$ c. 


$ c. 


$ c 


Substation equipment. . 










Distribution system, overhead.. . . 
Distribution system, underground 
Line transformers 


169,086.51 


219,491.64 


3,745.67 


3,822.92 






991.96 

1,149.14 

395.77 


991.96 


Meters 






1,242.49 


Street light equipment, regular. . . 
Street light equip., ornamental . 


3,752.94 


7,077.12 


395.77 


Misc. construction expense 

Steam or hydraulic plant 


6,636.11 


6,665.16 


273.30 


273.30 


Old plant 






150.00 


150.00 










Total plant 


179,475.56 
19,772.79 


233,233.92 


6,705.84 

802.86 
4,000.00 


6,876.44 


Bank and cash balance. 


1,063.42 


Securities and investments 




4,000.00 


Accounts receivable 


1,090.19 


8,954.72 


191.16 


Inventories 




Sinking fund on local debentures 










Equity in Hydro systems . 








162.02 


Other assets 


124.46 


72.58 












Total assets 


200,463.00 


242,261.22 


11,508.70 


12,293.04 


Deficit 














Total 


200,463.00 


242,261.22 


11,508.70 


12,293.04 






Liabilities 

Debenture balance 


200,000.00 


194,563.10 

33,131.65 

853.41 

463.00 


5,330.28 
533.38 


5,233.45 


Accounts payable 




Bank overdraft. . . . 






Other liabilities 


463.00 












Total liabilities 




229,011.16 


5,863.66 


5,233.45 






For depreciation 




3,994.00 


1,008.00 


1,175.00 


For equity in H.E.P.C. system 




162.02 












Total reserves 




3,994.00 


1,008.00 










Surplus 

Debentures paid 




5,436.90 


261.33 


358.16 


Local sinking fund 






Additional operating surplus 




3,819.16 


4,375.71 


5,364.41 








Total surplus 




9,256.06 


4,637.04 


5,722.57 








Total liabilities, reserves & surplus 


200,463.00 


242,261.22 


11,508.70 


12,293.04 


Per cent of net debt to total assets. 


100.0 


94.5 


50.9 


43.1 



1923 



HYDRO-ELECTRIC POWER COMMISSION 



347 



44 A"— Continued 

of Hydro Municipalities as at December 31, 1922 





SEVERN 
SYSTEM 


NIAGARA SYSTEM 
SUMMARY 


Alliston 
1,321 


Barrie 
6,888 


Beeton 
586 


1921 


1922 


1921 


1922 


1921 


1922 


1921 


1922 


$ c. 
• 2,818,744.64 
5,133,322.15 
6,433,499.32 
1,264,151.25 
2,538,437.83 
2,919,432.63 
1,134,755.32 
529,837.95 


$ c. 
2,885,585.33 
4,756,865.14 
9,069,206.23 
1,365,112.82 
3,018,885.71 
3,340,018.48 
1,210,243.65 
585,333.25 
2,980,590.12 
32,811.52 
7,701,621.91 


$ c. 


$ c. 


$ c. 

12,403.21 

4,682.98 

32,806.69 


$ c. 

12,403.21 

4,682.98 

36,032.98 


$ c. 


$ c. 


675.73 
20,510.82 


675.73 
20,662 . 10 


428.50 
10,278.29 


428.50 
10,434.27 


4,492.26 
4,450.97 
1,330.21 


4,599.67 
4,621.14 
1,354.92 


7,550.38 

23,131.94 

3,436.79 


9,812.65 

25,263.53 

4,004.51 


1,731.74 
800.27 
913.98 


1,731.74 

1,015.45 

913.98 


2,756,487.60 
169,519.19 


2,856.02 


3,105.92 


1,153.73 


766.23 


1,432.19 


1,432.19 


613,619.05 


8,079.10 


8,146.49 


44,593.61 


41,587.61 










26,311,806.93 
769,442.64 


36,946,274.16 

820,900.60 
310,880.37 
3,436,324.31 
1,584,368.95 
2,771,893.70 
1,391,696.62 
224,134.27 


42,395.11 
1,570.27 


43,165.97 
1,048.99 


129,759.33 


134,553.70 

1,290.03 

44,570.38 

9,085.88 

2,670.51 


15,584.97 
.01 


15,956.13 
411.99 


321,475.53 


45,000.00 
8,648.80 
2,048.92 




1,881,013.04 
1,333,781 .17 


277.64 


307.60 

151.83 

2,167.13 


270.07 


270.07 
53.69 


1,948,212.30 
702,052.61 


1,688.30 






4,746.99 
14.22 


7,412.47 
13,118.85 






77,870.57 




















33,345,654. 79 
22,682.87 


47,486,472.98 
27,564.75 


45,931.32 
7,772.08 


46,841.52 
3,630.81 


190,218.26 


212,701.82 


15,855.05 
7,137.51 


16,691.88 
2,587 53 








33,368,337.66 


47,514,037.73 


53,703.40 


50,472.33 


190,218.26 


212,701.82 


22,992.56 


19,279.41 


18,311,803.60 

1,372,855.40 

727,938.21 


26,718,520.38 

3,261,878.53 

395,035.84 

562,555.88 


39,782.50 
7,952.10 


39,551.95 
3,362.20 


30,557.28 

6,435.76 

811.50 

350.00 


28,480.45 
2,938.27 


14,288.26 
6,276.56 


14,026.90 
2,439.00 


898,824.29 
























21,311,421.50 


30,937,990.63 


47,734.50 


42,914.15 


38,154.54 


31,418.72 


20,564.82 


16,465.90 


4,649,746.01 
706,731.15 


5,594,142.01 
1,391,696.62 


4,063.00 


4,863.00 


24,571.40 
4,746.99 


27,309.40 
7,412.47 


1,716.00 


1,840.41 












5,356,477.16 


6,985,838.63 


4,063.00 


4,863.00 


29,318.39 


34,721.87 


1,716.00 


1,840.41 


1,320,806.67 
1,948,212.30 


2,488,940.38 
2,771,893.70 
4,329,374.39 


217.50 
1,688.30 


448.05 
2,247.13 


56,442.72 


58,519.55 


711.74 


973.10 


3,431,420.03 


66,302.61 


88,041.68 
















6,700,439.00 


9,590,208.47 


1,905.80 


2,695.18 


122,745.33 


146,561.23 


711.74 


973.10 


33,368,337.66 


47,514,037.73 


53,703.40 


50,472.33 


190,218.26 


212,701.82 


22,992.56 


19,279.41 


63.8 


67.1 


104.0 


99.4 


20.5 


15.3 


130.0 


98.6 



348 



FIFTEENTH ANNUAL REPORT OF THE 



No. 49 



STATEMENT 
Comparative Balance Sheets of Electrical Departments 



SEVERN 

SYSTEM— Continued 


Municipality 
Population 


Bradford 
1,028 


Coldwater 
647 


Colling- 
wood 
6,237 




1921 


1922 


1921 


1922 


1921 


Assets 

Lands and buildings 


$ c. 


$ c. 


$ c. 
275.00 


$ c. 
275.00 


$ c. 
11,819.32 
11,212.59 
36,711.44 


Substation equipment 


388.50 
14,133.28 


388.50 
14,474.97 


Distribution system, overhead.. . . 
Distribution system, underground 
Line transformers 


6,099.18 


6,348.62 


1,311.23 

1,757.43 
544.95 


1,362.34 

1,934.06 

544.95 


2,129.32 
1,607.51 

372.82 


2,472.67 

1,780.20 

372.82 


10,187.24 

17,254.49 

2,641.67 


Meters 


Street light equipment, regular. . . 
Street light equip., ornamental 


Misc. construction expense 

Steam or hydraulic plant. . 


1,691.36 


1,691.36 


132.53 


132.53 


5,797.95 


Old plant 










352.17 












Total plant 


19,826.75 
75.83 


20,396.18 
502.27 


10,616.36 
765.42 


11,381.84 
1,151.48 


95,976.87 


Bank and cash balance 


Securities and investments 


5,000.00 

6,682.77 

702.92 


Accounts receivable 


480.20 
108.44 


340.20 
42.41 


1,928.74 


4,494.08 


Inventories 


Sinking fund on local debentures 






Equity in Hydro systems 






696.55 


1,018.92 


14,945.96 


Other assets 


















Total assets 


20,491.22 
10,023.83 


21,281.06 
7,636.86 


14,007.07 


18,046.32 


123,308.52 


Deficit 










Total 


30,515.05 


28,917 9? 


14,007.07 


18,046.32 


123,308.52 




Liabilities 


15,022.19 
12,821.05 


18,404.03 
7,184.60 


6,060.48 
2,453.31 


5,912.17 
1,536.34 


20,901.03 

12,471.52 

1,147.54 


Debenture balance 


Accounts payable 


Bank overdraft 


Other liabilities 






















Total liabilities 


27,843.24 


25,588.63 


8,513.79 


7,448.51 


34,520.09 




For depreciation 


2,094.00 


2,533.32 


3,458.37 
696.55 


3,793.12 
1,018.92 


24,105.43 
14,945.96 


For equity in H.E.P.C. system . . 








Total reserves 


2,094.00 


2,533.32 


4,154.92 




39,051.39 




Surplus 

Debentures paid 


577.81 


795.97 


939.52 


1,087.83 


18,509.26 


Local sinking fund 


Additional operating surplus 






398.84 


4,697.94 


31,227.78 








Total surplus 


577.81 


795.97 


1,338.36 


5,785.77 


49,737.04 




Total liabilities, reserves & surplus 


30,515.05 


28,917.92 


14,007.07 


18,046.32 


123,308.52 


Per cent of net debt to total assets. 


135.6 


120.2 


60.8 


43.7 


28.1 



1923 



HYDRO-ELECTRIC POWER COMMISSION 



349 



" A "—Continued 

of Hydro Municipalities as at December 31, 1922 



Collingwood 


Cookstown Police Village 


Creemore 
540 


Elmvale Police Village 


1922 


1921 


1922 


1921 


1922 


1921 


1922 


$ c. 
12,679.34 
11,212.59 


$ c. 

60.00 

392.95 

8,403.84 


$ c. 

60.00 

392.95 

8,457.09 


$ c. 


$ c. 


$ c. 
106.25 


$ c. 
106 25 








37,570.67 


4,982.12 


5,013.28 


6,656.60 


6,662.94 


11,099.25 

18,451.39 

2,641.67 


1,720.59 

1,124.92 

514.21 


1,720.59 

1,165.08 

514.21 


1,161.81 

1,564.80 

272.07 


1,161.81 

1,801.75 

272.07 


2,203.94 

1,800.66 

317.98 


2,203.94 

1,900.79 

317.98 


7,945.11 


1,453.55 


1,464.15 


185.41 


185.41 


455.93 


455.93 


529.75 






2,651.15 


2,651.15 
















102,129.77 
8,476.05 


13,670.06 
800.57 


13,774.07 
450.07 


10,817.36 
2,834.69 


11,085.47 
5,537.73 


11,541.36 
805.96 


11,647.83 
2,419.17 


24,254.96 
2,385 68 


197.96 


1,310.65 


73.34 
27.51 


2,991.89 


1,008.65 
194.11 


3,206.15 
192 38 












21,355.66 






769.52 
1,466.34 


1,198.58 


1,030.92 


1,601 67 






















158,602.12 


14,668.59 
2,160.68 


15,534.79 


15,988.76 


20,813.67 


14,581.00 


19,067.20 














158,602.12 


16,829.27 


15,534.79 


15,988.76 


20,813.67 


14,581.00 


19,067.20 


19,248.65 
908 . 24 


9,014.23 

5,870.27 


12,837.67 


5,016.88 


4,751.20 


5,838.24 


5,674.78 










































20,156.89 


14,884.50 


12,837.67 


5,016.88 


4,751.20 


5,838.24 


5,674.78 


26,745.43 
21,355.66 


1,459.00 


1,761.00 


2,087.37 
769.52 


2,153.26 
1,198.58 


3,307.00 
1,030.92 


3,657.00 
1,601.67 
















3,351.84 




5,258.67 


20,161.64 


485.77 


627.33 


1,483.12 


1,748.80 


1,161.76 


1,325.22 


70,182.50 




308.79 


6,631.87 


10,961.83 


3,243.08 


6,808 53 








90,344.14 


485 . 77 


936.12 


8,114.99 


12,710.63 


4,404.84 


8,133.75 


158,602.12 


16,829.27 


15,534.79 


15,988.76 


20,813.67 


14,581.00 


19,067.20 


14,7 


101.2 


82.6 


31.2 


24.2 


40.0 


32.5 



350 



FIFTEENTH ANNUAL REPORT OF THE 



No. 49 



STATEMENT 
Comparative Balance Sheets of Electrical Departments 



SEVERN 

SYSTEM— Continued 



Municipality 
Population 


Midland 
7,022 


Penetanguishene 
3,920 


Port 
576 




1921 


1922 


1921 


1922 


1921 


Assets 

Lands and buildings 


$ c. 
10,864.80 
19,926.49 
65,853.32 


$ c. 
10,864.80 
20,644.94 
68,734.02 


$ c. 

2,151.00 

3,507.71 

32,711.06 


$ c. 

2,151.00 

3,507.71 

34,552.61 


$ c. 

202 60 


Substation equipment 




Distribution system, overhead.. . . 
Distribution system, underground 


6,017.49 


Line transformers 


13,686.22 

20,644.80 

4,707.93 


13,686.22 

22,353.31 

4,917.13 


9,817.36 
8,964.08 
2,312.30 


11,388.68 
9,882.70 
2,314.30 


339 98 


Meters 


1,119.26 
166.73 


Street light equipment, regular. . . 
Street light equip., ornamental. . . 


Misc. construction expense 

Steam or hydraulic plant 


6,301.33 


7,042.58 


823.69 


1,221.91 


513.92 


Old plant 


14,515.62 


14,515.62 


2,374.20 


2,374.20 








Total plant 


156,500.51 
8,007.64 


162,758.72 
6,839.91 


62,661.40 
2,214.36 


67,393.11 


8,359.98 


Bank and cash balance 


431.85 


Securities and investments 






Accounts receivable 


4,470.94 
7,249.34 


23,971.88 
11,348.60 


2,247.68 
956.94 


22,356.68 
1,404.28 


231.49 


Inventories 




Sinking fund on local debentures. 




Equity in Hydro systems 

Other assets 


8,943.52 


13,054.33 


10,721.47 


13,530.85 


210.09 














Total assets 


185,171.95 


217,973.44 


78,801.85 


104,684.92 


9,233.41 


Deficit 


2,395.69 














Total 


185,171.95 


217,973.44 


78,801.85 


104,684.92 


11,629.10 






Liabilities 

Debenture balance 


53,940.34 
35,957.11 


81,253.83 


23,543.67 
9,136.91 


22,637.78 

10,000.00 

1,006.25 


6,351.89 


Accounts payable 


2,887.01 


Bank overdraft . 






Other liabilities 






















Total liabilities 


89,897.45 


81,253.83 


32,680.58 


33,644.03 


9,238.90 






Reserves 

For depreciation 


30,703.31 

8,943.52 


34,488.31 
13,054.33 


18,926.48 
10,721.47 


20,910.48 
13,530.85 


1,232.00 


For equity in H.E.P.C. system. . . 


210.09 


Total reserves 


39,646.83 


47,542.64 


29,647.95 










Surplus 

Debentures paid 


28,129.65 


30,816.16 


7,456.33 


8,362.22 


948.11 






Additional operating surplus 


27,498.02 


58,360.81 


9,016.99 


28,237.34 






Total surplus 


55,627.67 


89,176.97 


16,473.32 


36,599.56 


948.11 






Total liabilities, reserves & surplus 


185,171.95 


217,973.44 


78,801.85 


104,684.92 


11,629.10 


Per cent of net debt to total assets. 


48.5 


39.6 


41.5 


36.9 


100.2 



1923 



HYDRO-ELECTRIC POWER COMMISSION 



35 



" A "—Continued 

of Hydro Municipalities as at December 31, 1922 





McNicoll 


Stayner 
1,004 


Thornton Police Village 


Tottenham 
512 


1922 


1921 


1922 


1921 


1922 


1921 


1922 


$ c. 
202.60 


$ c. 


$ c. 


$ c. 


$ c. 


$ c. 


$ c. 




200.00 
8,526.56 


200.00 

8,889.58 






358.50 
7,437.89 


358 50 


6,062.34 


5,923.77 


5,923.77 


7,641.79 


339.98 

1,135.12 

166.73 


2,761.04 

2,349.30 

529.31 


2,867.83 

2,623.23 

790.02 


606.88 
351.87 
375.90 


606.88 
369.01 
375.90 


1,117.48 

1,315.78 

460.17 


1,117.48 

1,477.66 

460.17 


546.42 


310.33 


310.33 


300.35 


300.35 


1,287.37 


1,287.37 




4,132.41 


4,132.41 






361.45 


361.45 










8,453.19 
191.18 


18,808.95 
2,051.21 


19,813.40 
2,106.76 


7,558.77 
173.29 


7,575.91 
186.68 


12,338.64 
162.61 


12,654.42 
1,199.17 




100.00 
145.55 


3,917.77 
60.15 






168.14 






















346.30 


840.89 


1,665.12 


































8,990.67 
300.82 


21,946.60 


27,563.20 


7,732.06 
3,079.20 


7,762.59 
2,905.07 


12,669.39 
6,201.73 


13,853.59 
4,454.51 










9,291.49 


21,946.60 












6,099.85 
211.19 


10,812.68 
718.56 


10,240.83 


7,166.42 
2,421.26 


6,942.69 
2,096.66 


8,840.65 
7,399.58 


8,258.48 
6,658.18 




































6,311.04 


11,531.24 


10,240.83 


9,587.68 


9,039.35 


16,240.23 


14,916.66 


1,434.00 
346.30 


3,472.88 
840.89 


3,905.88 
1,665.12 


890.00 


1,071.00 


1,004.44 


1,182.82 


























1,200.15 


3,187.32 


3,759.17 


333.58 


557.31 


1,626.45 


2,208.62 




2,914.27 


7,992.20 




















1,200.15 


6,101.59 


11,751.37 


333.58 


557.31 


1,626.45 


2,208.62 


9,291.49 


21,946.60 


27,563.20 


10,811.26 


10,667.66 


18,871.12 


18,308.10 


73.1 


52.6 


39.7 


124.2 


119.3 


128.5 


107.7 



352 



FIFTEENTH ANNUAL REPORT OF THE 



No. 



STATEMENT 
Comparative Balance Sheets of Electrical Department 



SEVERN 

SYSTEM— Continu ed 


Municipality 
Population 


Victoria Harbor 
1,485 


Waubaushene 
Police Village 


SEVERN 

SYSTEM 

SUMMARY 




1921 


1922 


1921 


1922 


1921 


1922 


Assets 


$ c. 


$ c. 


$ c. 


$ c. 


$ c. 

37,882.18 

41,773.95 

274,860.30 


$ 

38,742.: 

42,492.. 

285,390., 












Distribution system, overhead.. . . 
Distribution system, underground 


4,950.98 


5,037.17 


2,856.97 


2,892.10 


Line transformers 


825.92 

1,676.40 

145.69 


825.92 

1,825.11 

145.69 


416.56 
918.54 
159.22 


490.42 
918.54 
159.22 


62,059.95 
90,833.05 
19,201.93 


67,488.1 
98,468.1 
20,266. 


Meters 


Street light equipment, regular. . . 
Street light equip., ornamental . . . 


Misc. construction expense 

Steam or hydraulic plant 


642.64 


642.64 


257.66 


257.66 


25,595.96 


28,788. 


Old plant 










77,059.71 


74,298. 












Total plant 


8,121.40 
427.67 


8,476.53 
2,060.39 


4,608.95 
1,293.95 


4,717.94 
1,638.70 


629,267.00 

21,640.71 
50,000.00 
28,736.98 
11,433.73 
1,688.30 
43,389.95 
14.22 


655,934. 

35,510. 
44,570. 
98,704. 
18,309. 
2,167. 
61,979. 
13,118. 


Bank and cash balance 


Securities and investments 


Accounts receivable 


458.77 


1,532.11 




664.50 




Sinking fund on local debentures. 










Equity in Hydro systems 

Other assets 


152.22 


523.17 


167.78 


272.25 












Total assets 


9,160.06 


12,592.20 


6,070.68 


7,293.39 


786,170.89 
38,770.72 


930,294. 
21,515. 


Deficit 












Total 


9,160.06 


12,592.20 


6,070.68 


7,293.39 


824,941.61 


951,809. 




Liabilities 

Debenture balance 


5,459.63 
220.00 


4,958.96 


2,836.33 
330.53 


2,701.36 


265,189.07 

113,131.53 

1,959.04 


291,981. 

37,334. 

1,006. 


Accounts payable 


Bank overdraft. . . 




Other liabilities 




















Total liabilities 


5,679.63 


4,958.96 


3,166.86 


2,701.36 


380,629.64 


330,322. 


Reserves 

For depreciation 


1,218.89 
152.22 


1,790.37 
523.17 


917.00 
167.78 


892.51 
272.25 


125,578.57 
43,389.95 


140,331. 
61,979. 


For equity in H.E.P.C. system. . . 


Total reserves 


1,371.11 


2,313.54 


1,084.78 










Surplus 

Debentures paid 


1,040.37 


1,541.04 


663.67 


798.64 


124,158.31 
149,496.84 


134,930.1 

279,370.1 


Local sinking fund 


Additional operating surplus 


1,068.95 


3,778.66 


1,155.37 


2,628.63 


Total surplus 


2,109.32 


5,319.70 


1,819.04 


3,427.27 


275,343.45 


419,176.1 




Total liabilities, reserves & surplus 


9,160.06 


12,592.20 


6,070.68 


7,293.39 


824,941.61 


951,809.$ 


Per cent of net debt to total assets. 


63.0 


41.1 


52.2 


38.5 


48.5 


38.1 



923 



HYDRO-ELECTRIC POWER COMMISSION 



353 



>" A "— Continued 
of Hydro Municipalities as at December 31, 1922 



EUGENIA 
SYSTEM 



Arthur 

1,222 


Chatsworth 

287 


Chesley 
1,803 


Derby Township 


1921 


1922 


1921 


1922 


1921 


1922 


1921 


1922 


$ c. 


$ c. 


$ c. 
65.00 


$ c. 
65.00 


$ c. 


$ c. 


$ c. 


$ c. 






595.98 
16,960.12 


595.98 
17,263.20 






15,075.50 


15,328.82 


3,677.56 


3,717.09 


90.41 


90.41 


3,849.78 

2,073.40 

539 71 


3,849.78 

2,216.34 

609.16 


667.79 
573.08 

207.29 


667.69 
606.48 

207.29 


3,880.77 
3,845.01 

824 . 75 


4,117.30 
4,193.38 
1,017.36 


73.32 
32.05 


73.32 
32.05 








245.82 


245.82 


385.90 


385.90 


3,089.66 


3,089.66 


14.68 


14.68 


1,101.47 


1,101.47 






5,503.60 


5,503.60 














22,885.68 
163.60 


23,351.39 

25.25 


5,576.52 
586.14 


5,649.45 
260.98 


34,699.89 


35,780.56 
1,144.57 


210.46 


210.46 










219.09 


46.45 


425.52 


512.48 




214.30 
155.00 






25.00 


275.00 










708.34 
207.96 


1,104.21 
442.01 








1,640.04 




1,777.53 






























23,293.37 
16,927.24 


25,063.13 
13,735.44 


7,504.47 
1,790.61 


7,969.13 
617.89 


34,974.89 
4,570.83 


39,071.96 


210.46 


210.46 










40,220.61 


38,798.57 


9,295.08 


8,587.02 


39,545.72 


39,071.96 


210.45 


210.46 


19,774.14 


19,434.97 
11,556.03 


5,321.60 
1,963.64 


5,278.83 
548.23 


22,437.65 

6,712.01 

352.71 


21,432.23 

57.28 






15,183.61 


210.46 


210.46 
































34,957.75 


30,991.00 


7,285.24 


5,827.06 


29,552.37 


21,489.51 


210.46 


210.46 


4,037.00 


4,602.50 
1,640.04 


1,015.14 
207.96 


1,092.57 

442; 01 


4,981.00 


5,708.00 

1,777.53 




















4,037.00 


6,242.54 


1,223.10 


1,534.58 


4,981.00 


7,485.53 












1,225.86 


1,565.03 


78.40 
708.34 


121.17 
1,104.21 


5,012.35 


6,067.77 


















4,029.15 




















1,225.86 


1,565.03 


786.74 


1,225.38 


5,012.35 


10,096.92 












40,220.61 


38,798.57 


9,295.08 


8,587.02 


39,545.72 


39,071.96 


210.46 


210.46 


149.8 


132.5 


97.2 


77.5 


84.2 


57.6 


100.0 


100.0 



12 H.C. 



354 



FIFTEENTH ANNUAL REPORT OF THE 



No. 49 



STATEMENT 
Comparative Balance Sheets of Electrical Departments 



EUGENIA 
SYSTEM— Continued 



Municipality 
Population 


Dundalk 

725 


Durham 
1,622 


Elmwood 


* 


1921 


1922 


1921 


1922 


1921 


Assets 

Lands and buildings 


$ c. 


$ c. 


$ c. 


$ c. 


$ c. 


Substation equipment 






584.88 
15,214.52 


584.88 
15,598.72 




Distribution system, overhead.. . . 
Distribution system, underground 


5,997.03 


6,060.56 


4,625.34 


Line transformers 


1,404.81 
953.09 
630.38 


1,404.81 

1,006.19 

648.09 


5,594.45 

3,162.01 

846.90 


5,594.45 

3,357.98 

858.57 


803.88 


Meters 


622.53 


Street light equipment, regular. . . 
Street light equip., ornamental. . . 


297.48 


Misc. construction expense 

Steam or hydraulic plant 


228.69 


228.69 


580.74 


580.74 


1,093.62 


Old plant 


380.94 


380.94 


1,506.51 


1,506.51 








Total plant 


9,594.94 

1,189.64 

1,000.00 

130.00 


9,729.28 

907.91 

1,000.00 

794.36 


27,490.01 
647.49 


28,081.85 


7,442.85 
101.23 


Bank and cash balance 


Securities and investments 






Accounts receivable 


560.98 
108.87 


8,422.19 


35.39 


Inventories 




Sinking fund on local debentures. 








i04.16 


Equity in Hydro systems 

Other assets 


567.51 


1,071.80 


1,106.57 


2,671.60 


















Total assets 


12,482.09 
41.72 


13,503.35 


29,913.92 
2,633.10 


39,175.64 


7,683.63 


Deficit 


1,857.92 










Total 


12,523.81 


13,503.35 


32,547.02 


39,175.64 


9,541.55 






Liabilities 


4,014.01 
3,908.57 


3,816.26 
589.41 


14,768.71 
1,938.72 


21,293.74 

1,072.23 

110.48 




Debenture balance 


6,404.02 


Accounts payable 


1,592.42 


Bank overdraft 










7,672.53 














Total liabilities 


7,922.58 


4,405.67 


24,379.96 


22,476.45 


7,996.44 






Reserves 


1,710.83 
567.51 


1,959.83 
1,071.80 


3,829.29 
1,106.57 


4,173.60 
2,671.60 


644.97 


For equity in H.E.P.C. system. . . 






Total reserves 


2,278.34 


3,031.63 


4,935.86 


6,845.20 


644.97 






Surplus 


2,322.89 


2,520.64 


3,231.29 


4,506.26 


795.98 


Local sinking fund 


104.16 






3,545.41 




5,347.73 












Total surplus 


2,322.89 


6,066.05 


3,231.29 


9,853.99 


900 . 14 






Total liabilities, reserves & surplus 


12,523.81 


13,503.35 


32,547.02 


39,175.64 


9,541.55 


Per cent of net debt to total assets. 


63.2 


35.6 


81.6 


61.6 


104.0 



1923 



HYDRO-ELECTRIC POWER COMMISSION 



355 



" A "— Continued 

of Hydro Municipalities as at December 31, 1922 



Police Vil. 


Flesherton 
410 


Grand Valley 
583 


Hanover 
2,695 


1922 


1921 


1922 


1921 


1922 


1921 


1922 


$. c 


$ c 


$ c 


$ c. 
36.50 


$ c. 
36.50 


$ c. 

64.80 

6,112.60 

42,792.61 


$ c. 
64.80 








9,271.19 


4,661.67 


4,531.29 


4,611.55 


8,738.45 


&,840. 38 


43,748.77 


803.88 
624.18 
302.28 


324.62 
832.80 
384.61 


324.62 
849.90 
384.61 


711.05 

1,370.74 

458.21 


711.05 

1,538.99 

458.21 


13,759.79 

11,484.00 

2,262.82 


13,761.33 

10,983.57 

2,291.18 


1,093.62 


869.12 


869.12 


202.70 


205.70 


6,407.38 


6,168.84 








919.85 


919.85 


2,370.91 


2,370.91 










7,485.63 
215 44 


6,942.44 
391.64 


7,039.80 
1,156.88 


12,437.50 
2,105.75 


12,710.68 
1,766.21 


85,254.91 


88,660.59 
10,843.87 






37.09 


971.38 
25.00 


1,339.25 


37.84 
17.00 


1,423.00 


8,251.23 
1,375.43 


13,988.94 
300.00 


127 68 










355.06 


625.95 




637.62 




5,751.64 






2,758.90 
















7,865.84 
765 98 


8,685.52 
2,667.49 


10,161.88 
969.40 


14,598.09 
991.53 


16,537.51 


94,881.57 
4,666.98 


119,545.04 








8,631.82 


11,353.01 




15,589.62 


16,537.51 


99,548.55 


119,545.04 


6,186.76 
506 17 


6,136.92 
2,943.43 


5,993.36 
2,263.81 


9,314.34 
2,477.97 


8,914.17 


66,795.08 

10,212.16 

6,446.39 


78,012.29 
6,408 . 24 
































6,692.93 


9,080.35 


8,257.17 


11,792.31 


8,914.17 


83,453.63 


84,420.53 


797.97 


1,354.52 
355.06 


1,541.52 
625.95 


2,111.65 


2,397.75 
637.62 


9,390.00 


10,740.25 
5,751.64 






















1,013.24 


563.08 


706.64 


1,685.66 


2,085.83 


6,704.92 


9,487.71 










2,502.14 




9,144.91 














1,140.92 


563.08 


706.64 


1,685.66 


4,587.97 


6,704.92 


18,632.62: 


8,631.82 


11,353.01 


11,131.28 


15,589.62 


16,537.51 


99,548.55 


119,545.04 


85.0 


104.8 


86.8 


80.7 


56.1 


87.9 


74.2 



356 



FIFTEENTH ANNUAL REPORT OF THE 



No. 49 



STATEMENT 
Comparative Balance Sheets of Electrical Departments 



EUGENIA 
SYSTEM— Continued 



Municipality 
Population 


Holstein 


Police Vil. 


Kincardine 
2,159 


Lucknow 

887 




1921 


1922 


1921 


1922 


1921 


Assets 

Lands and buildings 


$ c. 


$ c. 


$ c. 

3,734.20 

3,580.18 

32,809.77 


$ c. 

4,445 . 65 

2,869.48 

33,704.25 


$ c. 


Substation equipment 








Distribution system, overhead.. . . 
Distribution system, underground 
Line transformers 


1,939.55 


1,969.80 


13,692.64 


455.22 
255.84 
168.69 


455.22 
341.07 
168.65 


3,633.21 
4,318.76 
3,796.16 


5,254.13 
5,234.82 
3,796.16 


1,920.16 

1,183.34 

972.06 


Meters 


Street light equipment, regular. ... 
Street light equip., ornamental. . 


Misc. construction expense 

Steam or hydraulic plant 


170.25 


170.25 


4,566.24 


5,316.31 


1,951.98 


Old plant 
























Total plant 


2,989.55 
61.53 


3,105.03 
155.63 


56,438.52 
416.77 


60,620.84 
247.61 


19,720.18 
163.21 


Bank and cash balance 


Securities and investments 




Accounts receivable 


'275.57 
15.00 


280.14 


558.52 
2,240.36 
3,342.36 


791.39 

954.49 

3,482.36 




Inventories 


25.00 


Sinking fund on local debentures 






Equity in Hydro systems 




219.96 




Other assets 






















Total assets 


3,341.65 
4,921.02 


3,760.76 
4,064.54 


62,996.53 
6,817.80 


66,096.69 
10,491.23 


19,908.39 


Deficit 


548.02 






Total 


8,262.67 


7,825.30 


69,814.33 


76,587.92 


20,456.41 






Liabilities 

Debenture balance 


2,169.42 
5,083.93 


2,050.7c 
4,424.88 


43,112.62 
22,271.97 


61,960.0C 
7,859.56 


10,450.99 


Accounts payable 


9,743.25 


Bank overdraft 




Other liabilities 
























Total liabilities 


7,253.35 


6,475.67 


65,384.59 


69,819.56 


20,194.24 






Reserves 
For depreciation 


416.69 


418.41 
219.96 




1,046.00 


















Total reserves 


416.69 


638.37 




1,046.00 










Surplus 

Debentures paid 


592.63 


711.26 


1,087.38 
3,342.36 


2,240.0C 
3,482.36 


262.17 


Local sinking fund 




Additional operating surplus 




















Total surplus 


592.63 


711.26 


4,429 . 74 


5,722.36 


262.17 






Total liabilities, reserves & surplus 


8,262.67 


7,825.30 


69,814.33 


76,587.92 


20,456.41 


Per cent of net debt to total assets. 


217.5 


182.8 


103.7 


111.5 


101.5 






1923 



HYDRO-ELECTRIC POWER COMMISSION 



357 



" A "— Continued 

of Hydro Municipalities as at December 31, 1922 



Lucknow 


Markdale 
908 


Mount Forest 
1,761 


Neustadt 
445 


1922 


1921 


1922 


1921 


1922 


1921 


1922 


$ c. 


$ c. 


$ c. 


$ c. 

3,725.00 

686.75 

16,446.19 


$ c. 

3,725.00 

686.75 

17,054.27 


$ c. 


$ c. 




780.80 
7,136.28 


780.80 
7,279.83 






13,837.96 


9,465.54 


9,530.16 


2,050.70 

2,085.54 

972.06 


2,108.87 

1,866.33 

530.79 


2,108.87 

1,961.20 

530.79 


3,375.54 
3,735.19 
1,655.77 


3,375.54 
3,903.44 
1,680.22 


3,490.29 

1,308.92 

496.41 

1,495.88 


4,396.03 

1,511.52 

496.41 

1,495.88 


2,079.48 


587.06 


587.06 


1,796.02 


1,796.02 












2,080.65 


2,080.65 


3,958.97 


3,958.97 


1,097.60 


1,097.60 






21,025.74 
410.60 


15,090.78 

731.58 


15,329.20 
941 . 70 


35,379.43 

385.91 

3,887.83 

170.63 

964.55 


36,180.21 

410.57 

3,887.83 

1,351.75 

122.45 


17,354.64 
479.81 


18,527.60 
496.14 


7.80 


378.80 
2,093.76 


2,257.95 
700.00 


479.81 

483.79 


6,342.58 








105.07 


451.71 


1,653.59 


3,137.30 


























21,444.14 


18,399.99 


19,680.56 


42,441.94 
13,292.76 


45,090.11 

578.75 


18,798.05 
7,704.21 


25,366.32 
3,928.61 










21,444.14 


18,399.99 


19,680.56 


55,734.70 


45,668.86 


26,502.26 


29,294.93 


18,939.94 
166.07 


8,206.23 
3,985.01 


8,044.76 
2,561.85 


23,145.38 
17,615.48 


22,322.84 
5,536.50 


15,788.18 
8,017.26 


15,230.19 
10,438.93 






























19,106.01 


12,191.24 


10,606.61 


40,760.86 


27,859.34 


23,805.44 


25,669.12 


366.00 


2,331.20 
105.07 


2,703.05 
451.71 


5,507.03 
1,653.59 


6,036.46 
3,137.30 


1,485.00 


1,856.00 








366.00 


2,436.27 


3,154.76 


7,160.62 


9,173.76 


1,485.00 


1,856.00 


783.42 


793.77 


955.24 


7,813.22 


8,635 . 76 


1,211.82 


1,769.81 


1,188.71 


2,978.71 


4,963.95 




















1,972.13 


3,772.48 


5,919.19 


7,813.22 


8,635.76 


1,211.82 


1,769.81 


21,444.14 


18,399.99 


19,680.56 


55,734.70 


45,668.86 


26,502.26 


29,294.93 


89.0 


66.3 


54.8 


96.00 


66.5 


126.7 


101.1 



358 



FIFTEENTH ANNUAL REPORT OF THE 



No. 49 



STATEMENT 
Comparative Balance Sheets of Electrical Departments 



EUGENIA 
SYSTEM— Continued 


Municipality 
Population 


Orangeville 
2,503 


Owen Sound 
12,360 


Priceville 




1921 


1922 


1921 


1922 


1921 


Assets 

Lands and buildings 


$ c. 

2,517.00 

1,169.00 

21,407.50 


$ c 

2,517.00 

1,169.00 

21,741.82 


$ c. 

28,953.74 

8,464.45 

65,948.46 


$ c. 

28,953 . 74 

8,464.45 

68,965.81 


$ c. 
68.00 


Substation equipment 


Distribution system, overhead.. . . 
Distribution system, underground 


4,621.29 


Line transformers 


2,760.57 
4,179.29 
1,139.49 


3,057.82 
4,792.07 
1,149.67 


24,234.90 
33,214.26 
10,179.09 
500.00 
2,003.96 
32,282.00 


25,921.18 
35,422.88 
10,259.21 
500.00 
2,003.96 
33,282.00 


499 . 70 
247.16 
139.88 


Meters 


Street light equipment, regular. . . 
Street light equip., ornamental. . . 


Misc. construction expense 

Steam or hydraulic plant 


3,331.69 


3,331.69 


833.90 


Old plant 


3,204.99 


3,204.99 












Total plant 


39,709.53 

1,232.37 


40,964.06 
1,076.10 


206,780.86 


213,773.23 

4,752.47 


6,409.93 

98.63 


Bank and cash balance. . 


Securities and investments 




Accounts receivable 


34.93 
568.16 


128.58 
370.00 


5,512.87 

16,526.65 

102,633.22 

7,771.53 

217.40 


10,644.98 

16,697.41 

110,605.47 

15,280.62 

132.05 


114.43 


Inventories 


Sinking fund on local debentures. 





Equity in Hydro systems 




1,474.48 




Other assets i 














Total assets 


41,544.99 
10,095.32 


44,013.22 
6,265.45 


339,442.53 


371,886.23 


6,622.99 
229.74 


Deficit 








Total 


51,640.31 


50,278.67 


339,442.53 


371,886.23 


6,852.73 




Liabilities 

Debenture balance 


28,535.37 
11,445.81 


27,028.56 
7,876.39 


141,000.00 

20,069.53 

5,120.56 


141,000.00 
21,537.39 


5,836.90 
852.73 


Accounts payable 


Bank overdraft. . 


Other liabilities 






















Total liabilities 


39,981.18 


34,904.95 


166,190.09 


162,537.39 


6,689.63 




Reserves 

For depreciation. . 


6,144.50 


6,877.80 
1,474.48 


32,444.07 
7,771.53 


32,407.23 
15,280.62 




For equity in H.E.P.C. system. . 











Total reserves 


6,144.50 


8,352.28 


40,215.60 


47,687.85 








Surplus 

Debentures paid. . 


5,514.63 


7,021.44 






163.10 


Local sinking fund 


102,633.22 
30,403.62 


110,605.47 
51,055.52 


Additional operating surplus . . 
















Total surplus 


5,514.63 


7,021.44 


133,036.84 


161,660.99 


163.10 




Total liabilities, reserves & surplus 


51,640.31 


50,278.67 


339,442.50 


371,886.23 


6,852 . 73 


Per cent of net debt to total assets. 


96.4 


82.0 


48.9 


45.6 


101.2 



1923 



HYDRO-ELECTRIC POWER COMMISSION 



359 



"A"— Continued 

of Hydro Municipalities as at December 31, 1922 



Police Vil. 


Ripley Police Village 


Shelburne 
1,101 


Tar a 
521 


1922 


1921 


1922 


1921 


1922 


1921 


1922 


$ c. 
68.00 


$ c. 


$ c. 


$ c. 

800.00 

566.60 

12,825.50 


$ c. 

800.00 

566.60 

12,939.97 


$ c. 


$ c. 












4,621.29 


8,389.06 


8,571.66 


10,194.26 


10,221.81 


549 . 70 
247.16 
139.88 


2,592.36 
438.91 
834.03 


2,592.36 
476.70 
834.03 


3,137.39 

3,145.84 

971.65 


3,251.98 

3,298.96 

971.65 


1,706.89 

1,165.78 

463.30 


1,706.89 

1,221.88 

430.59 


833.90 


1,164.99 


1,164.99 


2,189.46 


2,189.46 


1,871.56 


1,871.56 








739:50 


739.50 
















6,459.93 
196.39 


13,419.35 
2,109.32 


13,639.74 
466.05 


24,375.94 
881.46 


24,758.12 
1,239.51 


15,401.79 
929.26 


15,452.73 
652.84 


262.36 




26.96 


617.74 


484.57 




1,053.21 






15.00 


3.84 






















1,198.33 
































6,918.68 
620.72 


15,528.67 

257.72 


14,132.75 
335.68 


25,875.14 
3,831.89 


27,680.53 


16,346.05 
8,567.14 


17,162.62 
6,281.51 








7,539.40 


15,786.39 


14,468.43 


29,706.03 


27,680.53 


24,913.19 


23,444.13 


6,588.15 
428.40 


13,770.82 
1,814.45 


13,557.63 
286.49 


16,556.18 
6,246.03 


15,783.1.1 
2,136.49 


14,070.08 
7,802.19 


13,546.90 
5,998.13 






























7,016.55 


15,585.27 


13,844.12 


22,802.21 


17,919.60 


21,872.27 


19,545.03 


111.00 




210.00 


3,541.00 


3,952.05 
1,198.33 


1,611.00 


1,946.00 




















110.00 




210.00 


3,541.00 


5,150.38 


1,611.00 


1,946 00 








411.85 


201.12 


414.31 


3,363.82 


4,136.89 


1,429.92 


1,953.10 










473.66 


















411.85 


201.12 


414.31 


3,363.82 


4,610.55 


1,429.92 


1,953.10 


7,539.40 


15,786.39 


14,468.43 


29,707.03 


27,680.53 


24,913.19 


23,444.13 


101.4 


100.0 


97.9 


88.0 


67.7 


134.2 


133.8 



360 



FIFTEENTH ANNUAL REPORT OF THE 



No. 49 



STATEMENT 
Comparative Balance Sheets of Electrical Departments 



EUGENIA 
SYSTEM— Continued 










Municipality 
Population 


Teeswater 
838 


Wingham 
2,470 




1921 


1922 


1921 


1922 


Assets 

Lands and buildings 


$ c. 


$ c. 


$ c 

9,000.00 

4,657.93 

28,393.31 


$ c. 

8,603.45 

4,657.93 

28,973.78 


Substation equipment 

Distribution system, overhead.. . . 
Distribution system, underground 
Line transformers 


330.31 
13,719.15 


330.31 
13,929.37 


2,394.57 
1,538.04 
1,297.97 


2,771.05 
1,694.67 
1,297.97 


10,498.45 
6,944.58 
2,948.07 


11,117.92 

7,323.05 
2,948.07 


Meters 

Street light equipment, regular. . . 
Street light equip., ornamental . 


Misc. construction expense 

Steam or hydraulic plant 


1,893.39 


1,727.00 


3,540.89 
13,200.00 
15,392.64 


3,540.89 
13,200.00 
15,288.58 


Old plant 


5,361.36 


5,000.36 


Total plant 

Bank and cash balance 


26,534.79 
1,779.44 


26,750.73 
743.97 


94,575.87 
5,244.81 


95,653.67 

4,287.57 


Securities and investments 




Accounts receivable 


236.49 


278.10 


2,331.35 
177.93 


1,504.74 


Inventories 


1,143.88 


Sinking fund on local debentures. 
Equity in Hydro systems . 


1,560.01 


2,122.16 






Other assets 








25.35 












Total assets 

Deficit 


30,110.73 
2,524.62 


29,894.96 
1,235.83 


102,329.96 

2,728.48 


102,615.21 






Total 


32,635.35 


31,130.79 


105,058.44 


102,615.21 






Liabilities 

Debenture balance 

Accounts payable 

Bank overdraft 


27,433.36 
3,075.34 


27,433.36 
610.63 


74,727.57 
6,292.94 


72,039.24 
1,266.77 


Other liabilities 




















Total liabilities 


30,508.70 


28,043.99 


81,020.51 


73,306.01 






For depreciation 




398.00 


2,660.00 


4,272.00 


For equity in H.E.P.C. system 
















Total reserves 




398.00 


2,660.00 


4,272.00 








Surplus 

Debentures paid 

Local sinking fund 


566.64 
1,560.01 


566.64 
2,122.16 


21,377.93 


24,066.26 


Additional operating surplus . . 




970.94 












Total surplus 


2,126.65 


2,688.80 


21,377.93 


25,037.20 


Total liabilities, reserves & surplus 


32,635.35 


31,130.79 


105,058.44 


102,615.21 


Per cent of net debt to total assets. 


101.3 


93.4 


79.3 


71.4 



1923 



HYDRO-ELECTRIC POWER COMMISSION 



361 



" A "—Continued 

of Hydro Municipalities as at December 31, 1922 





WASDELLS 
SYSTEM 


EUGENIA 

SYSTEM 

SUMMARY 


Beavcrton 
986 


Brechin Police Vil. 


Brock Township 


1921 


1922 


1921 


1922 


1921 


1922 


1921 


1922 


$ c. 

48,964.24 

27,529.48 

364,691.33 


$ c 

49,279.14 

29,977.37 

373,262.99 


$ c. 
250.00 


$ c. 
250.00 


$ c. 


% c. 


% c. 


$ c. 










8,332.74 


8,714.60 


1,496.59 


1,512.45 










93,878.28 

88,490.95 

32,045.51 

1,995 88 


99,917.70 
94,924.02 
32,452.15 
1,995.88 
39,495.34 
46,482.00 
43,153.93 


2,221.28 

2,679.42 

501.09 


2,413.39 

3,010.33 

501.09 


936.80 

371.77 

69 . 89 


936. 8C 

412.57 

69. 8c 


1,742.56 
795.70 


1,742.56 
795.70 








39,019.70 
46,482.00 
43,618.99 


2,085.67 


2,163.77 


266.26 


337.06 


61.74 


61.74 


3,772.42 


3,772.42 




















786,716.36 

19,699.59 

4,887.83 


810,940.52 

32,398.26 

4,887.83 

52,193.17 

20,447.07 

117,441.88 

36,380.59 

157.40 


19,842.62 
2,602.61 


20,825.60 
1,385.04 


3,141.31 
446 . 80 


3,268.77 
747.13 


2,600.00 


2,600.00 






21,342.56 

24,936.50 

108,348.09 

11,767.29 

217 40 


559.30 
807.42 


2,277.29 
402.95 


152.38 
96.50 


247.65 
















1,543.65 


1,920.6. 7 


902 M 


1,294.41 
























977,915.62 
97,666.14 


1,074,846.72 
49,891.03 


25,355.60 


26,811.51 


4,739.63 
3,838.64 


5,557.96 
2,954.0/ 


2,600.00 


2,500.00 












1,075,581.76 


1,124,737.75 


25,355.60 


26,811.51 


8,578.32 


8,512.03 


2,600.00 


2,600.00 


579,819.57 
171,458.91 


615,888.08 

94,340.34 

110.48 


13,162.73 
4,751.99 


12,840.35 


1,571.19 
5,282.63 


2,787.08 
3,491.56 


• 2,446.75 


2,363.75 


11,919 66 






7,672.53 






























770,870.67 


710,338.90 


17,914.72 


12,840.35 


6,853.82 


6,273.64 


2,446.75 


2,363.75 


85,214.80 


95,613.99 
36,380.59 


2,649.00 
1,543.65 


3,037.00 
1,920.63 


643.00 
902.69 


725.00 
1,294.41 






11,767.29 












96,982.09 


131,994.58 


4,192.65 


4,957.63 


1,545.69 


2,019.41 












65,998.58 
108,348.09 


81,740.27 

117,441.88 

83,222.12 


1,837.27 


2,159.65 


178.81 


213.98 


153.25 


236.25 


33,382.33 


. 1,410.96 


6,853.88 




















207,729.00 


282,404.27 


3,243.23 


9,013.53 


178.81 


213.98 


153.25 


236.25 


1,075,581.76 


1,124,737.75 


25,355.60 


26,811.51 


8,578.32 


8,512.03 


2,600.00 


2,600.00 


78.8 


68.5 


70.8 


51.6 


144.6 


147.5 


94.2 


90.1 



362 



FIFTEENTH ANNUAL REPORT OF THE 



No. 49 



STATEMENT 
Comparative Balance Sheets of Electrical Departments 



WASDELLS 
SYSTEM— Continued 



Municipality 
Population 


Cannington 
951 


Kirkfield Police Vil. 


Port Perry 
1,162 




1921 


1922 


1921 


1922 


1922 


Assets 

Lands and buildings 


$ c. 


$ c. 


$ c. 


$ c. 


$ c. 


Substation equipment 












Distribution system, overhead.. . . 
Distribution system, underground 


7,321.97 


7,601.24 


5,041.33 


5,041.33 


14,102.66 


Line transformers 


1,770.29 

2,728.71 

563.03 


1,902.40 

2,899.05 

563.03 


428.20 
390.60 
368.29 


428.20 
390.60 
368.29 


1,351.03 


Meters 


1,759.23 


Street light equipment, regular. . . 
Street light equip., ornamental . 


410.31 


Misc. construction expense 

Steam or hydraulic plant. . 


506.58 


559.63 


301.53 


301.53 


592.18 


Old plant 


3,609.37 


3,609.37 
















Total plant 


16,499.95 

756.77 


17,134.72 
443.34 


6,529.95 
303.87 


6,529.95 
9.49 


18,215.41 


Bank and cash balance 


530.80 


Securities and investments 




Accounts receivable 


457.26 
1,300.90 


465.59 
1,820.83 




22.90 
523.10 


225.25 


Inventories 






Sinking fund on local debentures. 






Equity in Hydro systems 

Other assets 


1,120.46 


1,672.85 


























Total assets 


20,135.34 
2,874.60 


21,537.33 


6,833.82 
244.17 


7,085.44 
19.46 


18,971.46 


Deficit 


83.58 








Total 


23,009.94 


21,537.33 


7,077.99 


7,104.90 


19,055.04 






Liabilities 

Debenture balance. . 


13,444.74 
3,985.48 


13,129.87 
358.81 


5,826.90 
828.99 


5,664.01 
730.90 




Accounts payable 


19,055.04 


Bank overdraft. . 




Other liabilities 
























Total liabilities 


17,430.22 


13,488.68 


6,655.89 


6,394.91 


19,055.04 


Reserves 

For depreciation. . 


2,904.00 
1,120.46 


3,133.20 
1,672.85 


249.00 


374.00 




For equity in H.E.P.C. system. . . 












4,024.46 


4,806.05 


249.00 


374.00 








Surplus 

Debentures paid. . 


1,555.26 


1,870.13 


173.10 


335.99 




Local sinking fund. . 








1,372.47 


















Total surplus. . . , 


1,555.26 


3,242.60 


173.10 


335.99 








Total liabilities, reserves & surplus 


23,009.94 


21,537.33 


7,077.99 


7,104.90 


19,055.04 


Per cent of net debt to total assets. 


86.6 


68.0 


97.3 


90.2 


100.4 



923 



HYDRO-ELECTRIC POWER COMMISSION 



363 



" A "— Continued 

of Hydro Municipalities as at December 31, 1922 



Sunderland Police Vil. 


Uxbridge 
1,492 


Woodville 
455 


WASDELLS 

SYSTEM 
SUMMARY 


1921 


1922 


1922 


1921 


1922 


1921 


1922 


$ c. 


$ c. 


$ c. 


$ c. 


$ c. 


$ c. 
250.00 


$ c. 
250.00 














3,205.34 


3,222.65 


9,596.49 


2,065.16 


2,042.35 


27,463.13 


51,833.77 


1,250.16 

1,101.50 

240.33 


1,250.16 

1,245.90 

240.33 


1,321.28 
1,377.38 
1,187.43 


804.32 

1,319.21 

127.31 


898.87 

1,367.17 

127.31 


7,411.05 
8,591.21 
1,869.94 


12,244.69 

13,257.93 

3,467.68 


142.22 


142.22 


694.42 


251.91 


251.91 


3,554.17 


5,104.46 


2,030.00 


2,030.00 




2,182.50 


2,182.50 


11,594.29 


11,594.29 








7,969.55 
62.77 


8,131.26 
519.41 


14,177.00 
777.00 


6,750.41 


6,870.11 

722.26 


60,733.79 

4,172.82 


97,752.82 
5,134.47 








116.90 

88.78 


114.99 


246.01 


195.93 


575.81 


1,481.77 
2,293.60 


4,175.49 

2,746.88 














1,043.22 


1,561.91 




1,093.90 


1,588.70 


5,703.92 


8,038.50 






















9,281.22 
4,965.84 


10,327.57 
2,350.78 


15,200.01 


8,040.24 
3,271.76 


9,756.88 
94.25 


74,385.90 
15,195.01 


117,848.16 
5,502.14 








14,247.06 


12,678.35 


15,200.01 


11,312.00 


9,851.13 


89,580.91 


123,350.30 


5,884.75 


5,709.67 
2,966.32 




4,912.59 

3,829.05 

68.15 


4,783.59 
1,821.53 


44,802.90 

23,895.86 

68.15 


47,278.32 


5,217.72 


14,820.10 


43,244.26 






338.05 


















11,102.47 


8,675.99 


15,158.15 


8,809.79 


6,605.12 


68,766.91 


90,860.63 


1,186.12 


1,350.12 
1,561.91 




820.90 
1,093.90 


940.90 
1,588.70 


8,452.02 
5,703.92 


9,560.22 


1,043.22 




8,038.50 




























915.25 


1,090.33 




587.41 


716.41 


5,247.10 


6,622.74 












41.86 






1,410.96 


8,268.21 












915.25 


1,090.33 


41.86 


587.41 


716.41 


6,658.06 


14,890.95 


14,247.06 


12,678.35 


15,200.01 


11,312.00 


9,851.13 


89,580.91 


123,350.30 


119.6 


99.0 


99.7 


109.5 


80.8 


92.5 


82.7 



364 



FIFTEENTH ANNUAL REPORT OF THE 



No. 49 



STATEMENT 
Comparative Balance Sheets of Electrical Departments 



MUSKOKA 
SYSTEM 



Municipality 
Population 


Gravenhurst 
1,621 


Huntsville 
2,316 




1921 


1922 


1921 


1922 


Assets 

Lands and buildings 


$ c. 
12,258.29 
12,209.74 
26,851.15 


$ c. 
12,258.29 
12,209.74 
27,630.86 


$ c. 

326.49 

647.30 

10,665.91 


$ c. 
326.49 


Substation equipment 


647.30 


Distribution system, overhead.. . . 
Distribution system, underground 
Line transformers 


10,960.78 


1,518.59 

4,719.18 

695.45 


1,703.32 

4,913.73 

695.45 


2,955.20 
5,079.26 
1,036.50 


2,955.20 


Meters 


5,403.88 


Street light equipment, regular. . . 
Street light equip., ornamental. . 


1,036.50 


Misc. construction expense 

Steam or hydraulic plant 


1,542.00 


1,872.00 


279.92 


279.92 


Old plant 


7,610.69 


7,610.69 


5,436.20 


5,436.20 






Total plant 


67,405.09 
3,527.63 


68,894.08 
4,699.94 


26,426.78 
6,154.76 


27,046.27 


Bank and cash balance 


2,677.01 


Securities and investments 




Accounts receivable 


2,098.26 

2,568.27 

2,770.49 

750.60 


3,537.51 
2,770.07 
3,125.74 
1,449.06 


2,386.55 
2,448.62 


12,592.33 


Inventories 


3,167.32 


Sinking fund on local debentures. 

Equity in Hydro systems 

Other assets. . . . 






3,069 84 
















Total assets 


79,120.34 
7,010.75 


84,476.40 
1,441.40 


37,416.71 


48,552.77 


Deficit 










Total 


86,131.09 


85,917.80 


37,416.71 


48,552.77 






Liabilities 

Debenture balance 


38,122.60 
6,689.56 


36,233.52 
5,463.46 


16,781.42 
8,978.66 


15,760.92 


Accounts payable 


6,252.74 


Bank overdraft. . 




Other liabilities 




















Total liabilities 


44,812.16 


41,696.98 


25,760.08 


22,013.66 






Reserves 

For depreciation 


11,952.00 
750 . 60 


11,911.10 
1,449.06 


4,424.00 


4,767.49 


For equity in H.E.P.C. system. . . 


3,069.84 






Total reserves 


12,702.60 


13,360.16 


4,424.00 


7,837.33 






Surplus 

Debentures paid 


25,845.84 
2,770.49 


27,734.92 


4,352.12 


5,372.62 






Additional operating surplus 


2,880.51 


13,329.16 










Total surplus 


28,616.33 


30,860.66 


7,232.63 


18,701.78 






Total liabilities, reserves & surplus 


86,131.09 


85,917.80 


37,416.71 


48,552.77 


Per cent of net debt to total assets. 


56.7 


50.3 


68.8 


48.4 



1923 



HYDRO-ELECTRIC POWER COMMISSION 



365 



" A "—Continued 

of Hydro Municipalities as at December 31, 1922 





ST. LAWRENCE 
SYSTEM 






MUSKOKA 

SYSTEM 
SUMMARY 


Alexandria 
2,319 


Apple Hill Police Vil. 


Brockville 
9,377 


1921 


1922 


1921 


1922 


1921 


1922 


1921 


1922 


$ c. 
12,584.7.8 
12,857.04 
37,517.06 


$ c. 
12,584.78 
12,857.04 
38,591.64 


$ c. 
202.00 


$ c. 
202.00 


$ c. 
169.06 


$ c. 
169.06 


$ c. 
27,994.53 


$ c 
27,994.53 


19,351.72 


19,565.25 


2,703.68 


2,703.68 


60,140.61 


60,724.78 


4,473.79 
9,798.44 
1,731.95 


4,658.52 

10,317.61 

1,731.95 


5,459.76 
4,139.67 
1,988.99 


6,202.23 
4,523.87 
1,988.99 


1,165.70 
476.49 
398.97 


1,165.70 
615.81 
398.97 


19,659.27 
24,311.12 
14,655.61 


20,916.53 
25,955.08 
14,792.33 


1,821.92 


2,151.92 


5,318.02 


5,367,72 


133.73 


133.73 


5,686.59 


5,561.59 


13,046.89 


13,046.89 


4,734.89 


4,531.89 


709.55 


709.55 


53,445.98 


53,445.98 


93,831.87 
9,682.39 


95,940.35 
7,376.95 


41,195.05 
2,614.67 


42,381.95 
1,754.77 


5,757.18 
43.45 


5,896.50 
291.26 


205,893.71 
200.00 


209,390.82 
200.00 


4,484.81 
5,016.89 
2,770.49 


16,129.84 
5,937.39 
3,125.74 
4,518.90 


579.38 
1,290.70 


972.82 
1,122.11 


300.41 


398.97 


25,562.67 
2,774.62 

50,349.30 
4,970.18 


49,855.05 
704 71 






57,324.67 


750.60 










10,221.57 












516.28 


















116,537.05 
7,010.75 


133,029.17 
1,441.40 


45,679.80 
2,123.86 


46,231.65 
3,474.45 


6,101.04 

52.51 


6,586.73 
376.01 


289,750.48 
39,637.41 


328,213.10 
18,480.82 


123,547.80 


134,470.57 


47,803.66 


49,706.10 


6,153.55 


6,962.74 


329,387.89 


346,693.92 


54,904.02 
15,668.22 


51,994.44 
11,716.20 


41,816.37 
4,063.57 


39,785.00 
5,333.01 


5,000.00 
1,153.55 


4,864.08 
1,867.74 


130,893.85 
16,726.53 
53,794.88 


125,827.82 
14,436.86 
58,274.82 
































70,572.24 


63,710.64 


45,879.94 


45,118.01 


6,153.55 


6,731.82 


201,415.26 


198,539.50 


16,376.00 


16,678.59 
4,518.90 




633.00 




95.00 


9,547.00 
4,970.18 


12,436.00 


750.60 






10,221.57 














17,126.60 


21,197.49 




633.00 




95.00 


14,517.18 


22,657.57 










30,197.96 


33,107.54 

3,125.74 

13,329.16 


1,923.72 


3,955.09 




135.92 


63,106.15 
50,349.30 


68,172.18 


2,770.49 




57,324.67 


2,880.51 
























35,848.96 


49,562.44 


1,923.72 


3,955.09 




135.92 


113,455.45 


125,496.85 








123,547.80 


134,470.57 


47,803.66 


49,706.10 


6,153.55 


6,962.74 


329,387.89 


346,693.92 


60.6 


49.8 


100.6 


97.5 


100.8 


102.2 


69.5 


62.4 



366 



FIFTEENTH ANNUAL REPORT OF THE 



No. 49 



STATEMENT 
Comparative Balance Sheets of Electrical Departments 



ST. LAWRENCE 
SYSTEM— Continued 



Municipality 
Population 


Chesterville 
941 


Lancaster 
612 


Martin- 
town P.V. 




1921 


1922 


1921 


1922 


1921 


Assets 

Lands and buildings. . . . 


$ c. 
250.00 


$ c. 
250.00 


$ c. 


$ c. 


$ c. 
126 15 


Substation equipment. . . . 








Distribution system, overhead.. . . 
Distribution system, underground 

Line transformers 

Meters 


6,164.82 


6,187.91 


5,963.47 


5,967.15 


2,400.72 


1,930.73 

2,273.19 

318.22 


1,930.73 

2,521.84 

318.22 


1,064.35 
844.05 
567.75 


1,064.35 
978.95 
567.75 


766.16 
475.07 


Street light equipment, regular. . . 
Street light equip., ornamental 


335.26 


Misc. construction expense 

Steam or hydraulic plant . 


610.68 


610.68 


1,053.60 


1,053.60 


653.27 


Old plant. 
























Total plant 


11,547.64 


11,819.38 
318.23 


9,493.22 
415.60 


9,631.80 
371.45 


4,756.63 
1,190.12 


Bank and cash balance 


Securities and investments 




Accounts receivable 


950.67 
2,290.52 


2,851.68 
3;419.30 




560.00 


264.25 


Inventories . 




Sinking fund on local debentures. 

Equity in Hydro systems 

Other assets. . 








2,505.64 


3,703.51 


























Total assets 


17,294.47 
3,678.52 


22,112.10 


9,908.82 
1,526.23 


10,563.25 
3,316.86 


6,211.00 


Deficit 


84.91 








Total 


20,972.99 


22,112.10 


11,435.05 


13,880.11 


6,295.91 






Liabilities 


5,331.55 

8,237.66 

825.69 


5,081.94 
6,372.26 


9,617.02 
1,464.63 


9,242.42 
3,738.69 




Debenture balance 


5,836.90 


Accounts payable 


295.91 


Bank overdraft. . 




Other liabilities 






















Total liabilities 


14,394.90 


11,454.20 


11,081.65 


12,981.11 


6,132.81 






For depreciation. 


2,904.00 
2,505.64 


3,189.85 
3,703.51 




171.00 




For equity in H.E.P.C. system. . . 














5,409 . 64 


6,893.36 




171.00 










Surplus 

Debentures paid 


1,168.45 


1,418.06 


353.40 


728.00 


163.10 


Local sinking fund 








2,346.48 


















Total surplus 


1,168.45 


3,764.54 


353.40 


728.00 


163.10 






Total liabilities, reserves & surplus 


20,972.99 


22,112.10 


11,435.05 


13,880.11 


6,295.91 


Per cent of net debt to total assets. 


83.3 


62.3 


112.2 


122.8 


98.8 



1923 



HYDRO-ELECTRIC POWER COMMISSION 



367 



" A "—Continued 

of Hydro Municipalities as at December 31, 1922 



Martin- 
town P.V. 


Maxville 

785 


Prescott 
2,723 


Williamsbu 


rg Police Vil. 


1922 


1921 


1922 


1921 


1922 


1921 


1922 


$ c. 
126 15 


$ c. 


$ c. 


$ c. 
2,761.54 


$ c. 
2,761.54 


$ c. 


$ c. 




407 . 79 
10,142.31 


407 . 79 
10,305.19 






2,400.72 


27,160.31 


27,796.85 


1,597.74 


1,597.74 


690.33 
475.07 
335.26 


1,732.20 
1,388.10 
1,270.70 


1,732.20 
1,681.42 
1,284.30 


6,938.98 
9,325.39 
1,490.28 


7,080.48 
9,550.80 
1,546.12 


297.89 

650.47 

74.41 


297.89 

650.47 

74.41 


653.27 


2,347.27 


2,357.66 


1,340.70 


1,352.20 


4. CO 


4.00 








12,108.35 


12,108.35 
















4,680.80 
192.92 


17,288.37 


17,768.56 


61,125.55 
3,389.41 


62,196.34 

3,725.17 


2,624.51 
1,234.76 


2,624.51 
1,182.39 


1,000.00 
165.97 








51.59 


135.25 


6,758.51 


12,978.67 


27.06 


67.28 








2,128.31 

1,916.21 

.15 


2,583.37 
2,845.56 












81.49 


186.18 






















6,039.69 
38 31 


17,339.96 
1,918.96 


17,903.81 
2,352.71 


75,318.14 


84,329.11 


3,967.82 
448.53 


4,060.36 










6,078.00 


19,258.92 


20,256.52 


75,318.14 


84,329.11 


4,416.35 


4,060.36 


5,664.01 


15,541.13 
2,143.61 
1,115.31 


15,057.02 
2,572.39 
1,382.13 


17,996.88 
3,581.68 


17,128.63 
2,836.37 


2;072.79 
939.86 


1,955.75 






























5,664.01 


18,800.05 


19,011.54 


21,578.56 


19,965.00 


3,012.65 


1,955.75 


78 00 




302.00 


15,492.00 
1,916.21 


17,081.00 
2,845.56 


645.00 
81.49 


723 00 






186.18 






















909.18 








335.99 


458.87 


942.98 


5,982.46 
28,220.60 


6,850.71 
35,003.47 


677.21 


794.25 










401.18 












335.99 


458.87 


942.98 


36,331.37 


44,437.55 


677.21 


1,195.43 


6,078.00 


19,258.92 


20,256.52 


75,318.14 


84,329.11 


4,416.35 


4,060.36 


93.7 


108.7 


106.1 


28.6 


24.6 


76.0 


50.5 



368 



FIFTEENTH ANNUAL REPORT OF THE 



No. 49 



STATEMENT 
Comparative Balance Sheets of Electrical Departments 



ST. LAWRENCE 
SYSTEM— Continued 



Municipality 
Population 


Winchester 
1,058 


ST. LAWRENCE 

SYSTEM 

SUMMARY 


. 


1921 


1922 


1921 


1922 


Assets 

Lands and buildings 


$ c. 
224.15 


$ c. 
224.15 


$ c. 

31,727.43 

407 . 79 

143,103.97 


$ c. 
31,727.43 


Substation equipment 


407 . 79 


Distribution system, overhead.. . . 
Distribution system, underground 
Line transformers 


7,478.59 


7,552.72 


144,801.99 


989.01 

2,400.74 

564.98 


989.01 

2,616.27 

564. 9£ 


40,004.05 
46,284.29 
21,665.17 


42,069.45 


Meters 


49,569.58 

21,871.33 


Street light equipment, regular. . . 
Street light equip., ornamental. . . 


Misc. construction expense 

Steam or hydraulic plant 


343 . 94 


343.94 


17,491.80 


17,438.39 


Old plant 


1,100.00 


1,100.00 


72,098.77 


71,895.77 




Total plant 


13,101.41 


13,391.07 
1,544. IS 


372,783.27 
9,088.81 


379,781.73 
9,580.37 


Bank and cash balance 


Securities and investments 




1,000.00 


Accounts receivable 


2,229.74 
3,338.46 


6,773.15 

3,704.23 


36,724.28 

9,694.30 

52,477.61 

10,641.28 

.15 


74,758.88 


Inventories 


8,950.35 


Sinking fund on local debentures . 


59,908.04 


Equity in Hydro systems 

Other assets 


1,167.76 


1,747.92 


18,704.74 
516.28 










Total assets 


19,837.37 


27,160.55 


491,408.90 
49,470.93 


553,200.39 


Deficit 


28,039.16 










Total 


19,837.37 


27,160.55 


540,879.8: 


581,239.55 






Liabilities 










Debenture balance 


9,520.24 

1,405.67 

804.18 


9,318.54 
3,568.00 


243,626.73 
40,012.67 
56,540.06 


233,925.21 


Accounts payable 


40,725.32 


Bank overdraft ' 


59,656.95 


Other liabilities 
















Total liabilities 


11,730.09 


12,886.54 


340,179.46 


334,307.48 






Reserves 

For depreciation 


3,579.33 
1,167.76 


3,561.82 
1,747.92 


32,167.33 
10,641.28 


38,270.67 


For equity in H.E.P.C. system. . . 


18,704.74 


Total reserves 


4,747.09 


5,309.74 


42,808.61 


56,975.41 






Surplus 

Debentures paid 


1,129.76 


1,331.46 


74,963.12 
52,477.61 
30,451.03 


84,664.64 


Local sinking fund 


59,908.04 


Additional operating surplus 


2,230.43 


7,632.85 


45,383.98 


Total surplus 


3,360.19 


8,964.31 


157,891.76 


189,956.66 






Total liabilities, reserves & surplus 


19,837.37 


27,160.59 


540,879.83 


581,239.55 


Per cent of net debt to total assets. 


58.7 


50.7 


69.3 


62.6 



1923 



HYDRO-ELECTRIC POWER COMMISSION 



369 



" A "— Continued 

of Hydro Municipalities as at December 31, 1922 



RIDEAU 
SYSTEM 



Carleton Place 
4,123 


Kemptville 
1,220 


Lanark 

575 


Perth 
3,710 


1921 


1922 


1922 


1921 


1922 


1921 


1922 


$ c. 
5,688.32 


% c 

5,688.32 

2,471.63 

27,199.09 


$ c. 


$ c. 


$ c. 


$ c. 

6,600.50 

3,492.82 

31,271.22 


$ c. 
6,600 50 


2,471.63 








3,492 82 


26,387.48 


15,534.12 


4,578.52 


4,754.70 


32,197.43 


9,488.95 

10,463.95 

683.31 


9,501.27 

11,024.78 

715.65 


2,799.14 

2,943.84 

907.68 


555.01 
797.58 
633.84 


555.01 
924.27 
633 . 84 


13,733.26 

13,442.33 

2,145.21 


14,564.31 

14,678.48 

2,383.07 


8,582.10 


7,934.70 


3,157.27 


260.38 


260.38 


4,659.56 

25,845.26 

2,674.25 


4,686.51 
23,395 26 












2,674.25 












63,765.74 

678.53 


64,535.44 
4,919.88 


25,342.05 
2,605.65 


6,825.33 
2,086.23 


7,128.20 
305.42 


103,864.41 
10,580.60 


104,672.63 
15,250.32 


1,298.78 
4,877.89 


11,710.75 
4,110.07 


4,029.22 
625.10 


228.36 


1,558.21 


7,440.97 
10,685.72 


12,362.87 
10,761 08 




























102.60 






















70,620.94 
922.74 


85,276.14 


32,704.62 


9,139.92 


8,991.83 


132,571.70 


143,046.90 
















71,543.68 


85,276.14 


32,704.62 


9,139.92 


8,991.83 


132,571.70 


143,046.90 


38,389.25 
25,686.68 


63,786.65 
3,815.81 


24,348.59 
1,816.22 


7,561.47 
1,487.30 


7,316.81 


105,688.61 
7,919.56 


104,154.77 
3,261 26 




































64,075.93 


67,602.46 


26,164.81 


9,048.77 


7,316.81 


113,608.17 


107,416.03 


5,857.00 


6,963.83 


444.00 




135.00 


9,462.00 


11,178.00 






















5,857.00 


6,963.83 


444.00 




135.00 


9,462.00 


11,178.00 








1,610.75 


2,213.35 


651.41 




244.66 


2,711.39 


4,245.23 










8,496.50 


5,444.40 


91.15 


1,295.36 


6,790.14 


20,207.64 




1,610.75 


10,709.85 


6,095.81 


91.15 


1,540.02 


9,501.53 


24,452.87 


71,543.68 


85,276.14 


32,704.62 


9,139.92 


8,991.83 


132,571.70 


143,046.90 


94.9 


79.2 


80.0 


99.1 


81.3 


85.7 


75.9 



370 



FIFTEENTH ANNUAL REPORT OF THE 



No. 49 



STATEMENT 
Comparative Balance Sheets of Electrical Departments 



RIDEAU 

SYSTEM— Continued 



Municipality 
Population 


Smiths Falls 
6,529 


RIDEAU 

SYSTEM 

SUMMARY 




1921 


1922 


1921 


1922 


Assets 


$ c 

20,688.10 

4,836.17 

64,753.49 


$ c. 

20,588.10 

4,845.66 

65,211.70 


$ c. 

32,976.92 

10,800.62 

126,990.71 
• 


$ c. 
32,876.92 
10,810.11 


Substation equipment 


Distribution system, overhead.. . . 
Distribution system, underground 


144,897.04 




13,990.74 

20,631.06 

1,801.89 


14,809.63 

21,627.18 

1,801.89 


37,767.96 

45,334.92 

5,264.25 


42,229.36 
51,198.55 


Meters 


Street light equipment, regular. . . 
Street light equip., ornamental . . . 


6,442.13 


Misc. construction expense 

Steam or hydraulic plant 

Old plant 


7,903.05 
38,251.49 
21,508.20 


7,962.50 
38,251.49 
21,473.20 


21,405.09 
64,096 . 75 
24,182.45 


24,001.36 
61,646.75 
24,147.45 






Total plant 


194,364.19 
4,046 . 70 


196,571.35 
3,120.78 


368,819.67 
17,392.06 


398,249.67 
26,202.05 


Bank and cash balance 


Securities and investments 


Accounts receivable 


5,448.49 
10,494.33 


14,230.97 
3,869.27 


14,416.60 
26,057.94 


43,892.02 
19,365.52 




Sinking fund on local debentures. 


Kquity in Hydro systems 










Other assets 








102.60 












Total assets 


214,353.71 
24,284.18 


217,792.37 
13,070.23 


426,686.27 
25,206.92 


487,811.86 


Deficit 


13,070.23 




Total 


238,637.89 


230,862.60 


451,893.19 


500,882.09 






Liabilities 

Debenture balance 


165,797.97 
24,362.29 
10,000.00 


172,558.23 
10,000.00 


317,437.30 
59,455.83 
10,000.00 


372,165.05 
18,893.29 


Accounts payable 


Bank overdraft 


Other liabilities 
















Total liabilities 


200,160.26 


182,558.23 


386,893.13 


391,058.34 




For depreciation 


19,550.60 


23,237.60 


34,869.60 


41,958.43 


For equity in H.E.P.C. system. . . 














Total reserves 


19,550.60 


23,237.60 


34,869.60 


41,958.43 




Surplus 

Debentures paid 


18,927.03 


25,066.77 


23,249.17 


32,421.42 


Local sinking fund . 




Additional operating surplus 






6,881.29 


35,443.90 










Total surplus 


18,927.03 


25,066.77 


30,130.46 


67,865.32 






Total liabilities, reserves & surplus 


238,637.89 


230,862.60 


451,893.19 


500,882.09 


Per cent of net debt to total assets. 


93.5 


83.8 


90.7 


80.1 






1923 



HYDRO-ELECTRIC POWER COMMISSION 



371 



" A "—Continued 

of Hydro Municipalities as at December 31, 1922 



THUNDER BAY 
SYSTEM 


OTTAWA 
SYSTEM 


TRENT 
SYSTEM 


Port Arthur 
15,629 


Ottawa 
112,899 


Bloomfield 
512 


1921 


1922 


1921 


1922 


1921 


1922 


$ c. 

34,553.94 

3,021.38 

247,721.12 


$ c. 

34,528.94 

3,021.38 

250,117.65 


$ c. 

164,520.01 

162,551.81 

419,524.36 

92,237.62 

162,259.06 

152,461.52 

60,963.86 

29,975.55 

33,814.85 


$ c. 

197,516.37 

178,836.46 

457,537.38 

183,576.86 

179,006.07 

167,691.88 

62,599.15 

29,978.05 

33,214.87 


$ c. 


$ c. 






6,394.46 


6,913.85 


23,868.11 
51,951.00 
29,284.75 


27,310.53 
54,415.04 
29,284.75 


1,119.31 

1,276.91 

556.88 


1,119.31 

1,548 . 74 

606.43 


11,728.98 
348,096.93 


11,682.48 
348,096.93 


1,403.42 


1,403.42 






















750,226.21 

18,136.21 
46,315.33 
78,065.76 
32,954.34 
129,166.19 
21,264.86 
827 50 


758,457.70 

77,894.03 
72,599.60 
48,734.43 
20,455.40 
121,402.02 
22,115.45 
910.73 


1,278,308.64 

1,952.25 

50,000.00 

41,001.81 

31,001.74 

231,508.95 


1,489,957.09 
93,768.40 


10,750.98 
1,002.40 


11,591.75 
1,255.21 


48,306.85 

32,341.17 

257,737.79 


23.20 
20.00 


15.72 


























1,076,956.40 


1,122,569.36 


1,633,773.39 


1,922,111.30 


11,796.58 
1,332.84 


12,862.68 
844 . 24 












1,076,956.40 


1,122,569.36 


1,633,773.39 


1,922,111.30 


13,129.42 


13,706.92 


460,447.06 
26,286.04 


444,332 . 60 
84,901.14 


700,000.00 
44,613.33 

128,410.67 
10,801.50 


980,000.00 
80,357.46 


10,790.86 
1,176.42 


10,578.13 
1,528.92 






13,801.55 












500,251.49 


529,233.74 


883,825.50 


1,074,159.01 


11,967.28 


12,107.05 


62,342.55 
21,264.86 


76,998.56 
22,115.45 


403,684.87 


426,480.72 


753.00 


978.00 










83,607.41 




403,684.87 


426,480.72 


753.00 


978.00 


165,652.94 
129,166.19 
198,278.37 


181,767.40 
121,402.02 
191,052.19 






409 . 14 


621.87 


231,508.95 
114,754.07 


257,737.79 
163,733.78 














493,097.50 


494,221.61 


346,263.02 


421,471.57 


409 . 14 


621.87 


1,076,956.40 


1, 122,569. 36 


1,633,773.39 


1,922,111.30 


13,129.42 


13,706.92 


46.4 


48.1 


54.1 


55.8 


101.2 


94.0 



372 



FIFTEENTH ANNUAL REPORT OF THE 



No. 49 



STATEMENT 
Comparative Balance Sheets of Electrical Departments 



TRENT 

SYSTEM— Continued 



Municipality 
Population 


Havelock 
1,258 


Kingston 
22,234 


Lakefield 
1,193 




1921 


1922 


1921 


1922 


1921 


Assets 

Lands and buildings 


$ c. 


$ c. 


$ c 
38,277.09 


$ c. 
40,840.28 


$ c. 


Substation equipment 


572.90 

17,375.82 


572.90 
17,885.65 




Distribution system, overhead.. . . 
Distribution system, underground 
Line transformers 


105,958.85 
44,747.10 
31,600.65 
59,722.55 
17,001.27 
22,669.64 
42,527.08 
76,653.59 
25,048.11 


106,542.67 
49,363.34 
33,522.36 
64,782.23 
17,446.50 
22,669.64 
41,911.33 
76,121.34 
25,598.11 


16,611.30 


1,634.40 
3,998.04 
1,753.49 


1,880.36 
4,277.65 
1,801.28 


1,879.61 


Meters 


3,503.40 
1,367.95 


Street light equipment, regular. . . 
Street light equip., ornamental. . 


Misc. construction expense 

Steam or hydraulic plant 


4,226.31 


4,251.31 


3,232.55 


Old plant 


2,515.45 


2,465.45 


3,744.25 






Total plant 


32,076.41 
119.14 


33,134.60 
186.66 


464,205.93 
22,722.16 


478,797.80 
45,021.32 


30,339.06 
2,013.37 


Bank and cash balance 


Securities and investments. . 




Accounts receivable 


287.41 


366.81 
.95 


10,696.40 
10,675.74 
37,753.05 


12,213.82 
12,584.80 
43,259.70 


3,312.40 


Inventories 


40.95 


Sinking fund on local debentures. 






Equity in Hydro systems 








Other assets 
























Total assets 


32,482.96 


33,689.06 


546,053.28 


591,877.44 


35,705.78 


Deficit 
















Total 


32,482.96 


33,689.06 


546,053.28 


591,877.44 


35,705.78 






Liabilities 


28,114.37 
3,270.48 


27,281.60 
3,659.32 


268,276.10 


263,218.1? 




Debenture balance 


33,112.16 


Accounts payable. . 


1,217.09 


Bank overdraft. . 








Other liabilities. . , 
























Total liabilities 


31,384.85 


30,940.92 


268,276.10 


263,218.18 


34,329.25 






Reserves 

For depreciation . 




528.00 


24,731.67 


23,229.32 


901.00 


For equity in H.E.P.C. system . 


















Total reserves 




528.00 


24,731.67 


23,229.32 


901.00 








Surplus 

Debentures paid 


785.63 


1,618.40 


43,623.89 

37,753.05 

171,668.57 


48,681.81 

43,259.70 

213,488.43 


387.84 


Local sinking fund. . 




Additional operating surplus 


312.48 


601.74 


87.69 


Total surplus 


1,098.11 


2,220.14 


253,045.51 


305,429.94 


475.53 






Total liabilities, reserves & surplus 


32,482.96 


33,689.06 


546,053.28 


591,877.44 


35,705.78 


Per cent of net debt to total assets. 


96.5 


91.8 


49.1 


44.4 


96.0 



923 



HYDRO-ELECTRIC POWER COMMISSION 



373 



" A "—Continued 

of Hydro Municipalities as at December 31, 1921 



Lakefield 


Marmora 
792 


Norwood 

748 


Omemee 

485 


1922 


1921 


1922 


1921 


1922 


1921 


1922 


$ c. 
86 89 


$ c. 


$ c. 


$ c. 


$ c. 


$ c. 


$ c. 








457.53 
22,067.33 


457.53 
22,303 . 50 


360.32 
8,722.92 


360.32 


17,451.46 


11,281.96 


11,288.96 


"8,948.30 


2,100.36 
4,102.52 

1,412.58 


1,046.83 

2,070.15 

891.95 


1,461.98 

2,141.15 

891.95 


2,701.60 
2,814.93 
1,802.02 


3,452.64 
3,676.16 
1,802.02 


2,347.49 

1,555.13 

368.17 


2,347.49 

1,679.16 

393.25 


3,304.42 


1,600.91 


2,000.91 


3,187.42 


3,632.31 


1,426.74 


1,426.74 


3,445.25 


763.77 


579.02 


1,443.21 


2,447.51 












31,903.48 

817 23 


17,655.57 


18,363.97 

1,878.81 


34,474.04 

735.76 


37,771.67 
235.86 


14,780.77 
156.37 


15,155.26 
766 04 








4,729.58 


2,843.42 


1,038.52 


633.45 




564.09 




40.95 






























































37,491.24 


20,498.99 


21,281.30 


35,843.25 


38,007.53 


15,501.23 


15,921.30 
















37,491.24 


20,498.99 


21,281.30 


35,843.25 


38,007.53 


15,501.23 


15,921.30 


32,699.11 
566.06 


17,092.20 

67.72 

1,195.94 


16,483.62 
462.40 


32,681.32 
835.23 


32,237.52 
1,378.12 


10;761.63 
1,967.63 


10,361.10 






105.00 


787.58 
















33,265.17 


18,355.86 


16,946.02 


33,621.55 


34,403.22 


12,729.26 


10,361.10 


1,421.00 




167.15 




634.00 


1,404.00 


1,734 00 














































800.89 


573.91 


1,182.49 


418.68 


862.48 


1,238.37 


1,638.90 


2,004.18 


1,569.22 


2,985.64 


1,803.02 


2,107.83 


129.60 


2,187.30 


2,805.07 


2,143.13 


4,168.13 


2,221.70 


2,970.31 


1,367.97 


3,826.20 


37,491.24 


20,498.99 


21,281.30 


35,843.25 


38,007.53 


15,501.23 


15,921.30 


88.1 


89.4 


88.1 


98.2 


93.8 


82.0 


65.0 



374 



FIFTEENTH ANNUAL REPORT OF THE 



No. 49 



STATEMENT 
Comparative Balance Sheets of Electrical Departments 



TRENT 

SYSTEM— Continued 



Municipality 
Population 


Peterboro 
21,439 


Picton 
3,263 




1921 


1922 


1921 


1922 


Assets 

Lands and buildings 

Substation equipment 

Distribution system, overhead.. . . 
Distribution system, underground 

Line transformers 

Meters ; 

Street light equipment, regular. . . 
Street light equip., ornamental. . . 

Misc. construction expense 

Steam or hydraulic plant 


$ c 

8,899.33 

9,045.24 

109,428.36 


$ c. 

8,899.33 

9,209.85 

118,040.43 


$ c. 

1,405.07 

989.69 

13,897.21 


$ c. 

1,405.07 

989.69 

19,671.45 


58,734.81 
54,878.05 
3,613.80 
26,107.68 
58,153.88 


67,083.01 
58,866.08 
3,537.30 
26,107.68 
57,391.38 


4,000.61 
6,761.15 
1,162.90 


4,432.83 
8,051.88 
1,247.90 


2,738.50 


2,907.43 


Old plant 


17,435.71 


17,435.71 


3,739.98 


3,739.98 


Total plant 


346,196.86 


366,570.77 
4,316.59 


34,695.11 

2,886.46 

5,000.00 

11,941.92 

3,599.16 


42,446.23 


Bank and cash balance . 


1,092.82 


Securities and investments 




10,000.00 


Accounts receivable 


18,203.54 
12,953.23 
29,793.37 


15,671.61 
11,819.64 
36,586.82 


16,682.99 


Inventories 

Sinking fund on local debentures. 
Kquity in Hydro systems 


3,995.24 






Other assets . . . 




















Total assets 

Deficit 


407,147.00 


434,965.43 


58,122.65 


74,217.28 












Total 


407,147.00 


434,965.43 


58,122.65 


74,217.28 


Liabilities 

Debenture balance 


220,000.00 

9,807.23 

50,523.47 

7,097.13 


270,000.00 
17,323.68 


3,732.51 
75.59 


3,412.99 


Accounts payable 








8,719.96 












Total liabilities 


287,427.83 


296,043.64 


3,807.10 


3,412.99 


Reserves 

For depreciation 


44,467.51 


40,253.56 




2,290.39 


For equity in H.E P C system 


















44,467.51 


40,253.56 




2,290.39 








Surplus 

Debentures paid . 






1,997.81 


2,317.33 


Local sinking fund 

Additional operating surplus 


29,793.37 
45,458.29 


62,081.41 




52,3i7.74 


66,196.57 


Total surplus 


75,251.66 


98,668.23 


54,315.55 


68,513.90 


Total liabilities, reserves & surplus 


407,147.00 


434,965.43 


58,122.65 


74,217.28 


Per cent of net debt to total assets. 


70.6 


68.0 


6.5 


4.5 



1923 



HYDRO-ELECTRIC POWER COMMISSION 



375 



" A "—Continued 

of Hydro Municipalities as at December 31, 1922 



Wellington 
840 


East Whitby Township 


West Whitby Township 


1921 


1922 


1921 


1922 


1921 


1922 


$ c. 
200.00 


$ c 
200.00 


$ c. 


$ c. 


$ c. 


$ c. 












10,251.97 


10,733.06 


704.50 


704.50 


9,207.42 


9,207.42 


2,424.44 

2,318.50 

796.02 


2,685.02 

2,707.82 

796.02 


2,459.31 
787,22 


2,459.31 

787.22 


2,329.96 

1,207.75 

721.76 


2,329.96 

1,207.75 

721.76. 








717.28 


717.28 


48.97 


48.97 


33.11 


33.11 


2,477.92 


2,477.92 




















19,186.13 


20,317.12 


4,000.00 


4,000.00 


' 13,500.00 


13,500.00 














15.18 


378.68 
140.71 










136.99 
























































19,338.30 
1,150.23 


20,836.51 


4,000.00 


4,000.00 


13,500.00 


13,500.00 














20,488.53 


20,836.51 


4,000.00 


4,000.00 


13,500.00 


13,500.00 


16,629.59 
1,773.75 


16,409.44 
982.80 
897.17 


3,653.76 


3,524.22 


12,3-31.65 


11,894.55 


544.78 
































18,948.12 


18,289.41 


3,653.76 


3,524.22 


12,331.65 


11,894.55 


1,170.00 


1,544.00 
































1,170.00 


1,544.00 
590.56 










370.41 


346.24 


475.78 


1,168.35 


1,605.45 




412.54 




















370.41 


1,003.10 


346.24 


475.78 


1,168.35 


1,605.45 


20,488.53 


20,836.51 


4,000.00 


4,000.00 


13,500.00 


13,500.00 


97.9 


87.7 


91.3 


88.1 


91.2 


88.1 



376 



FIFTEENTH ANNUAL REPORT OF THE 



No. 49 



STATEMENT 



-Concluded 



Comparative Balance Sheets of Electrical Departments of Hydro 
Municipalities as at December 31, 1922 



TRENT 

SYSTEM— Continued 


ALL 
SYSTEMS 


Municipality 
Population 


TRENT 

SYSTEM 

SUMMARY 


GRAND 
SUMMARY 




1921 


1922 


1921 


1922 


Assets 

Lands and buildings 


$ c 
48,781.49 
11,425.68 

321,990.18 
44,747.10 

107,489.75 

138,898.81 
29,214.45 
48,777.32 

119,214.0? 
76,653.59 
57,168.40 


$ I c. 

51,431.57 
11,590.29 

349,691.25 
49,363.34 

124,874.63 

153,828.36 
30,656.99 
48,777.32 

119,028.61 
76,121.34 
58,188.95 


$ c. 

3,230,985.63 

5,403,689.90 

8,397,361.48 

1,401,135.97 

3,077,649.83 

3,552,076.79 

1,335,997.13 

610,586.70 

3,030,134.16 

704,848.46 

912,388.55 


$ c. 
3,334,522.68 


Substation equipment 


5,046,857.98 


Distribution system, overhead.. . . 
Distribution system, underground 
Line transformers 


11,165,330.24 
1,598,053.02 
3,618,684.73 


Meters 


4,033,689.52 


Street light equipment, regular . . . 
Street light equip., ornamental. . . 

Misc. construction expense 

Steam or hydraulic plant 

Old plant 


1,419,016.05 
666,084.50 

3,261,495.74 
565,158.54 

7,997,947.87 






Total plant 


1,004,360.86 

29,635.66 
5,000.00 
48,521.01 
27,426.07 
67,546.42 


1,073,552.65 

55,570.54 
10,000.00 
51,097.73 
28,582.33 
79,846.52 


31,656,854.60 

900,842.34 

477,678.69 

2,155,788.62 

1,604,596.28 

2,541,718.35 

795,570.51 

78,929.84 


42,706,840.87 


Bank and cash balance 


1,164,336.24 


Securities and investments 

Accounts receivable 


443,938.18 
3,874,317.14 


Inventories 


1,738,795.96 


Sinking fund on local debentures. 
Equity in Hydro systems 


3,416,231.45 
1,543,434.12 


Other assets 






238,940.13 










Total assets 


1,182,490.02 
2,483.07 


1,298,649.77 
844 . 24 


40,111,979.23 
258,486.41 


55,126,834.09 


Deficit 


147,868.55 






Total 


1,184,973.09 


1,299,494.01 


40,370,465.64 


55,274,702.64 






Liabilities 

Debenture balance 


641,190.74 

20,190.14 

52,264.19 

7,202.13 


698,100.46 

25,901.30 

897.17 

9,507.54 


21,619,220.99 

1,887,567.93 

989,099.98 

938,368.84 


30,454,186.12 


Accounts payable 


3,699,292.52 


Bank overdraft 


456,706.69 


Other liabilities 


586,203.02 






Total liabilities 


720,847.20 


734,406.47 


25,434,257.74 


35,196,388.35 






For depreciation 


73,427.18 


72,779.42 


5,491,858.93 
800,249.05 


6,512,813.92 


For equity in H.E.P.C. system 


1,543,434.12 










Total reserves 


73,427.18 


72,779.42 


6,292,107.98 


8,056,248.04 






Surplus 

Debentures paid 


49,805.68 

67,546.42 

273,346.61 


60,395. 9f 

79,846.52 
352,065.64 


1.860.079.53 
2,541,718.35 
4,242,302.04 


3,104,591.15 


Local sinking fund 


3,416,231.45 


Additional operating surplus 


5,501,243.65 


Total surplus 


390,698.71 


492,308.12 


8,644,099.92 


12,022,066.25 






Total liabilities, reserves & surplus 


1,184,973.09 


1,299,494.01 


40,370,465.64 


55,274,702.64 


Per cent of net debt to total assets. 


61.0 


56.5 


64.7 


65.6 



923 



HYDRO-ELECTRIC POWER COMMISSION 



377 



HYDRO-ELECTRIC POWER COMMISSION 
BALANCE SHEETS 

OF THE MUNICIPALITIES OF THE 

NIAGARA, SEVERN, EUGENIA, WASDELLS, MUSKOKA, 
ST. LAWRENCE AND RIDEAU SYSTEMS 

DECEMBER 31, 1922 
being 



Financial Statements Combining the Hydro-Electric Power Commission's 

Plant and Reserves with the Assets, Liabilities and Reserves 

of the 'Hydro' Municipal Utilities 



378 FIFTEENTH ANNUAL REPORT OF THE No. 49 



HYDRO-ELECTRIC POWER COMMISSION BALANCE 
SHEET OF THE MUNICIPALITIES OF THE 
NIAGARA SYSTEM, DECEMBER 31, 1922 



The Commission submits herewith a statement of the Niagara system's 
assets, liabilities, reserves and surpluses reflecting the operations of the Hydro- 
Electric Power Commission of Ontario and the municipalities since the com- 
mencement of operation to December 31, 1922. 

Explanation of the Various Columns of the Balance Sheet 

Column 1- — Gives the names of the municipalities now under contract with 
the Hydro-Electric Power Commission of Ontario for a supply of electrical 
energy generated at Niagara Falls, and the dates upon which each municipality 
commenced to receive this supply of power. 

Column 2 — Gives the average electrical horsepower delivered to each muni- 
cipality by the Hydro-Electric Power Commission of Ontario during the year. 

ASSETS 

Column 3 — Shows the cost of the plant of the Hydro-Electric Power 
Commission of Ontario as annually adjusted and apportioned to each municip- 
ality having a contract with the Commission and receiving power from the sys- 
tem during the year. The whole plant is owned and operated by the Commis- 
sion. It comprises the generating equipment — including the Ontario Power 
Company's plant at Niagara Falls purchased by the Commission in 1917 — also 
the transformer stations and transmission lines necessary to transform the power 
and transmit it to the municipalities supplied from the Niagara system. This 
plant is administered, operated and maintained by the Hydro-Electric Power 
Commission for the contracting municipalities by means of revenue derived 
from the sale, on the basis of COST, of electrical energy to the municipalities 
and to sundry other customers. 

Column 4 — Gives the cost of plants within the boundaries of the respec- 
tive municipalities. These plants are financed, operated and maintained by the 
municipalities from the revenue derived from the utilities' customers. 

Column 5 — Shows the bank balance and investment of surplus funds in 
Government and other authorized securities and investments made by each 
municipal Hydro-electric utility. 

Column 6 — Gives sinking funds, in respect of local plant on deposit with 
municipal treasurers; sinking funds in respect of Commission's plant on deposit 
with Commission and invested in provincial securities, also municipal accounts 
receivable and inventories, together with the sum of $2,475,421.02 on deposit 
with the Hydro-Electric Power Commission of Ontario for the purpose of renew- 
ing its stations and lines. 

Note. — Among other charges, the cost of power to the Commission as 
charged to municipalities includes an annual levy (after the five-year exemption 
period according to the Power Commission Act) for sinking fund for the specific 
purpose of liquidating the Commission's debt to the Provincial Government, 
and also includes a renewals reserve fund for the replacement of transforming 
and transmitting equipment. These accumulations represent a municipal 
equity in present and future plants and therefore the sum of both these funds 
is reflected as an asset. 



1923 HYDRO-ELECTRIC POWER COMMISSION 379 

Column 7 — Totals columns 3, 4, 5 and 6 and shows the total investment 
of each municipality in the Niagara system. 

LIABILITIES 

Column 8 — Gives the municipalities' liability in respect to the Hydro- 
Electric Power Commission's plants. The total of this column represents the 
sum invested by the Commission in stations, lines and generating plants, (see 
column 3) which sum is being repaid by the contracting municipalities by 
deposits to the Commission's sinking fund collected in the cost of power. These 
sinking funds, in accordance with the Power Commission Act, are invested in 
provincial securities. 

Column 9 — Shows the municipal debenture debt in respect of Hydro 
municipal plants within the municipal boundaries. This debt is created by the 
issuance of municipal serial or sinking fund debentures, which, in the majority 
of cases, are redeemable in twenty years. 

Column 10 — Gives the municipal accounts payable and other liabilities 
of the municipalities, also the current liability respecting the Ontario Power 
Company's generating plant at Niagara Falls. 

Column 11 — Gives the total debt of each municipality in respect of local 
plants, the Commission's stations and lines, and also of the Ontario Power 
Company of Niagara Falls. 

RESERVES 

Column 12 — Shows the reserves arising from sinking fund payments and 
municipal debenture retirals in respect of local plants and the Hydro Commis- 
sion's stations and lines. 

Note. — The cost of power to the Commission as charged to municipalities 
includes, amongst other charges, an annual levy (after the five-year exemption 
period provided for in the Power Commission Act) for sinking fund for the pur- 
pose of liquidating the Hydro-Electric Power Commission's debt to the Provincial 
Government. The total of the sums so paid in accordance with provisions of 
the Act, are invested in provincial securities, and amount to- $1,780,533.43. 

Column 13 — Shows reserve fund provided by the municipalities for renew- 
ing local plants and Commission's stations and lines (see column 6). It ajso 
includes the sum of $1,387,736.85 being the reserve for the purpose of renewing 
the development plant of the Ontario Power Company of Niagara Falls. 

Note. — The cost of power to the Commission as charged to municipalities 
includes, amongst other charges, an annual levy in respect of a renewals fund for 
the specific purpose of replacing development plants, transforming and trans- 
mitting equipment. 

SURPLUS 

Column 14 — Shows the sum which municipal Hydro utilities of the Niagara 
system have accumulated after having met, or having made provision to meet, 
every expense on account of interest, operation and maintenance, and after 
meeting all debenture payments, sinking fund, renewal and contingency charges 
both for local systems and for the provincial Hydro properties at present in 
operation. 

Column 15 — Totals reserves and surpluses as given in Columns 12, 13 
and 14. 



380 



FIFTEENTH ANNUAL REPORT OF THE 



No. 49 



STATEMENT COMBINING THE HYDRO-ELECTRIC POWER COMMISSION'S 

OF THE HYDRO MUNICIPAL UTILITIES, 



ASSETS 









Proportionate 

share of 
Hydro-Elec- 




Bank 










Average 


tric Power 


Plant 


balances 




Total assets 






electrical 


Commission's 


value with- 


and 


Accounts 


or 




Date 


horsepower 


plant to 


in the 


invest- 


receivable, 


municipali- 


Municipality 


commenced 


taken 


serve 


boundaries 


ments in 


inventories 


ties' 




operation 


during 


municipalities 


of the 


securities 


and other 


investment 






the year 


as ascer- 


municipali- 


(munici- 


assets 


in Nfagara 






1922 


tained by an- 
nual adjust- 
ment 


ties 


palities 
only) 




system 



NIAGARA 



Acton Jan., 1913 

Ailsa Craig Jan., 1916 

Alvinston April, 1922 

Aylmer Mar., 1918 

Ayr Jan., 1915 

Baden May, 1912 

Beachville Aug., 1912 

Blenheim Nov., 1915 

Bolton Feb., 1915 

Bothwell Sept., 1915 

Brampton Nov., 1911 

Brantford Feb., 1914 

Brigden Jan., 1918 

Burford June, 1915 

Burgessville Nov., 1916 

Caledonia Oct., 1912 

Chatham Feb., 1915 

Chippawa Sept., 1919 

Clinton Mar., 1914 

Comber May, 1915 

Dashwood Sept., 1917 

Delaware Mar., 1915 

Dereham Township Sept., 1919 

Dorchester Dec, 1914 

Drayton Mar., 1918 

Dresden April, 1915 

Drumbo Dec, 1914 

Dublin Oct., 1917 

Dundas Jan., 1911 

Dunnville June, 1918 

Dutton Sept., 1915 

Elmira Nov., 1913 

Elora Nov., 1914 

Embro Jan., 1915 

Etobicoke Township Aug., 1917 

Exeter June, 1916 

Fergus Nov., 1914 

Forest Mar., 1917 

Gait May, 1911 

Georgetown Sept., 1913 

Glencoe Aug., 1920 

Goderich Feb., 1914 

Granton July, 1916 

Guelph Dec, 1910 

Hagersville Sept., 1913 

Hamilton Feb., 1911 

Harriston July, 1916 

Hensall Jan., 1917 

Hespeler Feb., 1911 

Highgate Dec, 1916 

Ingersoll May, 1911 

Kitchener Jan., 1911 

Lambeth April, 1915 

Listowel June, 1916 

London Jan., 1911 

Lucan Feb., 1915 

Lynden Nov., 1915 

Markham April, 1920 

Milton April, 1913 

Milverton June, 1916 

•Denotes shortage. 



249.1 
124.4 

25.9 
199.6 

79.9 

210.4 
271.1 
176.9 
114.1 
136.5 

997.8 

5,152.6 
55.6 
52.1 
25.3 

101.1 

2,742.9 

81.0 

174.8 

104.7 

47.2 
13.1 
57.4 
23.9 
51.3 



160.5 

26.5 

28.1 

,173.8 

296.3 



109.7 
417.5 
244.1 
51.3 
517.5 

204.5 
218.0 
130.3 
3,616.2 
563.1 

72.5 
460.3 

44.8 
4,458.4 
428 



18,832 
191 

54 
447 
42.8 

1,197.8 

7,312.0 

30.9 

412.8 

15,137.0 

178.5 
96. 
77.4 

894.4 

351 



36,641.23 
37,377.93 
31,099.14 
54,655.55 
16,664.90 

28,038.14 
31,680.56 
38,988.04 
40,473.99 
33,282.72 

102,723.76 

330,713.15 

28,448.61 

26,054.44 

7,044.95 

8,596.55 
297,627.44 



43,720.45 
29,223.71 

20,783.97 
4,673.66 

10,347.66 
4,354.97 

26,643.07 

25,274.24 
5,561.28 
10,235.89 
55,004.14 
82,816.04 

18,405.16 
56,931.42 
42,935.43 
18,730.91 
46,617.14 

53,603.18 
39,779.67 
44,778.77 
273,913.77 
104,191.96 

36,947.74 
147,283.42 

13,783.69 
287,598.30 

58,143.55 

1,506,231.82 
52,313.23 
24,157.00 
37,494.33 
14,204.31 

101,737.64 

517,005.12 

11,024.12 

74,520.49 

1,079,944.93 

30,293.63 
24,206.53 
18,974.76 
103,995.01 
52,123.10 



28,953.69 
11,134.61 

22,206.71 
43,637.51 
15,470.75 

9,055.65 
11,817.43 
29,252.29 
21,031.52 

7,972.57 

100,968.07 

551,347.20 

10,573.84 

9,847.55 

3,974.98 

12,057.36 

400,187.23 

17,738.55 

48,008.62 

9,775.34 

4,237.09 
3,302.10 

24,557.21 
8,431.78 

10,631.93 

25,481.99 

4,868.46 

6,516.98 

101,307.48 

85,271.27 

12,271.38 

40,587.08 

23,114.74 

9,628.38 

121,855.70 

27,001.84 
35,271.42 
41,475.79 
690,913.39 
41,066.27 

24,781.42 

109,806.87 

4,891.90 

349,729.46 

21,385.23 

1,867,729.29 

19,223.02 

12,755.26 

59,636.86 

7,338.11 

126,438.64 

592,398.81 

7,621.26 

63,738.48 

1,752,008.29 

16,407.60 
5,298.74 
16,481.04 
39,286.39 
16,999.22 



$ c 
2,922.18 
5,640.85 
1,878.61 
9,615.29 
1,886.07 

6,315.96 
10,743.66 



4,597.12 

38,484.10 

7,971.72 

683.66 

580.58 

1,171.28 

1,171.73 

50.00 

169.96 

3,713.50 



1.40 

615.11 

1,523.58 

1,505.54 

3,482.53 

4,015.94 
863.79 
130.86 

5,101.36 



4,547.38 
1,100.68 
1,343.50 
1,002.27 
50.00 

3,134.66 



3,489.05 

825.00 

18,082.65 

1,559.50 



2,497.32 

25,062.50 

2,056.42 

119,081.21 

139.73 

2,957.53 

935.23 

1,811.51 

20,500.00 

24,047.78 

126.33 

70.78 

9,058.93 

8,267.24 
467.10 

"7,382.36 



c c. 

12,126.55 

6,149.20 

323.27 

8,077.95 

5,456.25 

10,455.34 
11,205.07 
9,982.08 
10,341.72 
11,265.68 

30,940.46 

144,900.70 

4,617.42 

4,695.62 

1,043.68 

2,435.54 

125,488.66 

1.180.16 

23,187.80 

5,811.60 

2,858.57 
2,884.70 
3,972.25 
1,892.18 
3,637.52 

8,480.02 

2,588.94 

985.00 

25,737.85 
12,153.67 

4,779.52 
15,943.39 
12,487.12 

4,928.94 
14,154.79 

16,298.03 
17,478.40 
12,552.33 
232,033.99 
31,371.35 

4,127.65 

56,138.14 

2,521.15 

163,397.64 

14,709.26 

749,716.46 
11,760.56 

4,827.48 
15,372.54 

3,049.39 

74,922.99 

179,839.77 

3,172.55 

14,918.20 

1,017,819.84 

7,287.53 

6,009.20 

3,547.58 

30,819.13 

11,008.77 



80,643.65 
60,302.59 
55,507.73 
115,986.30 
39,477.97 

53,865.09 
65,446.72 
78,222.41 
71,847.23 
57,118.09 

273,116.39 

1,034,932.77 

44,323.53 

41,178.19 

13,234.89 

24,261.18 
823,353.33 

19,088.67 
118,630.37 

44,810.65 

27,881.03 
11,475.57 
40,400.70 
16.184.47 
44,395.05 

63,252.19 

13,882.47 

17,868.73 

187,150.83 

180,240.98 

40,003.44 

114,562.57 

79,880.79 

34,290.50 

182,677.63 

100,037.71 

92,529.49 

102,295.94 

1,197,691.15 

194,712.23 

67,416.31 
313,228.43 

23,694.06 
825,787.90 

96,294.46 

4,242,758.78 

83,436.54 

44,697.27 

113,438.96 

26,403.32 

323,599.27 

1,313,291.48 

21,944.26 

153,247.95 
3,858,831.99 

62,256.00 
35,981.57 
39,003.38 
181,482.83 
80.131.09 



1923 



HYDRO-ELECTRIC POWER COMMISSION 



381 



PLANT AND RESERVES WITH THE ASSETS, LIABILITIES AND RESERVES 
AS AT 31st DECEMBER, 1922 





LIABILITIES 




RESERVES AND SURPLUSES 


Municipalities' 




Accounts 




Debentures 








liability in 




payable 




paid, 






Total 


respect to Hvdro- 


Municipal 


and other 


Total 


sinking 


Plant 




reserves 


Electric Power 


debenture 


liabilities 


liabilities 


fund 


renewal 


Surplus 


and 


Commission's 


balances 


(municipali- 




and other 


reserves 




surpluses 


plants 




ties only) 




reserves 









SYSTEM 



$ c. 
36.641.23 
37,377.93 
31,099.14 
54,655.55 
16,664.90 


$ c. 
5,646.50 
6,302.26 
1,875.57 
31,138.55 
7,442.03 


$ c. 

129.33 

146.40 

22,237.90 

90.76 

10.06 


$ c 
42,417.06 
43,826.59 
55,212.61 
85,884.86 
24,116.99 


$ c. 

11,897.04 

1,749.34 

280.25 

8,080.96 

5,970.36 


$ c. 

11,956.39 

7,080.16 

277.86 

9,166.67 

6,181.26 


$ c. 

14,373.16 

7,646.50 

*262.99 

12,853.81 

3,209.36 


$ c. 
38,226.59 
16,476.00 

295.12 
30,101.44 
15,360.98 


28,038.14 
31,680.56 
38,988.04 
40,473.99 
33.282.72 


3,930.83 

4,233.43 

12,513.58 

10,654.47 

4,469.13 


684.27 

931.07 

4,143.69 

6,602.05 

1,420.26 


32,653.24 
36,845.06 
55,645.31 
57,730.51 
39,172.11 


4,300.28 
4,569.96 
3,263.52 
3,607.45 
2,749.75 


9,516.60 
11,157.85 
11,929.19 
13,035.52 

9,114.67 


7,394.97 
12,873.85 

7,384.39 
*2,527.25 

6,081.56 


21,211.85 
28,601.66 
22,577.10 
14,116.72 
17,945.98 


102,723.76 

330,713.15 

28,448.61 

26,054.44 

7,044.95 


47,736.29 

398,750.00 

3,712.67 

3,575.84 

2,700.62 


5,365.70 

47,526.43 

1,832.27 

2,613.68 

229.61 


155,825.75 

776,989.58 

33,993.55 

32,243.96 

9,975.18 


31,864.31 

98,651.80 

4,490.75 

1,849.43 

936.75 


51,786.49 

119,761.09 

4,656.27 

5,126.93 

1,788.86 


33,639.84 

39,530.30 

1,182.96 

1,957.87 

534.10 


117,290.64 

257,943.19 

10,329.98 

8,934.23 

3,259.71 


8,596.55 
297,627.44 


3,789.86 

273,966.34 

12,543.09 

40,500.00 

5,898.12 


.70 

81,365.03 

195.22 

369.30 

186.09 


12,387.11 
652,958.81 
12,738.31 
84,589.75 
35,307.92 


1,700.21 

35,961.35 

983.42 

10,867.59 

2,758.34 


4,365.54 
81,467.52 

1,181.25 
18,379.04 

6,376.74 


5,808.32 

52,965.65 

4,185.69 

4,793.99 

367.65 


11,874.07 

170,394.52 

6 350 36 


43,720.45 
29,223.71 


34,040.62 
9,502.73 


20,783.97 
4,673.66 

10,347.66 
4,354.97 

26,643.07 


3,076.77 
3,424.98 
20,001.12 
3,773.06 
8,822.61 


20.39 

257.60 

5,719.96 


23,881.13 
8,356.24 

36,068.74 
8,128.03 

35,465.68 


461.54 
755.02 
3,584.68 
834.08 
824.02 


3,416.15 
1,607.81 
5,945.65 
2,571.90 
4,812.65 


122.21 

756.50 

*5, 198.37 

4,650.46 

3,292.70 


3,999.90 
3,119.33 
4,331.96 
8,056.44 
8,929.37 


25,274.24 
5,561.28 
10,235.89 
55,004.14 
82.816.04 


11.055.81 

3,853.20 

5,106.08 

43,791.37 

60,320.43 


'67l'. 40 

4,638.76 
8,049.36 


36,330.05 
9,414.48 

16,013.37 
103,434.27 
151,185.83 


6,499.62 
1,040.25 
1,173.07 
18,568.51 
5,929.01 


10,018.09 

2,480.41 

1,732.94 

38,911.11 

16,560.59 


10,404.43 

947.33 

*1,050.65 

26,236.94 

6,565.55 


26.922.14 

4,467.99 

1,855.36 

83,716.56 

29,055.15 


18,405.16 
56,931.42 
42,935.43 
18,730.91 
46,617.14 


7,606.32 
17,092.94 
10.097.03 

6,850.91 
69.617.84 


92.66 

' 1,646.63 
6,233.41 


26,011.48 
74,116.36 
53,032.46 
27,228.45 
122,468.39 


1,717.90 
6,418.09 
5,654.12 
1,792.08 
14,307.03 


6,430.09 
16,842.00 
12,740.89 

6,301.34 
25,149.35 


5,843.97 
17,186.12 

8,453.32 
*1,031.37 
20,752.86 


13,991.96 
40.446.21 
26,848.33 
7,062.05 
60,209.24 


53,603.18 
39,779.67 
44,778.77 
273,913.77 
104,191.96 


16.588.13 
13,852.61 
24,172.18 
387,565.04 
17,092.91 


1,699.96 

15,337.57 

1,369.89 

190,128.10 


71,891.27 

68,969.85 

70,320.84 

851,606.91 

121,284.87 


6,481.80 
4,342.44 

10,575.80 
114,166.10 

10,248.08 


12,297.19 
12,723.89 
11,011.43 
128,546.36 
32,952.59 


9,367.45 
6,493.31 

10,387.87 
103,371.78 

30,226.69 


28,146.44 
23,559.64 
31,975.10 
346,084.24 
73.427.36 


36,947.74 
147,283.42 

13,783.69 
287,598.30 

58,143.55 


19,052.03 
39,184.51 

3,128.39 
93,079.38 

6,426.62 


697.21 
16,416.82 

592.78 
55,750.25 


56,696.98 
202,884.75 

17,504.86 
436,427.93 

64,570.17 


2,404.56 

29,857.16 

690.29 

106,771.37 

5,034.12 


2,838.93 

58,941.04 

3,136.25 

122,134.26 

9,311.80 


5,475.84 
21,545.48 

2,362.66 

160,454.34 

17,378.37 


10,719.33 

110,343.68 

6,189.20 

389,359.97 

31,724.29 


1,506,231.82 
52,313.23 
24,157.00 
37,494.33 
14,204.31 


1,489,920.31 

9,470.62 

10,875.15 

28,878.71 

4,488.11 


242,050.86 
3,476.35 
1,606.52 

4,572.21 


3,238,202.99 
65,260.20 
36,638.67 
70,945.25 
18,692.42 


383,904.83 

5,153.54 

2,104.20 

23,557.98 

870.24 


494,480.49 

10,935.28 

6,378.44 

13,283.35 

3,744.20 


126,170.47 

2,087.52 

*424.04 

5,652.38 

3,096,45 


1,004,555.79 

18,176.34 

8,058.60 

42,493.71 

7,710.90 


101,737.64 

517,005.12 

11,024.12 

74,520.49 

1,079,944.93 


79,800.00 

184,081.14 

3,571.01 

31,654.64 

1,045,575.19 


7,462.02 

104,151.44 

1,123.34 

7,994.52 

410,716.60 


188,999.66 

805,237.70 

15,718.47 

114,169.65 

2,536,236.72 


38,464.72 

177,287.59 

656.26 

13,619.96 
425.706.70 


46,083.72 

201,130.08 

3,090.25 

18,408.86 
535,460.75 


50,051.17 

129,636.11 

2,479.28 

7,049.48 

361,427.82 


134,599.61 

508,053.78 

6,225.79 

39,078.30 

1,322,595.27 


30,293.63 
24,206.53 


8,761.29 
3,981.91 
9,888.45 
12,370.36 

7,247.23 





39,054.92 
28,188.44 
28,892.27 
120,180.16 
59,908.78 


3,879.44 
1,704.60 
1,816.14 
18,922.36 
3,622.34 


8,598.46 
5,679.87 
2,170.64 
27,335.96 
8,841.70 


10,723.18 

408.66 

6,124.33 

15,044.35 

7,758.27 


23,201.08 
7,793.13 
10,111.11 
61,302.67 
20,222.31 


18,974.76 

103.995.01 

52,123.10 


29.06 

3,814.79 

538.45 



382 



FIFTEENTH ANNUAL REPORT OF THE 



No. 49 



STATEMENT COMBINING 



THE HYDRO-ELECTRIC POWER COMMISSION'S 
OF THE HYDRO MUNICIPAL UTILITIES, 



ASSETS 









Proportionate 
















share of 
















Hydro-Elec- 




Bank 










Average 


tric Power 


Plant 


balances 




Total assets 






electrical 


Commission's 


value with- 


and 


Accounts 


or 




Date 


horsepower 


plant to 


in the 


invest- 


receivable, 


municipali- 


Municipality 


commenced 


taken 


serve 


boundaries 


ments in 


inventories 


ties' 




operation 


during 


municipalities 


of the 


securities 


and other 


investment 






the year 


as ascer- 


municipali- 


(munici- 


assets 


in Niagara 






1922 


tained by an- 
nual adjust- 
ment 


ties 


palities 
only) 




system 



NIAGARA 



Mimico May, 1912 

Mitchell Sept., 1911 

Moorefield Mar., 1918 

Mount Brydges Mar., 1915 

Newbury Mar., 1921 

New Hamburg Mar., 1911 

New Toronto Feb., 1914 

Niagara Falls Dec, 1915 

Niagara-on-Lake Aug., 1919 

Norwich May, 1912 

Oil Springs Feb., 1918 

Otterville Feb., 1916 

Palmerston July, 1916 

Paris Feb., 1914 

Parkhill May, 1920 



Petrolia May, 

Plattsville Dec, 

Port Credit Aug., 

Port Dover Dec, 

Port Stanley April, 

Preston Jan., 

Princeton Jan., 

Queenston Mar., 

Ridgetown Dec, 

Rockwood Sept., 

Rodney Feb., 

St. George Sept., 

St. Jacobs Sept., 

St. Marys May, 

St. Thomas April, 

Sarnia Dec, 

Scarboro Township Aug., 

Seaforth Nov., 

Simcoe Aug., 

Springfield Aug., 

Stamford Township .... Nov., 

Stratford Jan., 

Strathroy Dec, 

Tavistock Nov., 

Thamesford Feb., 



Thamesville. 
Thedford.... 
Thorndale. . . 

Tilbury 

Tillsonburg. 



Toronto 

Toronto Township , 

Walkerville 

Wallaceburg 

Wardsville 



Waterdown , 
Waterford . . 
Waterloo. . . 
Watford. ... 
Welland . . . 



Wellesley. . . 
West Lome . 

Weston 

Windsor 
Woodbridge. 



Oct., 
May, 
Mar., 
April, 
Aug., 

June, 
Aug., 
Nov., 
Feb., 
June, 

Nov., 
April, 
Dec, 
Sept., 
Sept., 

Nov., 
Jan., 
Jan., 
Oct., 
Dec. 



1916 
1914 
1912 
1921 
1912 

1911 

1915 
1921 
1915 
1913 

1917 
1915 
1917 
1911 
1911 

1916 
1918 
1911 
1915 
1917 

1916 
1911 
1914 
1916 
1914 

1915 
1922 
1914 
1915 
1911 

1911 
1913 
1914 
1915 
1921 

1911 

1915 
1910 
1917 
1917 

1916 
1917 
1911 
1914 
1914 



595.1 

224.2 

30.7 

27.3 

24.5 

245.1 

1,803.9 

4,050.9 

185.7 

248.7 

212.6 

40.4 

197.2 

897.6 

61.9 

611.0 
28.9 

143.2 
58.1 

207.0 

1,808.1 

18.5 

36.6 

205.2 

50.7 

67.8 

72.9 

66.2 

892.8 

2,742.8 

3,297.9 

295.3 

339.7 

348.4 

18.6 

473.3 

2,955.9 

453.7 

275.3 

99.6 

79.1 

15.2 

47.8 

186.6 

364.3 

73,676.9 

288.8 

4,401.9 

787.1 

11.3 

137.5 
171.2 

1,468.0 
68.1 

1,711.5 

132.4 

176.5 

1,195.4 

7,166.3 

180.6 



$ c 

58,465.72 

33,708.58 

14,060.06 

9,739.76 

9,378.28 

35,102.77 

171,347.96 

39,269.58 

7,998.19 

38,139.16 

39,503.84 
10,173.58 
40,943.24 
65,850.42 
34,399.18 

93,825.09 
15,561.28 
21,430.11 
20,483.53 
42,727.88 

128,079.07 

9,294.16 

800.07 

40,667.08 

14,590.85 

15,981.58 
6,471.84 

10,143.36 
106,761.28 
239,026.38 

501,993.95 

17,598.46 

63,449.95 

38,816.64 

8,999.28 

9,747.62 

289,592.57 

84,136.77 

47,760.33 

22,315.14 

16,984.29 
20,144.17 
15,940.62 
33,916.41 
61,993.86 

4,519,247.27 

25,426.17 

625,776.06 

124,703.74 

6,832.59 

18,960.08 
21,067.73 
107,984.45 
31,616.87 
89,950.29 

29,715.82 

32,393.34 

112,203.64 

1,011,472.81 

28,171.72 



$ c 

77,501.79 

53,167.24 

4,735.35 

5,103.06 

9,132.73 

32,958.30 
67,213.47 
490,617.36 
21,537.29 
25,662.67 

21,554.44 

7,028.84 

31,939.13 

119,625.70 

19,583.23 

72,749.38 
5,801.50 
19,007.62 
28,555.11 
32,347.81 

179,998.60 

3,707.92 

10,316.85 

30,570.64 

9,313.81 

12,149.85 

6,611.29 

6,857.23 

118,364.49 

329,930.04 

488,958.06 

87,798.11 

47,579.92 

55,653.73 

6,813.80 

109,833.27 

446,465.59 

72,273.56 

13,866.57 

8,828.22 

15,392.58 
13,017.64 
4,804.14 
20,577.00 
65,654.81 

21,617,537.68 

113,893.25 

425,800.65 

91,214.37 

6,676.91 

15,224.64 
17,970.52 

188,122.80 
17,489.00 

259,267.34 

8,672.65 

13,042.41 

105,185.39 

1,426,350.59 

14,732.28 



$ c 
1,606.30 
4,470.04 

959.15 
2,457.03 

207.03 

889.04 

12,301.12 

26,054.23 

1,745.67 

9,247.33 

1,467.47 
3,258.18 
1,935.55 

1 ,729.02 

4,000.00 

69.02 

5,279.01 



2,769.81 

50.00 

740.19 

542.74 

16,892.15 

148.83 

2,614.79 
6,169.83 
3,737.80 

20,693.93 

594.21 

2,533.69 

10,696.69 

6,000.00 

272.73 

1,101.14 
28,177.56 
4,099.62 
9,264.06 
1,920.88 

4,449.09 

3,319.74 

762.56 



14,628.68 

444,846.09 

12,077.88 

50.00 

11,409.14 

1,936.64 

6,374.00 

3,810.26 

1,022.27 

147.02 

100.00 

2,748.08 
5,408.66 
5,515.73 
11,193.03 
6,945.57 



$ c 

10,690.42 

17,588.09 

1,758.11 

3,667.45 

1,328.02 

20,113.13 
56,775.35 
48,804.02 
1,267.35 
17,827.80 

6,767.96 

1,430.92 

18,332.09 

38,301.36 

2,390.26 

28,937.50 

6,985.88 

3,231.54 

289.44 

16,493.85 

43,381.73 

2,587.18 

89.35 

13,213.37 
4,788.36 

3,810.11 

4,168.61 

2,153.92 

50,643.69 

148,616.03 

109,227.07 

8,201.03 

46,808.05 

8,563.08 

1,596.28 

7,363.44 

208,709.87 

33,465.29 

10,043.09 

6,793.41 

6,083.32 

329.48 

5,264.40 

9,544.74 

42,113.62 

6022,162.74 

10,511.73 

287,532.93 

60,738.74 

148.05 

6,501.54 

4,580.39 

50,156.96 

6,734.47 

139,167.46 

4,878.77 

4,533.34 

34,516.21 

526,350.08 

6,133.83 



$ c 
148,264.23 
108,933.95 
21,512.67 
20,967.30 
20,046.06 

89,063.24 

307,637.90 

604,745.19 

32,548.50 

90,876.96 

69,293.71 
21,891.52 
93,150.01 
223,777.48 
58,101.69 

199,511.97 
28,417.68 
48,948.28 
49,328.08 
94,339.35 

351,509.40 
16,329.45 
11,749.01 

101,343.24 
28,841.85 

34,556.33 

23,421.57 

22,892.31 

275,769.46 

738,266.38 

1,100,773.29 

116,131.29 

168,534.61 

109,033.45 

17,682.09 

128,045.47 

972,945.59 

193,975.24 

80,934.05 

39,857.65 

42,909.28 
36,811.03 
26,771.72 
64,038.15 
184 390.97 

32,603,793.78 

161.909.03 

1,339,159.64 

288,065.99 

15,594.19 

47,060.26 
47,428.89 

347,286.48 
55,987.36 

488,485.09 

46,015.32 

55,377.75 

257,420.97 

2,975,366.51 

55,983.40 



'Denotes shortage. 



1923 



HYDRO-ELECTRIC POWER COMMISSION 



383 



PLANT AND RESERVES WITH THE ASSETS, LIABILITIES AND RESERVES 
AS AT 31st DECEMBER, 1922— Continued 



LIABILITIES 


RESERVES AND SURPLUSES 


Municipalities' 




Accounts 




Debentures 






Total 


liability in 


Municipal 


payable 




paid, 


Plant 




reserves 


respect to Hydro- 


debenture 


and other 


Total 


sinking 


renewal 


Surplus 


and 


Electric Power 


balances 


liabilities 


liabilities 


fund 


reserve 




surpluses 


Commission's 




(municipali- 




and other 








plants 




ties only) 




reserves 








SYSTEM 


$ c. 


$ c. 


$ c. 


$ c. 


$ c. 


$ c. 


$ c. 


$ c. 


58,465.72 


39,740.51 


7,302.96 


105,509.19 


9,412.89 


19,727.02 


13,615.13 


42,755.04 


33,708.58 


6,191.39 


736.76 


40,636.73 


20,172.77 


25,573.86 


22,550.59 


68,297.22 


14,060.06 


3,795.21 


232.49 


18,087.76 


788.14 


2,208.76 


428.01 


3,424.91 


9,739.76 


3,653.53 




13,393.29 


1,094.35 


3,698.81 


2,780.85 


7,574.01 


9,378.28 


8,700.00 


398.84 


18,477.12 


1,091.55 


399.14 


78.25 


1,568.94 


35,102.77 


13,687.67 


38.62 


48,829.06 


8,411.15 


20,388.40 


11,434.63 


40,234.18 


171,347.96 


6,672.25 


11,628.36 


189,648.57 


18,795.57 


42,029.92 


57,163.84 


117,989.33 


39,269.58 


326,751.25 


23,539.77 


389,560.60 


114,371.15 


44,785.55 


56,027.89 


215,184.59 


7,998.19 


7,738.45 


434.65 


16,171.29 


3,573.67 


1,930.63 


10,872.91 


16,377.21 


38,139.16 


10,955.66 


1,189.02 


50,283.84 


6,532.16 


20,422.48 


13,638.48 


40,593.12 


39,503.84 


14,607.58 


2,755.64 


56,867.06 


2,544.38 


4,795.86 


5,086.41 


12,426.65 


10,173.58 


3,473.18 


50.47 


13,697.23 


1,192.26 


2,421.73 


4,580.30 


8,194.29 


40,943.24 


13,049.37 


799.26 


54,791.87 


15,127.91 


10,180.74 


13,049.49 


38,358.14 


65,850.42 


42,952.71 


2,418.65 


111,221.78 


62,125.54 


35,942:43 


14,487.73 


112,555.70 


34,399.18 


13,356.07 




47,755.25 


1,230.95 


2,708.77 


6,406.72 


10,346.44 


93,825.09 


43,161.13 


5,053.31 


142,039.53 


9,991.98 


25,158.83 


22,321.63 


57,472.44 


15,561.28 


4,484.30 


1,452.07 


21,497.65 


2,297.38 


6,749.92 


*2, 127.27 


6,920.03 


21,430.11 


5,896.04 


1,192.99 


28,519.14 


3,610.67 


7,354.37 


9,464.10 


20,429.14 


20,483.53 


19,824.01 


6,423.50 


46,731.04 


1,235.61 


756.82 


604.61 


2,597.04 


42,727.88 


14,569.34 


13.90 


57,311.12 


8,477.06 


19,388.29 


9,162.88 


37,028.23 


128,079.07 


55,922.29 


36,387.33 


220,388.69 


52,320.00 


61,662.42 


17,138.29 


131,120.71 


9,294.16 


3,039.75 


1,070.78 


13,404.69 


1,090.26 


2,826.81 


*992.31 


2,924.76 


800.07 


7,782.52 


2,127.32 


10,709.91 


276.40 


187.94 


574.76 


1,039.10 


40,667.08 


13,754.34 


1,319.10 


55,740.52 


7,716.26 


12,633.01 


25,253.45 


45,602.72 


14,590.85 




678.83 


15,269.68 
23,673.34 


3,026.07 


5,958.89 


4,587.21 


13,572.17 


15,981.58 


7,691.76 




984.76 


4,009.80 


5,888.43 


10,882.99 


6,471.84 


5,194.69 


50.43 


11,716.96 


1,470.49 


4,097.09 


6,137.03 


11,704.61 


10,143.36 


5,039.51 


134.00 


15,316.87 


1,160.94 


2,518.71 


3,895.79 


7,575.44 


106,761.28 


41,757.81 


9,903.65 


158,422.74 


54,730.06 


54,044.95 


8,571.71 


117,346.72 


239,026.38 


86,319.25 


28,259.07 


353,604.70 


88,684.22 


130,544.54 


165,432.92 


384,661.68 


501,993.95 


258,907.19 


25,028.18 


785,929.32 


53,235.57 


113,661.58 


147,946.82 


314,843.97 


17,598.46 


38,510.53 


36,412.52 


92,521.51 


7,162.47 


9,082.96 


• 7,364.35 


23,609.78 


63,449.95 


25,000.00 


2,059.86 


90,509.81 


16,406.48 


38,791.57 


22,826.75 


78,024.80 


38,816.64 


34,631.60 


4,578.29 


78,026.53 


2,150.33 


14,229.75 


14,626.84 


31,006.92 


8,999.28 


2,296.00 


95.12 


11,390.40 


2,784.85 


1,379.60 


2,127.24 


6,291.69 


9,747.62 


72,734.60 


18,528.42 


101,010.64 


6,571.91 


9,547.51 


10,915.41 


27,034.83 


289,592.57 


362,000.00 


7,272.74 


658,865.31 


126,392.36 


137,872.04 


49,815.88 


314,080.28 


84,136.77 


34,963.01 




119,099.78 


16,309.48 


28,020.21 


30,545.77 


74,875.46 


47,760.33 


5,385.71 




53,146.04 


1,825.12 


8,634.36 


17,328.53 


27,788.01 


22,315.14 


4,174.62 


"320.51 


26,810.27 


2,482.63 


6,722.38 


3,842.37 


13,047.38 


16,984.29 


9,115.03 




26,099.32 


2,951.86 


6,118.15 


7,739.95 


16,809.96 


20,144.17 


16,051.45 


V.29 


36,202.91 


464.15 


139.30 


4.67 


608.12 


15,940.62 


2,468.57 


1,440.20 


19,849.39 


2,188.90 


4,722.00 


11.43 


6,922.33 


33,916.41 


11,930.70 


292.33 


46,139.44 


3,517.95 


9,262.36 


5,118.40 


17,898.71 


61,993.86 


27,749.84 


4,439.85 


94,183.55 


22,667.62 


41,613.30 


25,926.50 


90,207.42 


4,519,247.27 


17,614,650.51 


1,912,331.88 


24,046,229.66 


3,655,906.79 


3,641,969.02 


1,259,688.31 


8,557,564.12 


25,426.17 


76,261.78 


995.00 


102,682.95 


4,460.60 


27,867.86 


26,897.62 


59,226.08 


625,776.06 


218,338.47 


152,409.67 


996,524,20 


76,243.79 


155,448.40 


110,943.25 


342,635.44 


124,703.74 


64,283.81 


3,776.83 


192,764.38 


13,284.53 


37,373.52 


44,643.56 


95,301.61 


6,832.59 


7,344.92 


357.98 


14,535.49 


231.98 


253.55 


573.17 


1,058.70 


18,960.08 


4,570.67 


3.02 


23,533.77 


5,556.47 


12,759.08 


5,210.94 


23,526.49 


21,067.73 




242.76 


21,310.49 


8,849.93 


6,624.64 


10,643.83 


26,118.40 


107,984.45 


"91,945.69 


5,702.39 


205,632.53 


30,749.93 


66,925.85 


43,978.17 


141,653.95 


31,616.87 


7,629.10 


595.37 


39,841.34 


2,273.70 


7,248.43 


6,623.89 


16,146.02 


89,950.29 


199,048.54 


85,539.40 


374,538.23 


42,712.59 


74,828.05 


*3,593.78 


113,946.86 


29,715.82 


6,077.86 


193.12 


35,986.80 


2,179.09 


6,802.51 


2,046.92 


11,028.52 


32,393.34 


7,294.15 




39,687.49 


1,259.13 


4,037.26 


10,393.87 


15,690.26 


112,203.64 


37,907.21 


8,344.64 


158,455.49 


18,856.22 


41,490.43 


38,618.83 


98,965.48 


1,011,472.81 


1,082,316.60 


330,472.58 


2,424,261.99 


142,427.82 


211,147.55 


197,529.15 


551,104.52 


28,171.72 


7,529.91 


839.21 


36,540.84 


2,546.55 


7,615.55 


9,280.45 


19,442.56 



384 



FIFTEENTH ANNUAL REPORT OF THE 



No. 49 



STATEMENT COMBINING THE HYDRO-ELECTRIC POWER COMMISSION'S 

OF THE HYDRO MUNICIPAL UTILITIES, 



ASSETS 









Proportionate 
















share of 
















Hydro-Elec- 




Bank 










Average 


tric Power 


Plant 


balances 




Total assets 






electrical 


Commission's 


value with- 


and 


Accounts 


or 




Date 


horsepower 


plant to 


in the 


invest- 


receivable, 


municipali- 


Municipality 


commenced 


taken 


serve 


boundaries 


ments in 


inventories 


ties' 




operation 


during 


municipalities 


of the 


securities 


and other 


investment 






the year 


as ascer- 


municipali- 


(munici- 


assets 


in Niagara 






1922 


tained by an- 
nual adjust- 
ment 


ties 


palities 
only) 




System 



NIAGARA 



Woodstock Jan., 1911 

Wyoming Nov., 1916 

Zurich Sept., 1917 

Merritton Nov., 1920 


2,142.5 
38.7 
51.2 

217.3 

4,222.1 

162.9 

39.0 

473.4 


$ c. 

139,769.50 

12,729.42 

26,682.21 


$ c. 

264,213.75 

9,926.56 

6,876.44 

28,269.35 
435,158.57 
25,287.60 
16,386.89 
70,533.48 

12,183.41 
72,548.30 
7,835.78 
15,732.30 
38,206.80 

5,992.66 
26,120.45 


$ c. 

944.37 
1,156.22 
5,063.42 

1,061.86 

1,316.41 

1,743.19 

633.04 

201.99 


$ c. 

74,804.87 

4,390.29 

4,017.42 

2,309.32 
48,169.85 
5,215.66 
9,304.85 
7,727.62 

1,816.59 
2,294.22 
2,239.97 


$ c 
479,732.49 
28,202 49 
42,639.49 

31,640.53 


St. Catharines 

Port Dalhousie Nov., 1912 

Grantham Township . May, 1915 
Port Colborne Mar., 1920 


19,383.54 

5,834.33 

28,289.47 


504,028.37 
38,080.78 
54,614.25 
78,463.09 


Belle River 




14,000.00 


Ford 








74,842.52 










10,075.75 










15,732.30 










1,450.28 

3,854.42 
309.12 

714.21 

462.84 

1,247.06 

1,577.65 

773.88 

4,527.89 
291.23 

2,529.48 

68.21 

792.12 

193.90 

508.69 

913.69 

6,346.63 

2,545.99 

5,868.62 
554.92 
859.30 
266.49 

3,199.01 


39,657.08 


St. Clair Beach 








9,847.08 










26,429.57 


Rural Power Districts. 


6.7 
19.9 

3.2 
26.0 

3.2 

42.1 
3.2 
5.4 

.5 


6,218.61 
10,629.67 

8,914.26 
23,592.83 
17,378.88 

45,424.51 
9,787.62 

16,168.88 

1,963.50 

495.90 

2,103.45 

8,449.72 

8,102.12 

37,952.16 

27,938.48 

100,321.46 

4,421.54 

10,164.85 

3,533.32 

1,536.69 




6,932.82 








11,092.51 


Brant 






10,161.32 








25,170.48 








18,152.76 








49,952.40 








10,078.85 








18,698.36 


Gait 






2,031.71 








1,288.02 




1.8 

6.6 

15.0 

99.5 

14.1 

69.1 
5.8 

10.2 
3.6 






2,297.35 








8,958.41 








9,015.81 








44,298.79 








30,484.47 


Saltfleet 






106,190.08 








4,976.46 








11,024.15 


Welland . . 






3,799.81 








4,735.70 














Totals — Municipalities 


16,331,243.73 

338,688.94 

2,802,655.78 

Renewals Exp 


36,464,372.20 
421,071.31 

ense and Ad 


1,119,993.76 
11,787.21 

justments. . . 


11,685,879.87 

49,210.14 

798,737.67 


65,601,489.56 


Rural Districts not included in above 
Companies and Government Industrie 


JS 

Less 


820,757.60 
3,601,393.45 




12,533,827.68 
218,936.72 


70,023,640.61 
218,936.72 


Totals — Municipalities, Rural Districts and 
Companies 


19,472,588.45 
65,642,615.86 

26,914,720.75 

112,029,925.06 

2,245,230.96 


36,885,443.51 


1,131,780.97 


12,314,890.96 


69,803,703.89 
65,642,615.86 


(purchased from Ontario Power Corn- 






1,151,668.56 
13,466,559.52 


28,066,389.31 


Totals of Niagara System Revenue-produc- 

December, 1922 

Plants Under Construction — 

and additions and extensions to the 
System to serve Municipal and Rural 


36,885,443.51 


1,131,780.97 


163,513,709.06 
2,246,230.96 




d with 
under 










Grand Totals of all Properties conn 
Construction 


ecte 
ind 


114,276,156.02 


36,885.443.51 


1,131,780.97 


13,466,559.52 


165,759,940.20 



•Denotes shortage 



1923 



HYDRO-ELECTRIC POWER COMMISSION 



385 



PLANT AND RESERVES WITH THE ASSETS, LIABILITIES AND RESERVES 
AS AT 31st DECEMBER, 1922— Continued 



LIABILITIES 


RESERVES AND SURPLUSES 


Municipalities' 
liability in 
respect to Hydro- 
Electric Power 
Commission's 
plants 


Municipal 
debenture 
balances 


Accounts 
payable 
and other 
liabilities 
(municipali- 
ties only) 


Total 
liabilities 


Debentures 

paid, 

sinking 

fund 

and other 

reserves 


Plant 
renewal 
reserves 


Surplus 


Total 

reserves 

and 

surpluses 



SYSTEM 



$ c. 
139,769.50 
12,729.42 
26,682.21 


$ c. 

67,385.63 

7.895.30 

5,233.45 

4,072.84 

210,741.94 

19.422.08 

10,681.99 

48,039.52 

9,000.00 

63,000.00 

8,505.00 

5,402.82 

29,500.00 

6,341.45 
18,048.73 


$ c. 

5,235.27 
2.995.87 

1.224.22 

61,362.23 

1.284.67 

5,957.33 

17.850.14 


$ c. 

212.390.40 

23,620.59 

31.915.66 

5,297.06 

291,487.71 

26,541.08 

44,928.79 

65,889.66 

9,000.00 
70,312.68 
10,075.75 
10,461.60 
37,202.45 

9.849.12 
26,446.57 

7,558.45 
11,018.19 

8,978.87 
23,592.83 
17,378.88 

45,424.51 
9,787.62 

16,168.88 

1,963.50 

495.90 

2,103.45 

8,449.72 

8,102.12 

37,952.16 

27,938.48 

100,321.46 

4,421.54 

10,164.85 

3,533.32 

1,536.69 


$ c. 

79,285.79 

2,237.93 

520.18 

1,178.28 
49,201.99 
4,218.62 
6,730.53 
4,407.13 


$ c 

86,517.68 

3,572.98 

4,839.24 

1,497.00 
65.680.30 
5,641.25 
2,886.90 
2,985.00 


$ c. 

100,538.62 

•1,229.01 

5,364.41 

23.668.19 
97,658.37 

1,679.83 
68.03 

5,181.30 

5.000.00 
1,652.67 


$ c. 

266.342.09 

4,581.90 

10,723.83 

26,343.47 


19,383.54 

5,834.33 

28,289.47 


. 212,540.66 
11.539.70 
9 ,685.46 

12,573.43 

5,000.00 






7,312.68 
1,570.75 
5,058.78 
7,702.45 

3,507.67 
8,397.84 

1,339.84 

388.52 

64.61 




2,877.17 


4,529.84 










1,597.18 


2,851.00 
1,171.69 


822.52 
1,282.94 

*2.04 
*1, 094.89 

♦1,339.84 
*388.52 
694.68 
873.10 
487.63 

3,548.96 
143.30 

1,335.81 

56.71 

297.96 

153.55 

288.56 

590.28 

• 4.763.31 

2,149.39 

3,503.46 
491.77 
564.11 
184.95 

1,402.63 


5,270.70 




2,454.63 






*2.04 




451.27 

423.85 
186.51 
161.06 
346.69 
101.77 

407.94 

62.77 

389.79 

4.89 

154.42 

17.09 
109.85 
115.69 
641.15 
163.82 

907.09 
27.72 

119.04 
36.25 

566.25 


626.62 

290.36 
276.33 
326.71 
357.86 
184.48 

570.99 

85.16 

803.88 

6.61 

339.74 

23.26 
110.28 
207.72 
942.17 
232.78 

1,458.07 

35.43 

176.15 

45.29 

1,230.13 


*17.00 


6,218.61 


*625.63 


10.629.67 




74.32 


8,914.26 




1,182.45 


23,592.83 




1,577.65 


17,378.88 






773.88 


45,424.51 






4,527.89 


9,787.62 






291.23 


16,168.88 






2,529.48 


1,963.50 






68.21 


495.90 






792.12 


2,103.45 






193.90 


8,449.72 






508.69 


8,102.12 






913.69 


37,952.16 






6,346.63 


27,938.48 






2,545.99 


100,321.46 






5,868.62 


4,421.54 






554.92 


10,164.85 






859.30 


3,533.32 






266.49 






3,199.01 


16,331,243.73 

338,688.94 

2,802.655.78 


26,380,725.96 
337,794.42 

Less Renew 


4,150,590.13 
68,300.84 

als Expense a 


46.862,559.82 

744,784.20 

2.802,655.78 

nd Adjustme 


6,630,958.64 

28.451.59 

356,483.00 


7,815,489.15 

47,762.04 

442,254.67 


4,292.481.95 
♦240.23 


18,738,929.74 

75,973.40 

798,737.67 




8,305,505.86 
218,936.72 


19,613,640.81 
218,936.72 










19.472.588.45 
65,64